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Router Lift for Hitachi M12V ?

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Forum topic by BArnold posted 07-12-2013 01:46 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BArnold

174 posts in 490 days


07-12-2013 01:46 PM

My current router lift is a JessEm that came with the Jet JTAS package I bought around 2001. It’s a decent lift that has served me well, but I have to use angled wrenches to change bits. I’d like to update to a lift that will raise my M12V collet above the table. I’ve been reviewing several lifts online, but would like some input from real-life users.

Thanks for the help, group!

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA


7 replies so far

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MrRon

2834 posts in 1901 days


#1 posted 07-13-2013 04:49 PM

I believe the design of the M-12V won’t permit you to get the chuck above any table. If you couldn’t raise the chuck above the base out of the table, you won’t be able to do it with any lift I know of. I have the same router and I know what a pain it is to change bits.

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firefighterontheside

4374 posts in 514 days


#2 posted 07-13-2013 06:54 PM

I also have the router and have always assumed that I would not be able to make bit changes above the table. That is one reason I have not gotten one. I’m interested to see what you find out.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3365 posts in 1470 days


#3 posted 07-13-2013 10:02 PM

That is precisely the reason I ditched my M12V. Bent over bit changes under the cabinet are a thing of the past.
Freud routers come with built in lifts, and full above-the-table adjustments.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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BArnold

174 posts in 490 days


#4 posted 07-13-2013 10:36 PM

Thanks, everyone. Further research showed me the only way I could accomplish my upgrade is to buy a new router lift and router. I ordered the Incra Mastr-Lift II with the PC 75182 motor. It was more than I wanted to spend, but I’ll have what I want this way.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

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Gerald

42 posts in 443 days


#5 posted 07-14-2013 02:33 AM

I am shopping for a new router table and lift and am leaning heavily toward the Bench Dog Cast Iron table with Pro Fence and ProMaxRT lift. What I cannot figure out is, if it’s important to be able to change bits above the table (which it is to me), why is it OK for the router’s speed control to be under the table? I want access to everything without having to crawl on my hands and knees. Getting too old for that to be fun. I’m wondering about using an external router speed controller with a fixed speed router, i.e. PC 75192, which is otherwise the same as the variable speed PC 75182. The difference in router motor prices would or just about would pay for a good controller.

-- Gerald, Rural North Central Arkansas

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BArnold

174 posts in 490 days


#6 posted 07-14-2013 03:14 PM

@Gerald: As I understand, the issue with using an external speed controller has to do with router speed regulation. The internal speed controller has a feedback loop that adjusts the RPM of the motor based on load. An external controller will not have that capability.

-- Bill, Thomasville, GA

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Gerald

42 posts in 443 days


#7 posted 07-15-2013 01:02 AM

OK, BArnold. I understand that whatever it is, there is a problem with using an external speed controller with a variable speed machine (router in this case), but what about with a single speed router? My surmise is that the RPMs of an otherwise single speed universal motor are controlled by the AC frequency (60 Hz, 50 Hz, etc.). RPMs can be reduced by lowering the input voltage, but then you run into current/heat and motor power problems like you commonly do with low voltage situations with other appliance/tool motors. Voltage reduction on an AC motor has to be an all bad solution, IMHO. Frequency control is probably the operationally ideal solution but that is too complex and expensive for everyday application. It does seem to me, however, that current control might be an easy enough and acceptable option. Guess I need to ask my EE nephew this question and see what he says. I’ll also ask PC, but the answer I expect to get from them will likely come from no deeper than the warranty text. Guess I also need to confirm that the PC 75192 motor is, in fact, a “universal” motor, or if not, what it is.

Thanks for your feedback, anyway.

-- Gerald, Rural North Central Arkansas

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