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Ridgid palm router accessories?

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Forum topic by lateralus819 posted 06-17-2013 12:18 AM 6782 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1353 days


06-17-2013 12:18 AM

So i just picked up the ridgid palm router to do some inlay and other smaller tasks, and it’s nice that it comes with a guide and 2 plates, but are their any other accessories available or is this it? Should it be a deal breaker? I was actually going to get the bosch colt but neither lowes or home depot had it in stock.


7 replies so far

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NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2041 days


#1 posted 06-17-2013 01:35 AM

Not a deal breaker IMHO.
I have three of the ridgid r2401 trimmers and love them.
Ridgid could make a killing by releasing a plunge base for it, but so far they haven’t jumped on the bandwagon yet. I haven’t needed anything more than what they came with aside from a shop made sub-base that accepts bushings.

Aside from the plunge base, the ridgid is nicer than the colt IMHO.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 2328 days


#2 posted 06-17-2013 01:50 AM

Its rare that you will hear anything negative said about this router, but I believe its outdated and compared to what else is available, over-rated.

I too was disappointed to find out that no after-market accessories exist for the Ridgid trim router.

On top of that, you have to purchase seperately, a bottom plate that was designed for the model previous to this,
if you want to use template guides. This puts the price at around 110 dollars. Or you can make your own base, but its still going to add to the cost and inconvenience .

I almost returned my Ridgid and purchased the Makita that was on sale for 89 dollars. The Makita has more power , a quick change out motor base for plunge base, off-set base and angle base, and a dust collection port. It comes with an edge guide and a universal base.

Many of our tools in our shops are valued for not what they can do by themselves , but by adding to them to increase there versatility.

A trim router that cannot be upgraded with accessories is missing the boat in my opinion.

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RonInOhio

720 posts in 2328 days


#3 posted 06-17-2013 07:21 AM

Aside from some of my complaints above, the Ridgid does have an LED light that will come in handy
for inlay work. Something the Makita doesn’t have.

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1712 days


#4 posted 06-17-2013 04:24 PM

I actually prefer a larger router for inlay. The bigger base and heavier router is easier to control (for me anyway). I do the outline with my larger router and use the ridgid to clean things up. I use the ridgid all the time for breaking edges with a small roundover bit. In fact I think I may get another one strictly for that task.

If you wanted to use the router without a plunge mechanism, it’s not a deal breaker. Chuck up a forstner bit in the drill press and make a small hole to start your router bit in

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4855 posts in 2277 days


#5 posted 06-17-2013 04:58 PM

1+ I tend to use a 2 hp router for inlay.

I have the older version of the Bosch Colt, and it is pretty basic. Good for trimming, roundovers, and hinge mortising, but not much more. My old Bosch doesn’t accept guide bushings either.

If I needed a trim router with plunge base, I would look at the Dewalt.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1574 days


#6 posted 06-17-2013 08:08 PM

If I needed a trim router with plunge base, I would look at the Dewalt.

If you mean the DW611, it’s not a trim router, it’s a compact router. I have both the DW611, and the R2401, and they aren’t exactly interchangeable. There’s a decent amount of overlap, but there are things each does well that the other doesn’t. To me, the R2401 is more a much improved take on the DW26670 PC7310, or Bosch 1608, than a competitor to the DW611.

I really like the R2401 for freehand cleaning dovetail socket and pin boards, including at the tops of legs and half laps. The depth setting pack and pinion is terrific! The 611’s depth setting isn’t as good, and it’s fatter and heavier.

The DW611 is often my go-to handheld router. For many years, lots of handheld routers were only 1 to 1 1/4 HP, and were much lighter and nimbler. It was nice to see DeWalt bring this tool to market.

Since I bought the 611, there are not a whole lot of handheld jobs where I reach my larger PC and Bosch tools. Lots of the heavier stuff gets done on the router table, so I sold some of my larger handhelds to people who can use them.

Don’t forget, it’s easy to whip up Lexan or MDF specialty bases for any router. For lots of jobs, a quickie shop-made base can make a small router super stable.

MicroFence makes a FANTASTIC plunge base for many trim and compact routers, but bring money…

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2041 days


#7 posted 06-17-2013 08:55 PM

+1 to what barry said.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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