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Forum topic by Millo posted 06-29-2013 02:07 PM 682 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Millo

543 posts in 1804 days


06-29-2013 02:07 PM

Our cat is not declawed. Much to my chagrin I have noticed little divets/”pecks” on the edges of our not-so-fine pine (not MDF/chipboard) Ikea coffee table, and chairs from our ash ‘country-style’ small cheapie dining set add up over the years. These come from when the cat jumps onto a piece of furniture and her claws partially come out. The cat’s not declawed and is pretty old now to go ahead and do it w/o having her go crazy—and my wife wouldn’t be happy, either. Also, she likes to rub against the legs, often concentrating her oils on the edges. We do not have a dog but I figured I could add this to the mix. I am going to restrict cat movement when I start moving furniture made by me into the house, but I’m not sure how I’ll do it, without risking divorce.

So: WHAT FINISHES FOR DO YOU USE ON YOUR HANDMADE FURNITURE AT YOUR PET-FRIENDLY HOME?

Does an oil/varnish blend like Danish Oil wear out easily with the constant rubbing from your pet’s fur? Does a gel varnish resist this wear?

...and more importantly:

WHAT MEASURES DO YOU IMPLEMENT AT HOME TO MINIMIZE THE WEAR ON YOUR WOODEN FURNITURE PIECES?


17 replies so far

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 646 days


#1 posted 06-29-2013 02:57 PM

Addressing your furniture wear is going after the symptom and not the source of the problem. Therefore I recommend the following.

I love both dogs and cats, and have owned both. But you must exercise tough love in this situation.

Action plan:
Note: Cats don’t like water.
1. Get a water gun. And a dedicated absorbent rag.
2. Shoot your water gun at your cat when and only when it does stuff to your furniture. Wipe water off furniture and nearby areas right after shooting cat.
3. Of course be affectionate during all other times.

As soon as within 7 days, your cat will understand its associated behaviour and getting shot with water w.r.t. your furniture, and will stop doing the behaviour. I have executed this tactic with cats previously with good success. And no, your cat will not be emotionally traumatized – it will be the same except for the unwanted behaviour. Remember, the cat shouldn’t be controlling you. Good luck.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5281 posts in 2062 days


#2 posted 06-29-2013 03:02 PM

My wife uses the water gun technique on me and it keeps me off the sofa and chairs when I come in the house full of sawdust.
Gotta suggest that she uses it on the cats also…!

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpieceā€¦ because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 646 days


#3 posted 06-29-2013 03:05 PM

Addressing your furniture wear is going after the symptom and not the source of the problem. Therefore I recommend the following.

I love both dogs and cats, and have owned both. But you must exercise tough love in this situation.

Action plan:
Note: Cats don’t like water (tigers, jaguars and leopards are indifferent to water however).
1. Get a water gun. And a dedicated absorbent rag.
2. Shoot your water gun at your cat when and only when it does stuff to your furniture. Wipe water off furniture and nearby areas right after shooting cat.
3. Of course be affectionate during all other times.

As soon as within 7 days, your cat will understand its associated behaviour and getting shot with water w.r.t. your furniture, and will stop doing the behaviour. I have executed this strategy with cats previously with good success. And no, your cat will not be emotionally traumatized – it will be the same except for the unwanted behaviour. Remember, the cat shouldn’t be controlling you. Further, inform your partner of this forum reply and insist the above wisdom is the God’s own truth. Failing to execute the above action plan, I can only wish you good luck.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

969 posts in 1897 days


#4 posted 06-29-2013 03:06 PM

^ Great advice! The only other thing I’ve done is to put a piece of Luaun underneath our beds. This prevents our cats from tearing off the fabric underneath the box spring during thunderstorms. Of course, you could make a scratching post or kitty condo one of your projects, too.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1115 days


#5 posted 06-29-2013 03:26 PM

The best finish would be .22 cal.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5319 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 06-29-2013 03:38 PM

Cats love sharpening their claws on sisal. Ours left the furniture pretty much alone after they got sisal wrapped scratching posts. This was a major change in behaviour.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 646 days


#7 posted 06-29-2013 04:40 PM

Strange, I modified my reply which yielded a second reply. Something going on with these darned computing machines.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

907 posts in 864 days


#8 posted 06-29-2013 08:14 PM

I’ve had indoor cats for 30+ years. They’re all declawed in front, done under anesthesia. They aren’t allowed outside, and they grow up with great personalities, as they’re never getting screamed at for clawing or chased with a water pistol. They still “sharpen claws”, but it doesn’t do any real damage. This is Ike, everybody likes him:

Any good film finish will allow legs to be wiped with a damp cloth.

I like dogs, but I don’t own them because I’m sometimes gone for days on end and cats don’t need nearly as much daily attention.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1065 posts in 1040 days


#9 posted 06-29-2013 08:43 PM

rather than declaw the cat, you can get “claw caps”. Google “soft paws” without the quotes. They’re soft sheaths that slip over the claw and with a couple drops of adhesive are held in place.

If you’ve never heard of these, it might sound like a dumb idea, but I’ve seen them in action, and I’ve helped put them on a couple of different cats. I don’t own any cats right now as my dogs would pester the crap out of them, but the caps are not traumatic to the cat, the claws still go in and out like they always did, but they get sheathed so they do not damage stuff. You can get them in colors and make it look like you gave your cat a funky pedicure. :)

If you have a PetSmart nearby, they sell Kitty Nail Caps.

These things are not permanent. They should shed them every 4 to 6 weeks. So the PetSmart ones would be cheaper. MOST cats are fine with them. Some cats will chew them off. :) Might be worth a look though.

View Millo's profile

Millo

543 posts in 1804 days


#10 posted 06-30-2013 12:21 PM

wow, everyone—thanks!

As a side note I’d like to add she doesn’t really scratch on it, as in deliberate scratching. It’s more jumping on and off furniture which at first I wasn’t cool with but there are certain battles one’s not going to win. She does scratch under the bed.

I had done the spray gun trick a long time ago (she doesn’t get on the counters, two rooms in the house) but thought it’d be difficult to keep her off certain pieces of furniture after my wife has let her get on so many. However, I think I’ll start training her before I move a sofa table into the house.

I’ll also read on the sisal and the ‘cat sandals’. Regarding the cat sandals, think Penelope might be the kind of cat who will chew them off.

Clint, I thought about that solution, but… no.

Ike looks like a cool cat, Barry. I think I’ll ask the vet about declawing such an old cat like Penelope (she’s about 10-1/2).

Thanks everyone!

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

907 posts in 864 days


#11 posted 06-30-2013 03:12 PM

We’ve done old cats, but your vet would know all the specifics of yours…

For a long time, we had a bunch of “dumpster cats” who came and lived with us at various ages. One was too old to declaw, but at her age, she didn’t do much.

View BLarge's profile

BLarge

160 posts in 1216 days


#12 posted 07-03-2013 05:14 PM

A few thoughts:

Think about having the first 1/4 of each of your fingers surgically removed, how would you like that? That’s right, so don’t do it to an animal. There are reason why Cats are messed up behaviorally after that procedure…. they have to be on those 4 legs their who lives, why peopel think declawing even under anesthietic is humane is beyond me. This is not an attack on the OP, nor anybody else here, but think before you permanently alter a cats life.

Second, Bob Flexner’s “Flexner on Finishing” he has a chart comparing finishes- the one that is most heat resistent, scratch resistent and solvent resistent is Oil Based Polyurathane- it is also the products that most people can aplpy easily without needing a spray booth and other expensive tools. I do alot of WB Poly because my pieces often are covered in Milk Paint, and OB Poly turns the color.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1583 posts in 1268 days


#13 posted 07-03-2013 05:32 PM

A long time ago, when I ran my refinishing shop, a woman called me who owned a horse riding academy. Her husband and the hands would come in for lunch, and leave their spurs on. You can imagine what these did to the legs of her nice kitchen chairs. She asked if I had a finish that would resist the spurs.
I told her I wasn’t sure, but there was a two part epoxy finish out there, (I know it is still on the market, just cannot remember the name), and as long as she was game, I would spray her chairs and see how it went.

Bought the two part, and a cheap HF style conventional spray gun. Mixed the epoxy according to instructions which included stripping off all the original finish and having stained bare wood for adhesion.

Sprayed the chairs, which were cheap maple, and had maybe 30 minutes to get this finished. I managed two full wet coats before the gun started spitting a little. I remember even with the MSA masks, the stink was nasty. We did it on a cooler night so it would cure slightly slower.
Next day, went down to look at the results, and my partner tried to steel wool a leg to put on a little Johnsons paste wax. Stuff would not budge. Steel would not cut it. We thought this might be a good thing and delivered the chairs.

Fast forward a year: She calls, and I think Oh Boy, they are all torn up again…No, she wanted to thank me since there was not one scratch in the chairs since they had been sprayed.
Oh, and we tossed the gun after spraying, since even lacquer thinner didn’t seem to want to cut this stuff. Just put it in the cost of the job. I just don’t remember the name of the two-part epoxy varnish.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

907 posts in 864 days


#14 posted 07-03-2013 05:58 PM

There are reason why Cats are messed up behaviorally after that procedure

In 25 years, we’ve never had a problem, and we’ve had as many as 6 cats at a time, every single one a rescue.

We must be horrible people, as we spay and neuter them , too…

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3613 posts in 1948 days


#15 posted 07-03-2013 06:19 PM

I agree entirely with Clint on the .22 bullet…..I hate cats. period…....but then I’m not a dog liker, either…

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

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