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Forum topic by novakid34 posted 422 days ago 920 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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novakid34

11 posts in 1009 days


422 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: ipe table outdoor granite

My parents have an extra slab of granite laying around from a kitchen remodel that is roughly 8’x3’ and weighs around 450 pounds. Instead of selling it they want to turn it into an outdoor table. I know Ipe is very heavy and strong so I don’t want to over engineer this thing. Would 4×4” legs be overkill? I am going to just build a very basic 4 legged frame with probably 5/4×6” supports mortise and tenoned into the legs all around the top. Also I plan on using 1×4” planks spaced evenly along the top(width wise) to support the granite. I’ve read that Ipe doesnt glue well so I will be using stainless steel lag bolts as well(plugged).

I have looked into other woods but Ipe is pretty affordable and this seems like a unique opportunity to work with it. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.


22 replies so far

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1964 posts in 908 days


#1 posted 422 days ago

Sounds like a plan…..No experience with Ipe…closest South American hardwood I worked with is Brazilian Cherry which is hard…but I know Ipe is a lot harder…I’d imagine good sharp tools would be required for machining especially sharp chisels for those mortises…..You are correct it doesn’t glue well…stainless hardware will last forever.. good idea to bung the holes…It is perfect for outdoors and is beautiful….good luck

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

63 posts in 430 days


#2 posted 422 days ago

I have a granite surface plate that weighs. About 400#s. It’s no joke in my shop i use for a assembly table.You don’t want your table racking over put a stretcher down the center.Maybe around 6” or 7 off the ground.Think about the weight of the top and all the stuff that may get sat on top at a party.Plus people leaning on it.Make it stout.Its not easy to find ipe in thick stock..So keep an open mind. Aj

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2797 posts in 1875 days


#3 posted 421 days ago

Take into account the ground it will be sitting on. You will be ending up with 125+ lbs each leg. Legs carry vertical loads, so 4×4 sounds good. I would use 2x material for the frame. M&T is fine. If you are going to plug the holes, you don’t need to use SS. Grade 5 fasteners are stronger and cheaper. Look for hardware that is used to attach legs to frames in table construction. If your top is 8’ x 3’, I would make the footprint for the legs, 6’ x 30”. How do you plan to attach the granite top to the frame? If you can drill holes in the underside of the granite (if the granite is thick enough), you can epoxy in short studs that you can bolt angles to. As an option, you may be able to epoxy an angle clip directly to the granite and screw the clip to the wood frame.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1245 posts in 704 days


#4 posted 421 days ago

MrRon Stainless Steel screws are needed for Ipe because of the level of acids in the wood, not because of exterior exposure. I would recommend using stainless steel screws even under plugs. You also need to protect your lungs with this stuff.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1920 posts in 500 days


#5 posted 421 days ago

I’ve only used Ipe for decking. I have heard that same point from others though; doesn’t glue well.

It will blunt your tools and blades. Dust is an irritant to your lungs. Hold your breath, use a respirator, dust collection, and do so outside.

Very hard… Very dense… Very durable… And very beautiful. It gets better looking when exposed to ultraviolet light. (Sunlight)

No finish is required.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

216 posts in 1238 days


#6 posted 421 days ago

Make sure you seal the end grain well, prone to checking. Have built 2 decks with the stuff but never any furniture

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1423 posts in 993 days


#7 posted 421 days ago

Consider making the base out of 1 1/2” L copper tubing and fittings as I did on the table below. My top is of 5/4×6 Ipe decking, but yours would only need three strips to carry the granite. Allow for generous overhang on either end to accommodate chairs. The copper will acquire patina with age, or it can be patinated with vinegar or ammonia treatment. It’ll carry the weight with no problem, and last forever outside or in.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View novakid34's profile

novakid34

11 posts in 1009 days


#8 posted 421 days ago

What would be the best glue to use inside the mortise and tenon joints. I understand Ipe doesn’t glue well, but I figure it cant hurt and I will have stainless steel screws driven through the joints as well. Gorilla Glue? Standard wood glue?

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1964 posts in 908 days


#9 posted 421 days ago

It’s an oily wood…Gorilla Glue would be good for that….but check into E6000 adhesive….maybe this would work ??...here’s a link…..or PL construction adhesive….

http://www.biosafe-inc.com/e6000_series_retail.htm

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

1210 posts in 607 days


#10 posted 421 days ago

Don’t use urethane Gorilla glue for the MT joints as it will expand and possibly crack the joints. Construction adhesive would work. What kind of granite? Is it 2 or 3cm? (3/4” or 1-1/4”). Granite weighs about 13lbs per square foot if it is 3/4” thick. That would make the top a little over 300lbs for a 3/4” slab. Consider the overhang length at the ends of the table if you do not plan to support it. 4×4 would be goood for the legs. Make a couple of cross pieces between the aprons to help support the middle of the slab. As far as attaching the top, just use construction adhesive at the top of the leg posts. the slab will not go anywhere and you shoud be able to remove it without breaking the slab in case you need to move it. You would not want to try to move it with the legs and support structure attached. Do not drill any holes into the granite for fasteners unless you plan to epoxy something back in as this might lead to the slab cracking at some point.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View novakid34's profile

novakid34

11 posts in 1009 days


#11 posted 421 days ago

It’s 1-1/4” thickness. I figured around 10” would be a safe overhang on either end of the table lengthwise. Excuse my ignorance but what exactly would be considered “construction adhesive” ? Is it something I can find at a lowes/home depot? I do not plan on drilling any holes in the granite at all.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

63 posts in 430 days


#12 posted 421 days ago

Construction adhesive is not a good choice .It may keep water out but it’s not really a glue.And it takes forever to dry. Polyurethane is much better.I use gorilla glue on custom gates I make never had a joint push apart or fail.Try some for your self on a test piece you can get them both at the Borg .

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

1210 posts in 607 days


#13 posted 421 days ago

As far as adhesive, it is possible to use urethane adhesive for the MT joints as long as there is enough room for the expansion of the glue. I have had MT joints crack using it and although I use urethane adhesive often, I do not use it anymore for joinery. Your top will be fine with 10” overhang with no supports if it is 3cm (1-1/4”). Make sure it is granite and not marble. I would not trust a lot of marble species to hold up without support. I still recommend construction adhesive for the top for the reasons I posted before. Usually I would recommend Akemi (Knife Grade) epoxy, but as stated before the top will not go anywhere after setting as gravity will hold it down. The adhesive is just to keep it in place. Good luck with your project.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View novakid34's profile

novakid34

11 posts in 1009 days


#14 posted 421 days ago

What would be the largest safe overhang? I figure a bigger overhang will prevent people from banging knees on the frame. It’s definitely granite and definitely 1.25” thick.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2797 posts in 1875 days


#15 posted 420 days ago

joeyinsouthaustin, Thanks for the correction of the screw material.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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