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Bedan as a Parting Tool

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Forum topic by ScrubPlane posted 376 days ago 1367 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ScrubPlane

186 posts in 780 days


376 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe turning

Some time ago I purchased a very expensive thinly tapered fluted Sorby parting tool. After being wrenched from my hands three times in fifteen minutes, piercing the drywall of my garage, and having to answer awkward questions relative to safety from an inquisitive wife the tool has not left the rack since.

A few moments ago, however, I recognized the tool I ‘thought’ I should have purchased as my parting tool on a YouTube video…its called a ‘Betan’.

Question…has anyone used one of these as a parting tool, what’s your experience, thoughts and challenges to same?

They seem heavier and less prone to being yanked from my grip. I’ve developed some homemade techniques that allow me to continue turning safely without the need of a parting tool but I would still like to add both the tool and its technique to my repertoire.

Thanks…


14 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3628 posts in 2247 days


#1 posted 376 days ago

I suppose you could use a bedan as a parting tool … but IMHO the bedan is much wider than a parting tool needs to be (my bedan is 3/8” wide).

I have 2 parting tools … a diamond shaped tool that takes a cut just under 1/4” wide, and a thin tool that takes about 1/16”. I use the thin tool more than the other one.

I use my bedan to form tenons … some people use them to roll beads, but I haven’t had the occasion to try that yet.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#2 posted 376 days ago

Bedan has not replaced my other thin, flat, and diamond parting tools, or all my skews, and gouges.

First successful Tippy Top was turned with my Bedan, posted here couple of weeks ago. Had to use my thin parting tool to turn off lathe and reverse in chuck to sand smooth. Cannot tell you how many times have tried to turn a tippy top.

Only secret can pass on is adjust tool rest height for support when doing different task and practice on scrap wood. I use a diamond file & cards to sharpen my Bedan.

Jean Francois Escoulen You-tube videos will help you master different task and explains better than I can.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMDPE8i4LiQ

-- Bill

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Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#3 posted 376 days ago

If this John Lucas parting tool video had sound would be an excellent teaching tool.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9W2m9JCG6IY

All parting tools designed used for cutting tenons, and establishing diameters what separates them is width, depth of cut, and ability to part a piece of the lathe. While diamond, flat, and thin parting tools excellent for parting wood from the lathe Bedan not so much.

Only way to get proficient with any parting tools is practice. While most cuts start out with tool flat on the rest peeling wood, may have to rock side to side or wiggle tool as cut gets deeper to keep from binding then back to flat peeling to part wood from lathe. Approach and techniques vary from one turner to the next.

Diamond parting tool should be first on your list to buy because easy to use without binding in the cut. My Sorby DPT about twenty years old and have to file nicks out of tool rest after repeated use.

A 1/4” parting tool with flat sides and bottom does not nick up the tool rest as much as a DPT can bind in the cut until you learn how to use it. With practice can turn beads with this tool.

Both a DPT & FPT have better reach and control over the tool rest than thin parting tools.

Thin parting tool excel in parting off wood in tight space. Thin parting tools will bend, burn, and bind in thick cuts if not careful. I often bring one in for final parting after using diamond or flat parting tool.

Bedan also a flat parting tool is excellent for wide peeling cuts but can do the same thing with a skew chisel for turning tenons or space between turning elements. Can not tell you how many years my Bedan sat in tool rack without using. Prefer my narrow parting tools over it.

Fluted parting tool does not splinter wood because of flutes. You can make your own from any flat parting tool with quick trip to grinder.

-- Bill

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ScrubPlane

186 posts in 780 days


#4 posted 375 days ago

Your comments/suggestions has raised another question. At what height does one keep the tool rest when using a traditional parting tool?

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ScrubPlane

186 posts in 780 days


#5 posted 375 days ago

More questions…the link below is where you can see the Sorby fluted parting tool I have.

It has a single bevel on one side and is flat the entire opposite length.

Stupid question…does the bevel side face down or upwards?

I cannot find a single video demonstrating this particular type of tool and the Sorby web site is sorely lacking in this regard.

Again…thanks.

Either way…I was able to create the attached even without any skills with the parting tool. There’s always another way…my first crack at a segmented bowl.

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Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#6 posted 375 days ago

There is no answer to your question, really depends upon woodturner and what attempting to do.

For normal parting a piece off lathe, like tool rest slightly below center for me. I will adjust tool rest up or down if needed. May only part wood down to 1/8” or ¼” diameter remove tool rest and saw a piece off with a hand saw.

Have seen other woodturners start parting off with tool rest at center line or slightly above. Am sure they adjust as needed too.

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3628 posts in 2247 days


#7 posted 375 days ago

Here’s a link to video that illustrates use of the parting tool: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9W2m9JCG6IY

Q: “…does the bevel side face down or upwards?”
A: I’d go with the flute down … just a WAG.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View ScrubPlane's profile

ScrubPlane

186 posts in 780 days


#8 posted 375 days ago

Gerry…Thanks for the link. I’ve watched that video several times but I’m hoping to find one utilizing the same Sorby fluted tool as I have. I appreciate that the technique should be the same but I guess I’m looking for that greater comfort level by seeing the exact same tool in action.

Trying Sorby as well…

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Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#9 posted 375 days ago

Which one of these parting tools do you own?

1/16” fluted parting tool
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=108734&Category_Code=tools-srby-pt-fpt116

3/16” fluted parting tool
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=108736&Category_Code=tools-srby-pt-fpt316

Not long after getting into turning learned about taking a diamond or flat parting tool to corner of grinding wheel and grinding tips or*flutes”. So took my diamond parting tool and made mine that way. Yes great for no tear out on initial cuts but stunk as a parting tool. So after couple of uses re-sharpened and took away flutes. Bought this tool almost twenty years ago and still works just fine.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=108733&Category_Code=tools-srby-pt-dpt

My solution to your problem is buy one of these or both. Keep your fluted parting tool for initial entry or sell it.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=100131&Category_Code=tools-pkrd-pt

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=100132&Category_Code=tools-pkrd-pt

-- Bill

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ScrubPlane

186 posts in 780 days


#10 posted 375 days ago

The 3/16 fluted version…

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#11 posted 374 days ago

You have a good tool; honestly think if pick up a less expensive diamond or flat HSS parting tool will see a world of difference. Packard Woodworks house brand made by Hamlet and have same address as Henry Taylor tools in England.

Craft Supplies also sells Hamlet as well as other major brands.
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/search?term=hamlet+parting+tools

Don’t need anything more than HSS parting tool so any brand will do!

I use both diamond and flat parting tool almost every time I turn. Seldom think about it and use whichever one grab first. For many years only had a diamond parting tool and got along just fine. My Bedan bought year or two latter and it mostly collected dust until recently. Have since added a flat and thin parting tool.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

-- Bill

View mpax356's profile

mpax356

43 posts in 1076 days


#12 posted 372 days ago

I have had similar experiences as yours with the 2mm tool. In talking with some folks, I conclude that the tool should be used with the flute on the top. I was using it upside down which gave it less support. I have a plain thin parting tool which gives me no problems as long as the spindle is no more than say 2” in diameter. I have not had a chance to experiment with it using it the “correct?” way which is different than the catalog pictures would steer one to think is correct.

-- MPax, Atlanta

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3628 posts in 2247 days


#13 posted 372 days ago

From Robert Sorby’s website:

”This tool has a milled flute running along the bottom edge, creating two sharp spurs at the cutting face. These sever the fibres to produce a burnished finish. The tapered profile also reduces the risk of binding in the cut. This features a radically new and unique cutting profile with a blade profile of only 2mm. The long bevel has a milled flute which is the cutting face. The small bevel his the sharpening face. When parting off, this unique arrangement causes the tip to always cut at a shear cutting angle of 45º, producing a finish without equal from a parting tool, virtually eliminating the need for sanding.”

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

936 posts in 719 days


#14 posted 372 days ago

Manufacturers, vendors, and professional woodturners often entice us to buy special purpose tools that really do nothing special over other basic turning tools. Yes, fluted parting tools great a preventing tear out on initial cuts. After initial cut advantage is gone from my experience using a modified parting tool with flutes. Never thought about top or bottom edge, and used like any normal parting tool.

Sorby has been selling their fluted parting tool before I got into turning and back when I started folks looked for alternatives to high price specialty tools.

Peter Galbert has a very good short video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_43nB2zTX8

John Lucas has one too but audio is terrible so just turn off and watch.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9W2m9JCG6IY

-- Bill

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