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Salvage split pot?

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Forum topic by Octavius posted 407 days ago 622 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


407 days ago

This spalted wood is very cool so am prepared to do whatever is necessary to repair the splits.

I don’t know, carpenters glue mixed with fine saw dust? Don’t they sell a gap-filling epoxy?

Or should I just move on.

Cheers!


15 replies so far

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 978 days


#1 posted 407 days ago

If it were me i would move on. it looks like you have quite a few other checks and cracks that could probably come apart as you are further along in the turning. Is this green wood you are turning?

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


#2 posted 407 days ago

Thanks for the reply.

It came from a dead dogwood that I cut down a couple of weeks ago. It feels quite dry and the shaving are not wet at all. Dogwood is only a small tree so that is basically the trunk we are looking at with the bark removed. I’ve a 50/50 success rate on this tree and another dogwood I cut down years ago. The conventional wisdom is that the trunk should be quartered otherwise checks are inevitable.

I cut down a small oak a while back and that thing checked just looking at it.

Dogwood is my favorite wood for turning by far so far – it gives a very smooth finish – one pot I made almost looks/feels like porcelain.

Cheers!

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 978 days


#3 posted 407 days ago

Dogwood is also great for carving. gives very clean and smooth results. such a shame it stays so small. some guys use CA glue to glue it but it looks like you might be doing that a few more times as you go on unless the one crack relieved enough stress that the rest of it will be fine. I’m not very experienced in turning yet so i always error on the side of caution.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3658 posts in 2265 days


#4 posted 407 days ago

Get some 30-miute epoxy, mix in some sawdust from the shavings you made when you turned this, and fill the cracks.

When you fill cracks that are as wide as this, it is advisable to put duct tape or masking tape on one side of the crack, or you will have epoxy all over your bench, your shop, and yourself. Don’t ask me how I know.

If you want to jazz it up, mix something other than sawdust into the epoxy. One of my buds goes to a locksmith shop and picks up the filings from their key-making machine. He mixes that into epoxy, sands and finishes for a real nice effect. He also uses crushed stone (like turquoise) for some of his stuff.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 978 days


#5 posted 407 days ago

Is that before or after being done turning it? Sounds like that would tear up a gouge edge trying to finish the piece with metal or stone in the epoxy.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


#6 posted 407 days ago

Thanks the Dane – I’m on it.

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TheDane

3658 posts in 2265 days


#7 posted 407 days ago

OnlyJustME … You would do the epoxy first (overfill the gap a bit), then finish turning when it is cured. The epoxy may be a little cloudy when you turn it, but when you apply the finish (lacquer, shellac, poly, etc.) it should look good.

I didn’t put any ‘accents’ in it, but this bowl has a load of epoxy that was used to fill voids:
Click for details

P.S. I expected the pith to crack or warp in the bowl referenced above, but so far, so good. I finished it about 8 months ago so I think I dodged the bullet.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2446 posts in 953 days


#8 posted 407 days ago

I like to fill cracks like that w/ epoxy and abalone shell, rather than trying to hide them accentuate them. It won’t harm your tools.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 978 days


#9 posted 407 days ago

cool.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


#10 posted 405 days ago

Thanks again The Dane – I salvaged the pot for my pens. Big crack is to the left. No abalone, sorry Bondo, just sawdust/epoxy.

Cheers!

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5272 posts in 2187 days


#11 posted 405 days ago

I would advise you to throw away or burn these pieces of badly split wood.
I nearly lost my thumb and spent 10 days AND MANY hours of micro surgery and wore metal clamps etc for weeks all is ok now but hey it’s just not worthg the chance imho. SO I SAY definitely not that is my advice. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


#12 posted 405 days ago

Oh, wow. I’m sorry to hear that Alistair. I’m glad they could save your thumb but it must have been a horrible experience.
Regards.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

957 posts in 736 days


#13 posted 404 days ago

There is a saying in woodturning community about not turning junk wood. Agreeing more and more with that statement due to safety concerns and time wasted. Because have been there and done that.

Filling voids and cracks just not for me unless it adds to aesthetics of the piece. Only an amateur would call attention to flaws in piece of wood without adding to overall composition.

Yes, still try to salvage a piece when unexpected flaws in wood show up. If cannot turn away that flaw safely, just leave it alone or toss it.

I am not advocating do not try to salvage a piece, just evaluate safety and final look of the piece. Here is a few examples of time wasters with all their flaws.

-- Bill

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Octavius

51 posts in 1775 days


#14 posted 404 days ago

Thanks for your voice of experience, Bill.
Unfortunate, isn’t it, that the “junk” wood is the most interesting in terms of figure, imperfections, etc.
Cheers!

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Wildwood

957 posts in 736 days


#15 posted 404 days ago

Grain orientation can help a lot too!

I have turned a lot of spalted wood. I personally would not have continued turning your piece of wood into a pen cup for two reasons. One, wood not really interesting and second would always see that split. Yes, you did a remarkable save and serves the purpose for which intended.

Take a look at some better examples of spalted wood turned items.
https://www.google.com/search?site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=652&q=spalted+wood+turnings&oq=spalted+wood+turnings&gs_l=img.3...1047.6631.0.6922.21.10.0.11.11.0.128.1190.0j10.10.0...0.0...1ac.1.17.img.hS8tznwMh80

-- Bill

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