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Wood storage, DOs and DON'Ts

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 382 days ago 1158 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

3293 posts in 1118 days


382 days ago

Needing some advise on storing wood, DOs and DON’Ts, I have been storing all of my purchased woods inside of my air conditioned shop in which has a window unit but it’s not on when I’m not in it. By storing my woods in this kind of environment have an impact on the lumber? Should I be storing my woods on the outside of my shop, perhaps under a lean-to? I do know that the AC does remove moisture from the air when it’s running plus the cooling and warming effect when turning it on and off.

When purchasing the wood from the lumber mill I notice it is always in a non environment controlled warehouse.

Thanks

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


15 replies so far

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1182 days


#1 posted 382 days ago

If it’s kiln dried I wouldn’t worry.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Cajun Box Sculptor

4939 posts in 1914 days


#2 posted 382 days ago

Randy,
I have lumber storage in two different areas…One is inside my shop that is air conditioned and well insulated. The other storage area is an uninsulated 12×20 shed that has a dehumilifier and a fan but no a/c.
The wood in the shop and the storage shed both seem to do just fine with no problems.
Moisture content of wood in the shop stays around 7-8% and in the shed it levels off around 10%...both are acceptable levels.
My lumber is a combination of kiln dried lumber purchased from the lumberyards and air dried sinker cypress that started out with a 65-70% moisture content.
I think the lumberyards do not climate control their warehouses mainly because of the costs of controlling such a large space that constantly has large doors opening and closing…I wouldn’t want that utility bill.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11099 posts in 1711 days


#3 posted 382 days ago

Just store it flat to avoid warping. Either place should be fine.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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pintodeluxe

3283 posts in 1418 days


#4 posted 382 days ago

Green lumber needs to be stacked and stickered outside. Let it air dry one year per inch of thickness in a location where a breeze will reach it, but rain will not (a three sided shed for instance). Then kiln dry it to 6-8% m.c.

Kiln dried lumber can be stored in your shop. I have had 1000 l.f. of kiln dried quartersawn red oak in my shop for over a year, and it is still at 6-8% m.c. My shop is rarely heated / air conditioned.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4762 posts in 1448 days


#5 posted 382 days ago

Randy,

The people whom I respect have suggested that you bring pieces into the environment to acclimate. This is used for tunge ( sp?) and groove flooring in almost any weather condition. Don’t know what information you have re: Kiln dried vs. air dried, but air dried can be stored outside if it is stickered ( air flow too both sides of the wood) protected from moisture and sun. In my case I did that and found it didn’t do anything for insects! Moved the air dried to a neutral indoor space and treated the area with borax. Still have the results of aggressive ants, and beetles.

George Nakashima stored his slab cuts in a shed , which were air drying vertically. I’m pretty sure it was to keep an eye on the drying .

Even inside your shop the evaporation from one side should also happen to the other especially with long/wide boards. Charles Neil recommends keeping your final cuts in a plastic bag before assembly as any cut to a board releases tension and changes moisture for the different surfaces.

In my case it’s the extremes in humidity and dryness that are causing pieces I’ve had for years to check and crack….grrrrr! I have heat but can’t afford an ac unit that’s big enough, right now.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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Blackie_

3293 posts in 1118 days


#6 posted 381 days ago

Ok thanks for the comments, reason for the question is that I had a nice piece of Rose Wood warp on me and also a 8 quarter x 4” x 6’ slab of maple do the same thing.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4762 posts in 1448 days


#7 posted 381 days ago

Put it in a plastic bag with some moisture? Sometimes it’s just the tension in the wood cut. I have had 2×4’s bend to look like an archers bow. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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Blackie_

3293 posts in 1118 days


#8 posted 381 days ago

Thanks Thomas will do that.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1531 days


#9 posted 381 days ago

I have storage racks for solid wood and plywood in the loft of my unheated barn (gets to -40 degrees in winter).

I acclimate the material by bringing it into the heated shop, stickering it (spacers) and wrapping it with a couple blankets for a day or two, then take one blanket off, and after a couple more days, remove the other blanket.

After leaving the lumber for a few more days I will make some test cuts.

If you think of a 70 to 100 degree change in temperature, something is going to happen, cracking, etc.

I wouldn’t think your AC shop will cause a problem for your materials.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1081 days


#10 posted 381 days ago

I would keep it in the shop for sure if you have the space. There will be more consistent temperature and humidity and the wood will be in a more stable environment.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Blackie_

3293 posts in 1118 days


#11 posted 381 days ago

I am relieved that I don’t have to make any drastic changes if any at all, thanks to you all, I can set my mind at ease.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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AngieO

1135 posts in 752 days


#12 posted 373 days ago

Glad you brought this topic up.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 892 days


#13 posted 373 days ago

Keep it a foot off the concrete floor, sticker it every 2.5’ never lean it up against anything. If you ever purchase wood from a local sawyer, keep that stuff outside even if it was kiln dried. Not all sawyers dry completely and there might be bugs.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 960 days


#14 posted 373 days ago

awi says you should keep wood stored in a moisture controled environment, you can either get a dehumidifier and keep it running emptying it every so often, or leave the ac unit on.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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Blackie_

3293 posts in 1118 days


#15 posted 373 days ago

I have a wall wood rack plus my shop is pier and beam with plyboard flooring so no concrete, so far I’ve had only one bad bow with a slightly twist which was Bubinga, everything else is staying true even with the the AC being turned off at days end.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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