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how to mix mixol tints

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Forum topic by shelly_b posted 06-13-2013 04:17 PM 3583 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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shelly_b

848 posts in 834 days


06-13-2013 04:17 PM

Hi, I am making a cabinet/armoire for a coworker. He gave me a pic from a magazine of what he wanted it to look like. This has a very light teal colored paint, but we decided to tint/stain it that color instead so the grain will show through. I bought some mixol tints. Does anyone have any experience on mixing these? I tried putting it straight in the poly, but didn’t mix well. It mixed it water, but when used on maple it got really blotchy. I have wood conditioner, but it’s only for use with oil based stains. I am going to try on poplar and hope for better luck without blotching. Have I mentioned I hate finishing? I really hope it gets easier for me! I wish I could just clear coat or oil everything. Thanks!


27 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1630 days


#1 posted 06-13-2013 04:22 PM

”...Have I mentioned I hate finishing?...”

You and me both Shelly! I can’t help you on this one, BUT I am looking to do the same thing on my next project, a couple of skinny Amish Cabinets. I look forward to seeing how this thread turns out. Good luck…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1293 days


#2 posted 06-13-2013 04:32 PM

I mixed mixol in water based poly (crystalac). It came out fine, but the colors are lighter than mixing paints.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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Monte Pittman

15048 posts in 1054 days


#3 posted 06-13-2013 04:36 PM

I have not used those dyes so I can’t help you there. If you find anyone that says finishing is their favorite part, they’re lying. Good luck.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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a1Jim

112484 posts in 2293 days


#4 posted 06-13-2013 05:01 PM

I think you forgot about Charles Neil Monte :)) Shelly,Monte and others for $12 a month Charles Neil has a on line class on finishing plus a forum where you can ask questions and he will answer any questions you have in a very timely manner. As with most of Charles products and on line classes has a money back no questions asked policy I assume it’s the same with this class. That’s less than a gallon of many finishes you might buy. I’m a member and I have learned a lot already.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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shelly_b

848 posts in 834 days


#5 posted 06-13-2013 05:02 PM

Thanks guys:) It mixed well it water, but I am worried that if the poplar doesn’t work because of the green in it, that I will have to use maple, which will splotch really bad with a water based dye…unless there is a way to condition it first. The poly I mixed it with had an amber tint, so it kind of messed up the color, and it didn’t mix well anyway. I think it may dissolve a little better if I let it sit for a while, but that doesn’t fix the amber tint. Thanks again!

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shelly_b

848 posts in 834 days


#6 posted 06-13-2013 05:04 PM

Thanks Jim! I will definately look into that! I would really like to learn as much as I can about finishing so I can enjoy it:) I would also like to use this project as an excuse to buy an airless finishing system since it is such a big cabinet, so I will need some training on that also lol.

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shelly_b

848 posts in 834 days


#7 posted 06-13-2013 05:06 PM

Of all the wood I have, I don’t have any poplar or maple, so I am going to lowes to grab a little poplar board to do some samples on. I will post pics of how it turns out.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112484 posts in 2293 days


#8 posted 06-13-2013 05:13 PM

Shelly poplar and maple an other woods tend to blotch because they have a combination of hard and soft wood so the the wood tends to absorb the stain or finish diffidently.What needs to be done is those woods need a pre-conditioner before staining or dying. There are a number of things you can use such as a 1 Lb cut of shellac ,a store bought pre-conditioner but I’ve found the Blotch control that Charles Neil makes works best.

Here’s a link for Charles Neil’s finishing class

http://www.cn-woodworking.com/finishing-class/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Finisherman

209 posts in 566 days


#9 posted 06-13-2013 09:45 PM

Hi Shelly:

I’m a little bit of a “strange animal.” I love finishing! A1Jim is right. Maple and poplar do tend to blotch. Charles Neil’s blotch control works well on these woods. If you’re thinking of getting a spray system, I’d go with a turbine-driven HVLP system. In that case, you can spray light, dry coats of the dye, mixed with water or denatured alcohol, onto your surface. This should help to minimize your blotching problems. I second the idea that attending Charles Neil’s might help you with your finishing. If you want to, you can send me a PM and I’ll be happy to help you in whatever way I can. Of course, you can also PM Charles Neil, and I’m sure that he’d be happy to help you, too.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2232 posts in 2263 days


#10 posted 06-13-2013 10:16 PM

We are forced to do finish work fairly regularly, like it or not. A recent customer insisted on a stained finish and insisted on Maple. I actually use mixol products a good bit, but I can say that Transtint Dye will mix better than mixol products. I primarily use black (Transtint, to darken), brown (#3) and red colors. I tend to mix most of my colors in my sanding sealer and sometimes will mix into my top coat lacquers.

As stated already, these colors can be mixed in a mixture of water and denatured alcohol and that might be what will work nicely for you.

I used to use Poly but do not use poly anymore, we just use lacquers. Let us know how it goes.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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Jerry

2232 posts in 2263 days


#11 posted 06-13-2013 10:48 PM

A good source for dye products: http://www.homesteadfinishingproducts.com/htdocs/stains.htm

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

904 posts in 826 days


#12 posted 06-13-2013 10:52 PM

On blotchy woods, often the nicest color changes are obtained by tinting a clear coat, and spraying layers of the tinted clear until the desired color depth is achieved.

Think “Candy paint” on a custom car… It’s a tinted clear sprayed over a silver, gold, or copper metallic base coat.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

921 posts in 1033 days


#13 posted 06-14-2013 12:59 AM

I use Mixol pigments but not for tinting stains or finishes. Transtint or some other dye solutions tend to do a better job in this realm. Pigments tend to obscure the grain whereas dyes do not.

The Mixols I do like for doing little touch-up and repair work. I tend to put a few different colors onto a palette and blend them to the right color. At that point I’ll add a few drops of shellac to the mixture and paint thin coats of semi-translucent color over defects. It’s a good way to rescue a finish after discovering a glue spot under the first coat of lacquer.

My business partner once “repaired” a veneered surface that had been nearly sanded through over a 6” wide area. There was just enough veneer present that the addition of some lines of pigment was enough to make it look normal. Only those of us in the know could spot the damaged area.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View shelly_b's profile

shelly_b

848 posts in 834 days


#14 posted 06-14-2013 01:27 AM

Thanks everyone! I am definately going to take Charles Neil’s class. So far I have applied a water mixture, and a minwax stain tint base with mixol on poplar. Like Jim said, there were areas that looked good, and some that blotched. I treated with minwax wood conditioner for water based stains(which I didn’t know they made) and that helped, but there was still an absorbtion difference. I am going to try to mix the color in shellac since I also picked some up that is clear. I think the easiest thing to do would be a tinted top coat, as long as I can get it to mix right. Time to go back out and see if there were any changes now that it’s dry! Thanks:)

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2010 posts in 993 days


#15 posted 06-14-2013 01:30 AM

Shelly poplar and maple an other woods tend to blotch because they have a combination of hard and soft wood so the the wood tends to absorb the stain or finish diffidently.What needs to be done is those woods need a pre-conditioner before staining or dying. There are a number of things you can use such as a 1 Lb cut of shellac ,a store bought pre-conditioner but I’ve found the Blotch control that Charles Neil makes works best.

+1 a1Jim….Shellac works with any finish….you may be able to tint the shellac with the mixol…but not sure…I’ve only tinted shellac with TransTint

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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