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Mahogany panel slightly warped.

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Forum topic by lateralus819 posted 06-24-2013 11:44 PM 555 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


06-24-2013 11:44 PM

I have a panel i just glued up, and one corner of the board is slightly bent outwards. I can apply minimal force myself and force it flat. Would this suffice in just using the fasteners for the top to hold it flat? Or should i remake it?

I saw it was kind of warped before i glued it and i tried to moisten it but it wasn’t so successful.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin


11 replies so far

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#1 posted 06-24-2013 11:55 PM

Just checked, its one corner that wants to float. I can press it down with little effort. I’m just debating on if i should just get some new lumber or use it.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#2 posted 06-24-2013 11:59 PM

Is it going in a frame or door, or is it a top? What thickness is it?

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#3 posted 06-25-2013 12:03 AM

Sorry, its for a hall table. It was .82”. Roughly 9/16” thick. After hand planing its about 3/4.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1713 days


#4 posted 06-25-2013 12:25 AM

I would use it, what have you got to lose?

or you could use your magic plane to add timber at the bottom Roughly 9/16” thick. After hand planing its about 3/4. and then straighten it out ;-)

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kdc68

2068 posts in 1021 days


#5 posted 06-25-2013 12:40 AM

+1 renners

Sorry, its for a hall table. It was .82”. Roughly 9/16” thick. After hand planing its about 3/4

.82” is a tick over 13/16”

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#6 posted 06-25-2013 12:42 AM

I’ve nothing to lose. But i hate dealing with inconsistency in the wood lol. I know it’s a problem I’ll have to overcome. I just fear something will happen over time. It’s a gift for my inlaws so I’d like to try and make it as sound as possible.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#7 posted 06-25-2013 12:43 AM

Doh…I’m not great at adding 16ths yet! Sorry. Yes it’s 13/16 not 9/16.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#8 posted 06-25-2013 12:45 AM

One thing i should add. When i bought the lumber it was 8’ long, had it cut in half. One half still had the wax on the end and i never trimmed it off, usually i try to. Would that cause moisture gain issues?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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Loren

7821 posts in 2392 days


#9 posted 06-25-2013 01:07 AM

It sounds like the end of the board is kinked. This
is common. With experience you learn to make
judgements in milling and gluing up boards which
break the rules about how you should flatten one
side, thickness the other and so forth.

In this situation however I think you might consider
ripping the glue-up and flattening the kinked
portion at least partially then gluing up again.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Nomad62

726 posts in 1702 days


#10 posted 06-25-2013 03:36 PM

Hard to be precise, of course, too many variables; but I would offer up that the wood wasn’t the same moisture as your work place, and it moved as it acclimated. Removing the outer surface may have aggravated it, like trying to slice thru case-hardened oak it could have uncovered unforeseen tension. It could also be that, as Loren stated, the wood was from an undesirable part of the log; if that section of the board was at the very base where the wood curls out, it is under non-removable tension, and I would deem it less that likely to stay put unless it can stay in 1 environment. If you use it, I’d suggest leaving it set for a couple of weeks anyway to move as it will then give it another go.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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lateralus819

1634 posts in 633 days


#11 posted 06-25-2013 08:01 PM

I purchased more lumber. It was warped before i started planing. The lumber is stored inside a warehouse thats cool. It’s very humid here. I made teh mistake of leaving it in my car yesterday in 90 degree heat. I’m sure that didn’t help. Usually all my lumber is in my house in a corner standing up.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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