LumberJocks

Infill Questions - A Simple Survey

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by JustJoe posted 06-29-2013 11:16 PM 505 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 793 days


06-29-2013 11:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane infill plane

I’m in the middle of a build and am stuck. These questions are for those of you who:
1) Own an infill plane (seeing one on the internet doesn’t count, sorry). and
2) Use it. (nothing against you c@!!ect@rs out there but I need it to work, not just look pretty)

The questions:
1. How thick is the blade?
2. How wide is the mouth?
3. How thick is the chipbreaker?
4. Does it work or do the shavings jam up or other problem?
5. What is the frog angle?

I really need to know the answer to those before I can continue. Not as important, but ‘ve also got these questions if you’ve got the time to grab your plane and do a bit more examination:

6. What is the length/width?
7. What is the weight?
8. Does it feel right, too light, too heavy?

Thanks in advance for any info you can provide.
Joe

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.


3 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

15584 posts in 1322 days


#1 posted 07-02-2013 12:22 AM

So I’ve built multiples, and the answer to most of your questions vary, but here goes.

1. I have some with 1/4” O1 hardened and some regular old vintage irons and a few with new Hock 3/16” . The Hock and vintage need a chip breaker, the 1/4” does not. The thicker is more forgiving if you don’t get everything just right, or you don’t really care to bed it well. If they are bedded properly the thinner work just as well.

2. Keep the mouth thickness tight if you can, but with a higher angle this become less important.

3. when I make a chip breaker, its out of 3/16” precision ground. It seems to work best.

4. of course they work. Is that really a question? :-)

5.I’m working on one now that about 47*. The rest have ben 50 or 55.

6. read through my blogs, they vary.

7. I thought I posted some weight comparisons but I can’t find t now. I’ll keep looking.

8. I like the extra weight. I think it helps the processes.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 793 days


#2 posted 07-02-2013 02:50 AM

Thanks Don – I know there are a couple million variations out there so I was trying to get specific specs from one plane – so I could say “well at this angle, with this thickness blade and this thickness chipbreaker, the mouth will end up being .X inches wide.” And they don’t all work – there are a lot of designer infills out there that look good but because the builder didn’t get the right combination of #1-3, 5 they just jam up. I saw one last year in Tucson that was great from a distance but the guy couldn’t get it to perform. He wanted $200 for it and he’s probably still got it.
I like the extra heavy ones too but was wondering if there is a cut-off point where it’s just too heavy.
thanks
Joe

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15584 posts in 1322 days


#3 posted 07-02-2013 10:57 AM

The problem is it’s not that easy because it depends on to many factors. Are you planing hardwood or softwood, end grain or difficult grain, smoothing, shooting or jointing?

Stanley made most of there beds at 45^ because its the best average. 50^ works better on more difficult grain and 55^ is going into the impossible grain. I’ve even seen a 70^ but never tried one. That would really be a scraping action I would think.

so why not just make everything a high angle? Because the higher the angle the quicker it will dull, and its harder to push. Its also slower.

tight mouths help, but again it depends. With a thick blade and no chip breaker, a 55^ bed works fine with a 1/4” mouth. The close mouth controls the curl pushing into the chip breaker. No chip breaker, no need.

keeping the throat clear is a challenge. I’ve had to open a few of my first ones up a little. But now I know to watch it in the design. I’ve even seen some factory made ( I have a wood bodied Sargent that comes to mind) that will clog quicker than sh&^.

then of course there is the low angle. Probably not were your headed so we’ll leave it alone for now.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase