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Forum topic by Joseph Jossem posted 06-26-2013 05:22 PM 823 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joseph Jossem

392 posts in 965 days


06-26-2013 05:22 PM

Aloha lumberjocks
I found some beeswax in block form is this the same as buying it in the can?thanks for any help


13 replies so far

View Dominik Matus's profile

Dominik Matus

92 posts in 606 days


#1 posted 06-26-2013 09:51 PM

I think it’s the same. We are using only blocks of wax in school.

-- Cabinetmaker, student of restoration

View lew's profile

lew

10100 posts in 2452 days


#2 posted 06-26-2013 11:04 PM

The stuff in the can may be combined with mineral oil to make it a little softer.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Pdub's profile

Pdub

895 posts in 1876 days


#3 posted 06-27-2013 02:58 PM

I use the block beeswax and mix it with mineral oil. Just melt the wax and mix with the oil. I put wax shavings in a container and place the container in a pot of boiling water, once melted mix the two. Word of advice, heat the mineral oil. I added wax to oil and the wax hardened before it was completely mixed. I had to throw it in the microwave and heat the mixture to remedy my problem.

-- Paul, North Dakota, USAF Ret.

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

392 posts in 965 days


#4 posted 07-24-2013 01:27 AM

I was able to get 70 lbs for $200 the grade a stuff.Dont know what im going to do with 70lbs but no more 8oz cans for $18 at woodcraft should save alot of money.

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

21 posts in 617 days


#5 posted 07-24-2013 02:10 AM

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

392 posts in 965 days


#6 posted 07-24-2013 02:52 AM

thanks I think the 70 pounds will last me a lifetime.

View Harry_Ch's profile

Harry_Ch

63 posts in 1372 days


#7 posted 07-24-2013 03:17 AM

Time to start experimenting with your own formulas and polish all the hosue furniture, Joseph. Took me almost a year to use up just one pound of beeswax and carnuba recipes. Just think of the profit margin you have there.

-- Deeds not Words.

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

414 posts in 1533 days


#8 posted 07-24-2013 03:31 AM

Are you all using beeswax as a polishing agent for the finished product???

I use beeswax in my assembly procedure and wash it out before staining. Beeswax is great for dealing with wood glue ooze out. When I finally get my joinery to where I want it, I dry fit the build and apply beeswax around all my joints while it is dry fitted, that way no wax gets into my joints, just around them. Once the wax is applied, I disassemble my dry fits, apply my glue, and set the clamps. The excess glue oozes out onto the beeswax… and I let it all dry. The next day, I peel off the oozed out glue, clean off the beeswax with denatured alcohol, and I’m good to stain.

Back to the thread topic… is beeswax good for a finish? I have always used a pate wax and it does a good job. But I’ve been learning woodworking for 30+ years and if you folks swear by your beeswax method… I’m game!

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 983 days


#9 posted 07-24-2013 04:16 AM

Bee sure to filter it through some cheese cloth before you use it. Mixing with mineral oil is good to do. here is a good sanding wax recipe; http://eddiecastelin.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/SandingWax.54184013.pdf

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

392 posts in 965 days


#10 posted 07-24-2013 04:18 AM

Aloha

I use the beeswax as a final polish heres my secret most laugh at me. This is for jewelery boxes I sand to 1500 then put gorilla glue as finish then sand again at 1500 lightly and polish with besswax.For jewelery boxes nothing beats the finish is like a mirror.some of my boxes go for 4k plus and sell easily the finish is amazing!

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2959 posts in 983 days


#11 posted 07-24-2013 04:30 AM

Joseph, The reason your gorilla glue works so well is because it’s sealing the pours and end grain. They do make end grain sealers that work better, have you tried any of them?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

392 posts in 965 days


#12 posted 07-24-2013 06:45 AM

Aloha Russell

Yes I have I am looking at a hour turn around.Yes I use the gorilla glue because it travels through the pours and makes it even stronger.And the price u cant beat i dont like other products.So far I have been able to out produce any person in this state with that finish as far as quality and price cant beat it.there r cheaper easier ways to do it but none are as nice to be honest each his own this is what works for me in mass production and quality.I have made over 5k boxes to date all still look as new as day made.One good plus you get gorilla arms with that finish!!mahalo

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

813 posts in 1762 days


#13 posted 07-24-2013 09:40 AM

@ Joseph are you talking about the stuff that foams like crazy?

After the wax is mixed with the mineral oil does it become more pliable? I got two blocks from my nephew who is a bee keeper and have been using it to lubricate wood to wood sliding joints like in drawers. Its tough in its solid form to get into tight spaces.

@ Bernie, when you use the wax for protecting the glue squeeze out, is it mixed version that you use or solid wax?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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