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Forum topic by trippcasey posted 06-12-2013 08:54 PM 893 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trippcasey

72 posts in 1391 days


06-12-2013 08:54 PM

Ive read a few posts around where many are saying that they are finally getting back into their shops because its finally defrosting. Well, here its the opposite. With the heat index at 116 and 90% humidity, I think my behind is going to retire it until October….when its only 90 and 75% humidity. I went to do some cleaning in the shop today, opened the doors and put a fan out to create a draft, and within minutes I was soaked with sweat. After a little sweeping and vacuuming, my head was pounding like a marching band bass drum. Its blistering hot! Im gonna need to find me a couple window units, then cut some windows for the units in the walls if I plan to do anything this summer. I cant take the heat like I used to.

-- I almost post pics....until I see the daily top three...then I delete my post.


11 replies so far

View DeputyDawg's profile

DeputyDawg

193 posts in 3432 days


#1 posted 06-12-2013 10:43 PM

I can go along with the humidity but not the 116. It’s 109 humidity 8% here is Buckeye, AZ and yes it is hot. I did put about 4 hours in the shop today and the fan felt good and so did the water help. But now back in the house with the A/C on at 80 degrees. I was stationed at Brunswick, GA in the Navy and I can understand the high humidity but the BUGs were the worse problem. I check the weather in Waverly and it says 97 and humidity 47%. But I’m sure it feels like 116 and 90% humidity. Enjoy your summer
DeputyDawg

-- DeputyDawg

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

4092 posts in 1657 days


#2 posted 06-12-2013 10:59 PM

i know exactly what you mean its been 96 and heat index of 105,with high humidity.after working 12-14 hour days i don’t feel like much during the week,so maybe doing a little on saturday morning til it gets 90 out.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

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verdesardog

137 posts in 2078 days


#3 posted 06-12-2013 11:00 PM

Well it’s about 104 in my shop in the afternoon so I do any woodworking in the morning then go in the house for the reast of the day….

-- .. heyoka ..

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trippcasey

72 posts in 1391 days


#4 posted 06-12-2013 11:01 PM

Im not sure about the 47%. Maybe for those that live on the sand hill or something. Im in the swamp…literally. Ive been tracking the humidity with a sling psychrometer daily for a little experiment Ive been doing with air drying lumber down here, and since tropical storm Andrea came and went, we havent had anything less than 90%, with todays humidity being the lowest at 90%. I cook moisture from a control piece of lumber and track it with the humidity fluctuations to try and find the equilibrium for air dried lumber. I cook one once a week. Today, for air dried red oak cut 11/28/12, the moisture was 23%. I hope if I do this long enough I can learn something. Its only been going for about three months now.

-- I almost post pics....until I see the daily top three...then I delete my post.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7160 posts in 2381 days


#5 posted 06-13-2013 01:02 AM

I’m trying to finish my shellac job (Cobbler’s bench coffee table) here in south Texas but the +100F in the shop and high humidity makes it hard to spray because of evaporative rates of the alcohol in the shellac and the basic comfort factor for us humans. That said, my shop time is about to cease for the summer.

Once I get the finish done, I might be able to build some more in the mornings and head inside in the afternoons, but finishing is not in the cards.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#6 posted 06-13-2013 02:33 AM

The heat doesn’t really bother me if I’m out of the sun and have some fans going.

Mike, Padding or rubbing that shellac on works well for me when it’s hot and the fans are blowing so that spraying isn’t an option.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2592 days


#7 posted 06-13-2013 12:14 PM

I feel for ya…and one of the three main reasons I can not handle my current studio anymore. Been 6 years of every summer being a sweat shop…. am on the top floor of a old meat packing building without any trees or shade. Once that roof heats up.. it stays hot all summer and two of my past assistants have called it “the oven”. I had heat stroke as a kid and can not tolerate anything above 80… I miss many days of work due to heat. I am moving soon.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

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HorizontalMike

7160 posts in 2381 days


#8 posted 06-13-2013 04:12 PM

gfadvm,
I already have a several coat thick of ‘padded’ shellac on the piece and have sanded it down to minimize/eliminate most of the brush strokes. I want to be able to spray a final coat of shellac that I can cure and then polish to a gloss.

That said, I think I found out here on LJs, that using isopropyl alcohol to thin the shellac will low the speed at which it evaporates and allow a longer ‘open time’ for the finish to flow evenly. With the high humidity in the mornings and ~100F by noon or so, I think I will be trying this method on my project this weekend.

I don’t mind WW-ing/building in these temps so much, but trying to “finish” in these temps is tough.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View trippcasey's profile

trippcasey

72 posts in 1391 days


#9 posted 06-13-2013 10:43 PM

If you use an isopropyl alcohol, try to find a high % and low water content. Water will defeat your purpose and effect your finish. If you get a 90% or over isopropyl alcohol, it will work better than a lower %. It hurts like hell on an open wound too. Just ask my lead engineer. When he dropped a bearing block (25lbs of solid machined steel) on his finger and squashed it like a grape, the first thing he did was grab the alcohol and pour some on. The next thing he remembers was waking up in the hospital. He said a fire lit on his hand, and that was it. He ended up with more stitches in his head than his finger. Its funny now….4 years later.

-- I almost post pics....until I see the daily top three...then I delete my post.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#10 posted 06-14-2013 12:33 AM

Mike, You shouldn’t have any brush strokes with the padding/rubbing method. Check out Black Cherry’s blog on shellac. That’s the method I use and I love it. No sanding after the first couple of heavier “wash coats” !

The isopropyl would make me really nervous with the increased water content as water will really make a gummy mess of shellac in my hands.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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trippcasey

72 posts in 1391 days


#11 posted 06-14-2013 02:39 AM

Found this on another site:

Spraying shellac is no different than spraying other finishes. Just as thinning shellac reduces brush marks during brushing, thinning reduces orange peel while spraying.

However you apply the shellac, allow the first coat to dry about two hours, then sand with gray, 320-grit stearated (self-lubricated) sandpaper just enough to remove dust nibs and raised grain. Use a light touch to reduce sandpaper clogging and to avoid sanding through the finish.

Remove the dust and apply a second coat. Add more alcohol to the shellac if you’re getting severe brush marks or orange peel, or if air bubbles are drying in the film. The alcohol will slow the drying and allow the bubbles to pop out. There is no limit to the amount you can thin shellac, but you may have to apply more coats to get the build you want.

Apply as many coats as necessary to achieve the look you want. Each new coat dissolves into the existing coat, so there’s no need to sand between coats except to remove dust nibs or other flaws. To see flaws like runs and sags before they dry in the film, arrange your work so you can see a reflected light in the area you’re finishing. Then brush out the flaws before they dry.

If the humidity is high, or if there’s too much water in the alcohol you’ve used to thin your shellac, it may turn milky-white. This is called “blushing” and is caused by moisture settling in the finish. Wait for a drier day, use a purer alcohol or both. You usually can remove existing blushing in the finish by applying alcohol on a dry day or by rubbing with an abrasive, such as a Scotch-Brite pad or steel wool.

If, at any time, you create problems you can’t remove without creating greater problems, strip the finish with alcohol or paint stripper and begin again. In between coats you can store your brush by hanging it in a jar of alcohol, or you can clean it easily by washing it in a half-and-half mixture of household ammonia and water. You can reclaim brushes with hardened shellac by soaking in either solution.

When you have applied the desired number of coats (three is minimum in most cases), you can leave the finish as is. Or you can level it using 320-grit and finer sandpaper and a flat backing block, then rub it to the sheen you want using Scotch-Brite pads, fine steel wool or abrasive compounds like pumice and rottenstone. If the rubbed finish shows finger marks easily, apply paste wax or an oily furniture polish. PW

Let me know if you want the link. Ill inbox you.

-- I almost post pics....until I see the daily top three...then I delete my post.

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