LumberJocks

Switching sharpening systems

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by rfusca posted 07-15-2013 02:36 PM 1531 views 2 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 1310 days


07-15-2013 02:36 PM

For my hand sharpening system, I’ve been doing scary sharp. I like the results, but dealing with the paper is a serious PITA. So, I’ve been looking at switching to the EZE-LAP diamond sharpening stones. The plan is to get the coarse, fine, and super fine. Then finish with a strop with green honing compound.
My concern is if the super fine is ‘fine enough’ before going to the green compound? It says its 1200 grit. I’ve been going considerable higher with paper first.

Will this work well – or do I need something after the super fine, before the green compound?

(Also, I recently switch the lathe chisels sharpening to a Harbor Freight belt sharpening system ala Jim Echter and LOVE IT.)

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer


21 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2044 days


#1 posted 07-15-2013 02:43 PM

Enjoy around a half an hour of some serious sharpening
with Brian Burns.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WO_M95qDdAQ

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#2 posted 07-15-2013 02:57 PM

1200 grit is fairly low on the ‘finishing scale’ – when doing scary sharp I would go to at least 2000 which is also not exactly on the ‘high’ rates of 4000-8000 which people seem to be going.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7115 posts in 2618 days


#3 posted 07-15-2013 04:14 PM

Chris, I’ve been doing the Paul Sellers system you are describing for a few months now. I was skeptical as well as you until I saw him in person at the WW show. All he works at the show is pine and after seeing his end grain I had no doubt it was sharp.

I love this sharpening system! I’ve been using it for a while now and it works great.

The thing I do different is that after working the bevel of the iron, I rub the bur off with a couple of strokes on some old 2000 paper I have on glass. Its only two strokes so the paper lasts forever.

Paul Sellers rubs the bur off on the 1200 grit stone but his is well broken in and mine is new and a little course.

Look at it this way, going to 8000 grit water stone might give you better edge retention in theory but at what cost in time? All the water and mess, flattening, etc…

With the diamond stones and strop you refresh the edge easily in under a minute. It all leads to less procrastination to sharpen which means you will always have sharp tools.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7115 posts in 2618 days


#4 posted 07-15-2013 04:17 PM

Oh and use the Glass cleaner from the dollar store as a lubricant. Not Windex! There is something about the cheap stuff that keeps the swarf from rusting on your stones.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 1310 days


#5 posted 07-15-2013 04:21 PM

Sweet, glad to hear from somebody who has it. I’m setting up a little sharpening station that will have the lathe sharpener out and the diamond stones and all ‘ready to go’...so hopefully I shouldn’t have any excuse!

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7115 posts in 2618 days


#6 posted 07-15-2013 04:25 PM

Yeah, a dedicated sharpening station is key!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View MaroonGoon's profile

MaroonGoon

280 posts in 1425 days


#7 posted 07-15-2013 04:47 PM

BigRedKnothead got me on oilstones with the Veritas MKII sharpening jig and I am very happy with the system. Any system is good though, I know someone who is dead set on scary sharp and another person set on oilstones and another person set on waterstones. To each his own. Find which one you like and go for it.

-- "Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone." -- Pablo Picasso

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7115 posts in 2618 days


#8 posted 07-15-2013 04:55 PM

Its true that all the sharpening systems work but at $35 per diamond stone with free shipping on Amazon its hard to beat. Also, the diamond stones allow you to sharpen A2 steel (not that I’m a big fan of it anyway)

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 1310 days


#9 posted 07-15-2013 05:05 PM

@Mauricio – yup, and the double stone is like 57 for the fine/super fine. So really, you could get all three grades for just over 100. Which is pretty great for a set of 8 inch ‘stones’.

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7115 posts in 2618 days


#10 posted 07-15-2013 05:10 PM

Yeah but the single stones are so cheap. And having single stones allows you to make one of these:

So its even faster to sharpen, no flipping the stones in the middle of the process.
(I already had the DMT Duo sharp, otherwise I would have gotten the EZ Lap)

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 1310 days


#11 posted 07-15-2013 05:14 PM

Yup, I was planning on individual stones. I’m going to buy them one at a time to swap out the grades of paper in my current setup and then over the course of the next couple of months acquire all three and ditch the paper (but maybe keep the 2000).

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2402 posts in 2350 days


#12 posted 07-15-2013 06:12 PM

I use the diamond stones up to 1200 grit and then a 4000 and 8000 grit waterstone. Works pretty well for me. I was using the scary sharp method but found the same as you; it works well but dealing with the sandpaper was a PITA.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#13 posted 07-15-2013 07:27 PM

you can also get a 3 micron dmt that is equal to 2000 grit. I have one and it would work with a strop. I have a hard oil stone that works just a little better, so thats what I use. I keep my strop dry.

I did this write up about it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7160 posts in 2381 days


#14 posted 07-15-2013 07:33 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3179

I use/used scary sharp and occasionally still do, HOWEVER, switching to a belt based sharpening system is sooo much easier and faster that I don’t even have to stop and think about it. I mostly use 180-grit belts but could go as high as 600-grit. That said, when using a belt system, you do NOT need to go at such a high grit because of the speed at which the belt passes under your iron to be sharpened. Then a touch up on the buffing wheel with 10,000-grit and it becomes a mirror finish. Just my 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 1310 days


#15 posted 07-15-2013 07:38 PM

@DonW – Ya, I’m considering a hard arkansas or such after the super fine eze-lap – but…I’d really love to avoid the mess if I could. I guess its just going to be getting it all setup and finding out if I think I need another level.

So many folks stop at so many different levels, I guess between everybody using different steel and different standards – there is no ‘right’ answer, eh?

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com