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3 Craftsman lathe tools(plus 2)-good deal?

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Forum topic by CFrye posted 06-24-2013 09:28 AM 1654 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CFrye

3674 posts in 564 days


06-24-2013 09:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe tools question

These tools are up for sale locally for $30 To be honest I don’t even own a lathe! Husband and I are seriously considering buying one. Anyway, if these are good, it’d be a step in the right direction. The seller lists them as ”$30 3 are Craftsman Professional brand #’s 2856, 2858 and 2862 USA made all very nice condition” I cannot find these on Sears website and ebay prices are all over the board. I go look at them on Tuesday. Thank you in advance for anything that will help me make an informed decision.
CFrye

-- God bless, Candy


19 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1183 posts in 859 days


#1 posted 06-24-2013 12:54 PM

http://www.harborfreight.com/8-piece-high-speed-steel-wood-lathe-chisel-set-69723.html

http://www.pennstateind.com/store/woodturning-tools.html

I had a few Craftsman tools from that era, a roughing gouge & couple of skew chisels, bought at my local Sears on sale. Cannot remember when Sears stop selling them. While not a bad price, you can buy new tools for not much more money.

Might want to think about what you want to turn on a lathe before buying tool sets. Harbor Freight sells inexpensive spindle turning sets, might want to stay away from their $20 set. Penn State sells both sets and individual tools. Think buying individual tools works out better because only buy tools actually need.

Plenty of free turning videos on the internet about lathes, turning tools, sharpening tools, spindle and bowl turning.

You might also look at these folk offer discounts for buying ywo or three tools at a time and like other links have free catalogs.

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com

http://www.packardwoodworks.com

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3938 posts in 2387 days


#2 posted 06-24-2013 01:53 PM

Bill is right … don’t start buying tools until you figure out what you might want to do with them. I don’t know anything about these specific tools, but a lot of old Craftsman tools that pop up on CraigsList, garage sales, etc. are carbon steel (as opposed to high speed steel (HSS)). Carbon steel tools work okay, but don’t hold the edge the way HSS does.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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CFrye

3674 posts in 564 days


#3 posted 06-24-2013 02:23 PM

Yes, you are both right. I am interested in doing bowls and vases, not sure about hubby. What would be good starter tools with those projects in mind?
Will it say on the tool if it is carbon steel vs HSS or is there some indicator I can look for? The seller also told me they are 14” long. The metal part seems kind of short in proportion to the handle. Is there a purpose/reason for that?
I really appreciate the input!

-- God bless, Candy

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TheDane

3938 posts in 2387 days


#4 posted 06-24-2013 02:31 PM

HSS tools are generally marked HSS … don’t know about carbon steel, but if they are not marked HSS< there is a pretty good chance they are not.

These look more like spindle turning (or pen turning) tools … I can’t tell from the picture, but it doesn’t look like there is anything resembling a bowl gouge.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1183 posts in 859 days


#5 posted 06-24-2013 02:56 PM

Main reason metal part on some of those tools look short is sharpening. HHS tools either etched or stenciled into metal.

I recommend buying individual tools over tool sets because will end up with only those tools need.

For bowl turning might only need a few tools. Also depends on size of lathe ¼”. 3/8”, or ½” bowl gouge, ¾” or 1” round nose scraper, and 1/8” parting tool.

For spindle turning ¾” roughing gouge, 3/8” or ½” spindle gouge, ½” or ¾” skew chisel, and parting tool.

One reason listed Penn State, they sell inexpensive Benjamin’s Best turning tools individually or in sets. They also sell some carbide tools. Might waste a lot of steel learning to sharpen your tools so good choice for starting out.

Craft Supplies & Packard Woodworks sell all you major brands including carbide tools if want them.

Cannot really sharpen carbide tools, so popular with lots of beginners that don’t know or want to bother learning how to sharpen turning tools. Carbide tools also popular with experienced turners that know how to sharpen their tools. You have to replace carbide tips when dull, so have never bothered with them.

-- Bill

View Porchfish's profile

Porchfish

579 posts in 1257 days


#6 posted 06-24-2013 04:02 PM

C Frye, Hello my friend and I wish only that you have a positive experience in becoming one of the many “Lumberjock” turners. With that being said, Please Stay away from Harbor Freight lathe tools, your face and eyes will thank you ! The Craftsman tools are decent little tools, made long before the rise in popularity of high speed steels. These little fellas will come in handy for getting started. The degree of usefulness will be determined by the type of turning you are looking forward to becoming proficient in. If your initial work will be turning “between centers”, then these will be useful for getting started. If you are aiming toward vessel turning, there may only be one or two small scrapers and a parting tool in that group that would be useful! What ever you do, please stay away from Cheaper Chinese tools where the quality and durability of the tool steel is a genuine crap-shoot ! You only have one pretty face and two eyes… I have seen the results of poorly tempered steel tools containing too much carbon, shattering in a craftsman’s hands . Don’t be a statistic ! There are many catalogs offering single tools to fit individual jobs. Check those out and make do with fewer tools when starting out. An old adage, “Cheap things are expensive” and “you get what you pay for” have never been proved false, even in todays “crap will do” attitudes ! don’t pay for trouble ! Enjoy your start into the world of turning with fewer good quality tools ! Good luck to you !

-- If it smells good, eat it ! The pig caught under the fence is the one doing all thesquealing

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3938 posts in 2387 days


#7 posted 06-24-2013 04:58 PM

FWIW … I started out with a 6 piece set of Everex tools (a ShopFox label). Not the best, but not the worst either. Since then, I have bought some individual tools from PSI (Benjamin’s Best). I went this way to learn how to sharpen … I didn’t want to grind up expensive steel.

Now I am changing directions … I am comfortable sharpening, have taken some classes, and belong to a very active turning club. I think I have learned enough about sharpening and my individual needs to start buying quality tools, so my next tool purchase will be a bowl gouge, most likely from either Lyle Jamieson or Dave Schweitzer. Their tools aren’t cheap (if you would have told me a couple of years ago I would be willing to pay almost $100 for a gouge with no handle, I would have questioned your sanity), but I am convinced they are superb quality that I will be happy with for a long time.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1183 posts in 859 days


#8 posted 06-24-2013 07:42 PM

Porchfish please see note at bottom of chart on page 2 of 3.

http://www.woodturninglearn.net/articles/ToolSteel.pdf

Most of the HSS turning tool steel coming out of China today. Production of HSS steel in UK, pretty much a thing of the past. If you consider cutting to length and grinding a bevel and handle on tools manufacturing not much can argue about that. Now production of exotics steel (powdered metal cryogenic steels) in Sheffield is up.

No, matter what kind of steel your tool is made of will need re-sharpening. I like some carbon steel tools because leaves a smoother surface on wood (roughing gouge & Skew). I like my 1990’s HSS tools better than those bought in 2000s. My 5/8” Crown M2 bowl gouge leaves a better surface than 5/8” Thompson bowl gouge. Both gouges excel in removing wood fast. Feel my Taylor M2 ½ skew much better than my ½” KRYO.

How long a tool holds an edge really depends upon wood species and mineral/resin content, when in doubt sharpen your tools.

-- Bill

View moke's profile

moke

538 posts in 1501 days


#9 posted 06-25-2013 05:10 PM

I recently bought an entire set of Craftsman HSS tools for the 90’s I believe is was $30 with shipping. It had 8 tools and I really only bought it because it had a 1.5” skew and I had intended to throw the rest in a drawer, but I tried them and the are really nice tools….I might seriously consider those for the price.
mike

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3674 posts in 564 days


#10 posted 06-25-2013 08:46 PM

I want to thank each and everyone of you for taking the time to answer. These were not HSS and I have decided not to buy them. (I really WANT them but will curb my Gear Acquisition Syndrome, for now)! I have A LOT to learn about turning. It’s good to know there is help here when I need it. Thanks again. Lumberjocks Rocks

-- God bless, Candy

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3544 posts in 2685 days


#11 posted 06-25-2013 09:23 PM

Though not considered high value, I have a pretty good assortment of the old C’man lathe tools.
I consider them a value, and I use them a bunch ‘cause they are easily sharpend for different tasks.
Don’t pass ‘em by if they are pretty inexpensive.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1378 posts in 908 days


#12 posted 06-25-2013 09:43 PM

The small diamond-shaped parting tool from the Craftsman set actually gets a lot of use on my lathe. But otherwise there isn’t anything special about these tools that would make it worth anyone’s while to buy before you had a lathe.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3674 posts in 564 days


#13 posted 06-25-2013 09:48 PM

Bill and Ian, I do consider these a good value. However, since I do not have a lathe as yet, I will spend the money on wood for jigs that I can use now. Currently on my ‘List’ are TS sled, drill press table, and a miter sled for the TS. Thanks for commenting.

-- God bless, Candy

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 751 days


#14 posted 06-26-2013 03:19 PM

Harbor Freight has 2 sets of lathe tools, and they go on sale fairly regularly, so get on their mailing list and watch for coupons or sale flyers. The first set is inexpensive and feels very light in the hands. The 2nd set costs just a little more but each tool weighs about twice what the ones in the light set weigh and they look to be of the same size shape, configuration. I think when I bought them the light weight set was like $40 and the heavy set was $60. The Heavier set felt better in my hands and better balanced.

View Cole Tallerman's profile

Cole Tallerman

392 posts in 909 days


#15 posted 06-27-2013 04:21 AM

I have those tools that i got for free and so far they have been great. They are on the smaller side and use thinner metal then some of the higher end ones but they are a great starter set.

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