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Chisel grinding

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Forum topic by Mark posted 06-19-2013 12:45 AM 660 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

455 posts in 671 days


06-19-2013 12:45 AM

I see a lot of comments about hollow ground vs flat ground on chisels (and plane blades). While not wanting to start a war or any thing. Is there a preference? I usually hollow grind my chisels, then add a small bevel near the end. Couldn’t tell you what angle they are, but they’re damn sharp. I use them mostly for mortices.
Thank you.

-- Mark


3 replies so far

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Loren

7746 posts in 2344 days


#1 posted 06-19-2013 01:38 AM

For mortise chisels a micro-bevel is standard, unless
they are laminated Japan chisels.

There’s a lot of fuss about sharpening methods –
but in my experience pounding dulls sharp edges
quickly and the only tools that practically need
very, very sharp edges are paring chisels, smooth
planes and joinery planes.

That said, it seems to me that on a jack used for
carpentry for example, where sharpness is not that
critical, the iron will stay working well a good while
longer if it is honed finely. You don’t need a fine
cut in carpentry, but the edge seems to last longer.

I hollow grind most of the time. I hollow grind my
Japan chisels too, but they are rather basic but
good ones they were bringing over in the 1990s.
I do not micro-bevel them though.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Mark's profile

Mark

455 posts in 671 days


#2 posted 06-19-2013 03:30 AM

Loren. I see a fair number of mortising chisels that are flat ground. I’m thinking this may have something to do with added strength on the edge???

-- Mark

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Loren

7746 posts in 2344 days


#3 posted 06-19-2013 03:55 AM

Yeah, but they usually are honed with a microbevel,
the rest of the chisel depth is there to provide
registration and stiffness. Sash mortise chisels
are more maneuverable than pigstickers and
registered chisels more maneuverable still.

I hollow grind my registered chisels and don’t usually
micro-bevel them. Sash chisels I micro-bevel because
I don’t see any point in hollow-grinding them -
the hollow grind relieves material which makes the
main bevel easier to hone as the material in the
middle is absent and not there to act as an accidental
fulcrum. In single-bevel honing, the hollow grind
allows quicker honing and somewhat more forgiving
technique.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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