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Forum topic by mot posted 2609 days ago 1641 views 1 time favorited 42 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mot

4911 posts in 2641 days


2609 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw alignment splitter

I’ve been quite obsessive about tool alignment but recently I’ve got an odd thing happening with my tablesaw. Lately, when ripping hardwoods, the piece is having a tendency of wandering away from the fence after the cut. I am an occasion user of splitters but have become more religious about it because of this new tendency. I’ve checked blade alignment to mitre slot, fence to mitre slot, fence to blade, mitre slot to mitre slot and I’m within 2/1000’s at any point.

What I’m wondering is, why is this happening. I use feather boards when I can, but I find they don’t work that well if you have a rough edge that you’re ripping. I use GRRRippers, but as everyone that has completed one project knows, it’s not hard to find the limitations on limitless tools that you purchase.

I often rip with the bandsaw, but I really prefer my tablesaw…until lately. I’m just wondering what’s changed.

The one thing that I have done, that is a bit different, is that the blade was always about 89 degrees. Not for any reason other than the combo square I was using to check it was not square. D’OH…regardless, I’m using a multigauge from Oneway that IS square now.

When I rip sheet goods, I don’t have this problem at all.

Could it be a release in tensions in the wood with dimensioning? As I havn’t had this happen before, it’s recently just happening, now that I think about it, with one batch of maple…maybe I just answered my own question, but I thought the situation warranted discussion.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)


42 replies so far

View miles125's profile

miles125

2179 posts in 2610 days


#1 posted 2609 days ago

There may be a chance that you dulled the teeth just on one side of the blade? Might try a diff blade. I always check fence alignment by just bringing the fence over to the blade & checking the clearance at front an rear of blade. Be sure to spin the blade & find a happy medium in its warp. Doesnt take much misalignment to make a board (especially a thick one) wander. Hope i’ve helped.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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RonR

71 posts in 2613 days


#2 posted 2609 days ago

Check that the splitter is perfectly aligned with the blade, especially if you are using a blade that is different thickness since when you last aligned the splitter. If it is out of alignment it’ll pull the board away from fence or push it very tightly against the fence.

-- RonR, Massachusetts

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RonR

71 posts in 2613 days


#3 posted 2609 days ago

I have a PM66 and there are two 2 bolts to adjust the splitter. Your’s is likely similar. I had the same problem when the leading edge if the splitter was correctly aligned but the back of the splitter was not coplaner with the blade, so the back to the splitter was twisted out of alignment and pulled the wood away from the fence.

-- RonR, Massachusetts

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2626 days


#4 posted 2609 days ago

Carefully cut a piece without the splitter in place to about 2/3 of it’s length.
Flip the piece aound and insert it over the blade from the back side of the saw with the power off.
1.Check the splitter now to see if it binds in the kerf.
2.If the blade is aligned the wood should still touch the fence at the back..

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2641 days


#5 posted 2609 days ago

That’s all within normal, Bob. The splitter is aligned. The problem persists when I have to remove the splitter for cuts. Then the hardwood drifts from the fence after the cut. I just did a couple more cuts and see the same thing. Double checking the blade/fence alignment, it’s all good. Hrmph! As I stated, this is a new phenomena and it’s ticking me off.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2691 days


#6 posted 2609 days ago

Has Spid-ato Man met his match…..? Will evil Dr. Misalignment win the day….?

......and now a word from our sponsor…..The new Festool Miracle Saw Alignment System is a wonder of modern engineering….........

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2626 days


#7 posted 2608 days ago

One more question before I give up Tom.
When you cut the wood 2/3 of the way through was the kerf even from one end to the other?
If the wood has movement it should close the kerf or open it as the case presents.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2695 days


#8 posted 2608 days ago

Is it affecting the accuracy of the cut? If not, why mess with it?

Maybe: Video it. Then we can see if it is something you are doing technique wise or not.

If you get your feed hand (right hand for most) too close to the fence and let go of your support hand you the wood can pivot away from the fence. I do this on occasion. Try adjusting your right hand position on the wood.

Does this happen when you use the featherboards etc? If not, it seems it is probably your technique.

You may be doing this already… but try to keep pressure from the lower left corner of the board, diagonal towards the back right end of the stock with your eyes on the fence at all times.

A little video where I am ripping some stock; you can see my pushstick angled towards the fence.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2842 days


#9 posted 2608 days ago

tHERE’S A GOOD CHANCE THAT THE MATERIAL YOU’RE CUTTING HAS A SLIGHT CROWN AND IF THE CROWN IS AGAINST THE FENCE THEN THE CUT IS GOING TO DUPLICATE IT. WHEN I NOTICE THAT HAPPENING I TURN THE BOARD OVER TO REMOVE THE CROWN. I BUY WOOD THAT IS EITHER 1 SIDE STRAIT LINE RIPPED OR S2S WHICH HAS BOTH SIDES ROUGH CUT. I USE A LONG STRAIT EDGE TO DETERMINE WHICH SIDE IS CORWNED AND THEN CUT THE CROWN OFF. USING A 4’ LEVEL FOR 4’ MATERIAL WORKS GREAT. FOR LONGER MATERIAL A LONGER LEVEL IS NEEDED. I LIKE THE ALUMINUM I-BEAM LEVELS, AS THEY SEEM TO BE THE TALLEST STRAITEST EDGE I HAVE IN THE SHOP.

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2641 days


#10 posted 2608 days ago

Hey guys…

I just tested it with a featherboard and it happened a bit again. I always use a jointed edge against the fence. I always double check the jointed edge against my workbench, or tablesaw top. I just checked to make sure the fence isn’t pushing away at the back of the saw table. I usually use a pushstick with a hook and keep it on the fence side of the blade. I push clockwise pressure on it to keep the workpiece along the fence.

I’m going to throw in another WWII blade that’s in the shop and see if I recreate the same thing. I wonder if I warped my blade somehow, though I doubt is. It’s odd for sure. It’s just a 16th or less, but I find my eye catching it and I’m concerned that it may take my attention away from the cut. It’s just with smaller pieces too so I don’t feel like getting one in the gut.

If I hold the piece tight to the fence, it stays tight. There is not blade burning with good feed rate, and if I stop pushing the piece as soon as it stops cutting, so the back of the blade is still spinning against the piece, I get no blade marks…mind you, now that I think about it, if there was an alignment issue with the fence going away from the blade at the back, then I wouldn’t see that anyway…hrmph. I’m stumped.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View surplusdealdude's profile

surplusdealdude

45 posts in 2615 days


#11 posted 2608 days ago

If you’ve used your saw for a while, the bearings that support the armature are going to wear down a bit, introducing some play into the shaft and the blade.

When you push your wood against the blade, that’s going to force it either back or down or a combination of the 2. That would result in the flat part of the blade acting as something that would force the wood away from the fence, because it would be at an angle to the wood instead of parallel.

This might show up with hardwood more than softwoods because the blade has to work harder to cut the harder wood. This will be tough to check because you probably are talking a thousandth of an inch in wear or less.

It’s just a guess, but I have this happen as well with my plastics when I’ve been using one of the cheap saws for a few years. The blade starts getting really sloppy but by then, the armature’s pretty well worn out, so it’s time to get another one.

-- surplusdealdude

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2626 days


#12 posted 2608 days ago

Tom, I am going to assume you know that most fences are set a hair or two loose at the back to help prevent Kickback?

Your next test might be to “mic” both ends of your cut piece to affirm that the problem is just the fence setting or the blade/splitter is involved.
You can just filp the stock end for end and use your sawblade as a guage to find out if the cut has wandered from beginning to end.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2641 days


#13 posted 2608 days ago

Yes, Bob, I’m aware of deliberate play at the back of the fence. Mine is hardly noticeable, but does exist. I’ll do a quick test as you mentioned after supper. It’s really bugging me now. :) My wife says it’s because I want a cabinet saw.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2702 days


#14 posted 2608 days ago

Going to try to borrow my saw? I better turn the computer off….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2641 days


#15 posted 2608 days ago

LOL

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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