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Using CA glue

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 305 days ago 574 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

2393 posts in 1742 days


305 days ago

I want to use CA glue to seal end grain and the edges of plywood (Baltic Birch). What is the best way to do this. If I were to use a brush, the bristles would be glued to the wood, right? Would dipping the wood into the CA work?


12 replies so far

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

256 posts in 1534 days


#1 posted 305 days ago

i would something else, CA i think would be kind of expensive to use for this, shellac or lacquer would work and dry fast

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MrRon

2393 posts in 1742 days


#2 posted 305 days ago

I’m building models using 1/2” Baltic Birch and will be drilling 1/8” dia holes in the end grain. The holes are 1/4” through holes. I don’t want the BB to delaminate, so the area involved is quite small. Someone else recommended CA, so I thought I would go with that.

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

3845 posts in 791 days


#3 posted 305 days ago

I use CA glue (thin variety as opposed to the thick type) on the ends of BB for dovetail drawers cut with my Leigh jig. It helps but is not a total solution for avoiding blow out. Titebond sells larger sizes which help cut the cost. My approach is to set the sides/back/front on end between a couple of 2xs to apply to the top end grains with the applicator bottle the CA comes in, leaving the BB pieces vertical for an hour or overnight, and then doing the other end. Simple but a little time consuming. I usually try to do this on evenings during the week when my shop time is at a minimum due to work.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Benvolio's profile

Benvolio

126 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 305 days ago

on a related note – does anyone know the correct solvent for thinning CA glue??

-- Ben, England.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9530 posts in 1189 days


#5 posted 305 days ago

Seems to me that epoxy would be a lot quicker, cheaper,and stronger.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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HillbillyShooter

3845 posts in 791 days


#6 posted 305 days ago

My thought was that epoxy would be thicker and capillary action would not soak the glue as deep into the end grain as the capillary action would carry a thin CA glue. Using 1/2”BB, the CA should soak down the right depth for a dovetail joint. JMHO.

PS. The stores carry a solvent for CA glue; otherwise I’d probably start with acetone.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9530 posts in 1189 days


#7 posted 305 days ago

I misunderstood your need to get that much penetration so I agree that epoxy won’t go that deep. But I don’t think CA will either.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

3845 posts in 791 days


#8 posted 305 days ago

Actually, after posting I remembered the idea for using CA glue like I mentioned originated from the construction details shared by another LJ:

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/71665

As I often observe, there are very few new ideas—just a lot of rediscovered ones.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3365 posts in 879 days


#9 posted 304 days ago

Acetone is the solvent for CA but I have no idea if it can be used properly as a thinner.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3249 posts in 1867 days


#10 posted 304 days ago

I have used wall board patching compound (spackling paste) which works fine if you are going to paint the edges. I put it on with a putty knife and after it dries, sand it and paint it!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1455 posts in 2624 days


#11 posted 299 days ago

You can get some pretty amazingly thin epoxies (look in the rot repair section of your hardware store, they make super runny epoxy that’s made to soak into wood).

I use the runny CA for gap filling all the time, and I’d just put that edge of the plywood up and pour the CA on it. Then maybe use some parallel jaw clamps to squeeze the heck out of the plywood in that area.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View brtech's profile

brtech

643 posts in 1422 days


#12 posted 299 days ago

I don’t think CA sticks to silicone, so you might be able to use a silicone brush. Dipping clearly works. Thin CA is like water, and wicks like water.

You can’t thin CA with acetone. It’s a solvent, but not a thinner. If your CA is thick because it’s old, throw it away,
the problem is irreversible.

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