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For Sale: Union planes

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Forum topic by Mark E. posted 06-24-2013 12:36 PM 7054 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


06-24-2013 12:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: union plane

(Update) Three of the planes have been sold. From the right in the first picture, the 2nd, 4th, and 6th are gone. Updated pictures in post #11.

I have a small collection of Union planes that I am looking to sell. Everything from tiny 5” block planes to the Union 6X with the patented depth adjuster.

The block planes are priced at $25-$30
The two No.3 size planes are $40 each. Both have smooth soles.
The three No.5 are $45 each. All three have corrugated soles.
The No.5A (same size as a Stanley 5-1/2) is $50. It has a corrugated sole.

The No.6X is $100. It also has a corrugated sole. The patented depth adjuster on this plane allows you to remove the iron or back it out of the mouth without losing the iron’s depth setting. Very handy.

The rabbet plane is a Union No.43, similar to Stanleys No.78. This one is priced at $45.

All of these planes perform as good as or better than comparable Stanleys (imo). They have been cleaned, lubricated and sharpened, ready to go to work.

If you have any questions or need additional pictures of any of these planes, just send me a PM.

I also have a bunch of Stanley planes for sale. Will post those as soon as I can get some pictures.

Shipping to be paid by buyer. I think most of these will fit in a small or medium flat rate USPS box.
Local pickup here in Willow Spring, NC is OK.

-- Mark


15 replies so far

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#1 posted 06-24-2013 01:14 PM

Well… I can’t find any harsh words for Union planes.

I’m looking to get a couple functional planes at reasonable prices, and these seem to fit the bill.

Looks like I’m your huckleberry.

I’ll take:

A block plane (smoothest cutter you have , please)
One #3 (the one with the zebrawood looking handles… Poor consideration? Am I a narcissist?)
One #5
The big girl #6X
And the number 43

Now I’d like anyone willing to critique my selection, to tell me if I’m putting together an inferior/less useful/unnecessary selection, and what other planes are must have, as well as if any of these should be left off a beginner’s list until later.

Do you accept PayPal?

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#2 posted 06-24-2013 02:26 PM

Let me give you some pictures to help with your decision.

This (imo) is the best of the block planes

The No.3 with the zebrawood knob and tote. The knob and tote were shop made by the previous owner. They are nice and smooth, in perfect condition and look really cool. The iron on this one is un-marked. It is not a union iron. It is tapered , getting thicker at the cutting edge. I was told at some point that the tapered irons were made by Ohio Tool(?). This plane has the early lateral adjuster with the raised bump above the pivot point.

Of the three No.5, this is the one I would take. It has a chip missing from the toe of the tote where the front screw hole is located. There is a washer under the screw holding it down and it is nice a solid.

Not sure if you could see this in the other pictures. The tote on the 6X is missing most of the horn.

I do take PayPal.

I will have to figure out the best way to ship these. I don’t think they will all fit in a large flat rate box.

-- Mark

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#3 posted 06-24-2013 03:55 PM

134 views and no one chimes in. I feel I might be being hasty here. However, looking into comparable planes seems to reveal that these are reasonably priced.

Looking at the horn of the 6X I think I’ll pass on that one. Perhaps that is a trivial concern, but nevertheless, I may need to consider resale value. If I don’t take to hand planing, or decide to upgrade, I need to consider.

Can you describe the condition as well as the uses for the rabbeting plane? I wanted to use a plane for tennoning, and it seems hefty for such a purpose. Someone else had mentioned a shoulder plane, and I’m not up on terminology sufficiently to understand any differences.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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JayT

4776 posts in 1673 days


#4 posted 06-24-2013 04:14 PM

Buckethead,

A good working assortment of planes will vary depending on your expected use. If you use mostly power tools and machinery, then a good block and smoother (#3 or 4) may be all you need. If starting with rough sawn lumber and using mostly hand tools, add a jack (#5) and jointer (usually a #7 or 8, though a #6 works for shorter boards) to that for squaring and dimensioning.

The rabbeting plane works decently for just that, rabbets. I suppose it could be made to work for tenon faces, but the blade set up and angle isn’t good for the end grain on shoulders. You are going to want a shoulder plane for that purpose.

Union planes are very good quality and will serve you nicely. IMHO, the prices are fair for planes that are tuned and ready to go. Decide what you need and go forth. (Just remember that planes can be a slippery slope of purchases & collecting. I started with just a couple not that long ago and now have a couple dozen)

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#5 posted 06-24-2013 04:26 PM

Thanks for the response!

I might be getting ahead of myself, but I do want to put together machines and hand tools. Rabbeting and other more voluminous tasks I will more likely do with a table saw or router. I do want to try my hand at hand jointing though. Reading up a bit, I do see that a #7 or #8 might be more forgiving, therefore more appropriate for a beginner.

The big question, hand planing rough sawn to s4s: Feasible for a beginner? I do understand there will be a learning curve, but I’d like to know if anyone even bothers anymore. Haven’t seen any discussion on it, but haven’t searched either.

I dropped the ball on a 12” delta thickness planer for $50 on CL. I’m taking it a signal from the universe to either do hand planing, or to tighten up when I find a potential bargain.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#6 posted 06-24-2013 04:50 PM

Okay Mark. I’d like to pare the order down to the block plane you suggested, the #3 with zebra, and the #5 you suggested. Let me know how to send payment, either by PM or through your blog, eBay or what ever means you use. I’ll settle up as soon as I get back from errands.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#7 posted 06-24-2013 05:05 PM

Very good information from JayT, especially the slippery slope.

A rabbeting plane is probably not the best tool to use for tenons. Rabbet planes are designed to one task really well.

If you haven’t already read it, you should look at Patrick Leach's Blood and Gore.

If you decide that you do want a rabbet plane I also have a Stanley No.78 available that has the depth stop and the fence.

FWIW. I had a young man stop by the shop on Saturday. He didn’t know exactly what he wanted, he just knew that he wanted to get started with hand planes. We spent a couple of hours playing with most of the sizes and types that I have in the shop. He ended up buying a No.3 smoother and a No.5 jack plane. That seems to me to be a pretty good starter set for a beginner.

-- Mark

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#8 posted 06-24-2013 05:06 PM

Looks like I was writing while you were posting.

Let me check on best shipping and I’ll get back to you in a PM.

-- Mark

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sikrap

1121 posts in 2821 days


#9 posted 06-24-2013 05:28 PM

I would not badmouth Union planes. IMHO, they can work every bit as well as Stanley. The only drawback is that parts are not as readily available as Stanley are. I think you made a good choice with the ones you chose, as far as a “starter” set goes. :)) There are some that mill their lumber using hand tools and for smaller pieces the #5 will work well.When you get into larger pieces or want to start jointing by hand, you will want a 7 or 8, depending on how much weight you want to push around.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#10 posted 06-24-2013 06:12 PM

For parts for planes there is a guy on eBay with user name nhplaneparts. He usually has around 1,000 or so parts for sale at any given point in time. All of his sales are ‘buy it now’ and his prices are usually very reasonable with reasonable shipping. If you need more than one item he will combine shipping to save you a couple of dollars.

A great resource for keeping your planes up and running.

-- Mark

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#11 posted 06-25-2013 09:49 PM

Here is an updated picture of what I have left. I do have a couple more that I have not looked at yet to assess condition.

-- Mark

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#12 posted 06-27-2013 10:12 PM

I received an email today stating that my planes would most likely be delivered today. I was working, and for a few moments found myself wanting to call it a day. :-)

So being finish day, an office opening for business on Monday, moving in tomorrow and over the weekend, I had to tough it out.

Well… I arrive home and sure enough… A parcel!

What could it be?

Oh my goodness! Three beautiful hand planes!

Thank you Mark, for sending them so promptly, packing them so well, and communicating so diligently!

Your efforts are not unnoticed.

Now to figure out how to make shavings!

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#13 posted 06-28-2013 11:10 AM

Glad they made it unscathed. From the looks of that box, it was bumpy ride.

Making shavings is easy, just slide them over a chunk of wood. :)

-- Mark

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#14 posted 06-30-2013 12:23 PM

One more No.5 has been spoken for. There is one left.

-- Mark

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Mark E.

387 posts in 3205 days


#15 posted 07-15-2013 12:56 PM

The No.43 plane has been spoken for.

-- Mark

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