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Freud glue line blade for Bosch 4100-09 table saw

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Forum topic by vsefcik posted 06-30-2013 05:24 PM 3026 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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vsefcik

11 posts in 1370 days


06-30-2013 05:24 PM

I have a Bosch 4100-09 table saw and I’m considering purchasing a Freud glue line rip blade. The Bosch manual states that the blade kerf width should be .092” or wider and the plate thickness should be .088” or less. The Freud LM75R010 blade has a kerf of .091” (slightly undersize) and plate thickness of .071” (OK). The Freud LM74R010 blade has a kerf of .118” (OK) but the plate thickness is .098” (too thick). So both are slightly out of spec with the Bosch documentation. Has anyone used either of these two blades in a Bosch 4100 table saw? If so, did you have to remove the riving knife (something I really don’t want to do)? If neither will work, do you have a recommendation for another glue line rip blade. Most of my work is with 3/4” cherry and oak. Thanks.

-- vsefcik


5 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#1 posted 06-30-2013 06:37 PM

Can you buy another riving knife for the saw? If so I would shave a little off of the thickness by gently sanding a thou or two off of the thickness of a spare riving knife then you should be able to use the thin kerf blade safely.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2038 days


#2 posted 06-30-2013 11:34 PM

Kerf is the only thing that matters; not the plate.
If the kerf is the same size or bigger than the riving knife, you should be ok; just adjust the riving knife carefully. I used to use a wooden splitter that was the exact size of the kerf. Never an issue.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 06-30-2013 11:46 PM

There’s going to be a little bit of arbor runout, and likely some blade runout that will add to the overall kerf width of the cut, so as NW said, if the kerf is the same size or bigger than the riving knife, you should be ok if everything is lined up well.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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vsefcik

11 posts in 1370 days


#4 posted 07-01-2013 02:25 PM

Thanks for the replies. I had the belief that the plate thickness shouldn’t be an issue as long as the kerf is wider than the riving knife. I did find two web sites in which people were using a Freud P410 blade on the Bosch 4100 and the P410 blade has a plate thickness of .098”, the same as the Freud LM74R010. So, I’ll give the LM74R010 a try. I do make my own zero clearance inserts and will make another for this new blade.

-- vsefcik

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#5 posted 07-01-2013 04:19 PM

You’re correct that the plate thickness shouldn’t matter…it’s the kerf width that’s key. The LM74 is full kerf, which will labor your saw more than the TK. The width difference may only be 1/32” inch, but a full kerf blade is upwards of 33% wider, which adds considerably more resistance to the motor.

Freud's LU86 has a kerf of 0.094” and will easily rip a glue ready edge in any material that the LM74 or LM75 will handle. It also offers the benefit of decent crosscuts should the need ever arise. There are many other good choices that will also give a glue ready finish in up to 1” material….the Infinity 010-150 Combomax will rip even thicker material with a glue ready edge and has a kerf 0.097”. The Irwin Marples 40T ATB or 50T ATB/R blade have a kerf of 0.098”, and will also rip easily to over 1.5” with a glue ready edge.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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