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Ridgid rs4511 run on 220?

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Forum topic by Burgels posted 06-12-2013 02:55 AM 625 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Burgels

116 posts in 498 days


06-12-2013 02:55 AM

I heard that my ridgid tablesaw could be converted to 220v for more power on the stock motor. Is this true? Is it worth it? Has anyone done it? I have the version with the granite top if that makes any difference as to the motor that’s in it.


20 replies so far

View Mark's profile

Mark

454 posts in 662 days


#1 posted 06-12-2013 03:04 AM

I would think there is a schematic on the motor to change the voltage. 240V vs 120 is a no brainer. Lot less effort on the motor, more efficient (cheaper to run). Don’t expect an increase in hp ‘cause that ain’t gonna happen, but ya, do it if you can.

-- Mark

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REO

626 posts in 761 days


#2 posted 06-12-2013 03:46 AM

It makes no difference in power or efficiency to run on one voltage VS another. start up may be slightly snappier with the correct cap sizing but running its a horse a piece. This subject comes up fairly often. There are those who swear it makes a difference and those who understand that it wont. Those who think it will make a difference run their cars on water and are off the grid self sufficient with an over unity generator in the basement so I cant understand why they would care. LOL

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josephf

52 posts in 784 days


#3 posted 06-12-2013 04:39 AM

I keep hearing that it makes no difference in power yet my own experience has been different . My old delta cabinet saw bogged as a 110v and this changed with 220 hook-up . dust collector sounds better . I tend to run all my big motors 220 ,they usually run smoother . maybe it is types of motors . My advice switch it to 220 and see if it helps .

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knotscott

5514 posts in 2063 days


#4 posted 06-12-2013 10:19 AM

Every circuit is unique, so results vary. You won’t get more power, but if your current 110v line is a tad weak (many are overloaded, have very long runs, many junctions, etc), switching to 220v tends to have less voltage loss, and therefore faster starts and better recovery due to better amp flow (which can make it feel more powerful). If 220v is readily available, it’s an easy and cheap switch that could offer some improvements. If 220v is not available, it’s probably not worth installing just to see if it works better for you. At the very least, see if you can dedicate the entire 110v circuit to your TS. If you’re going to run a new circuit anyway, I’d definitely add 220v.

FWIW, my Cman 22124 (sibling to your R4511) did better on a 220v, but as stated my 110v circuit was obviously limiting amp flow.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Burgels's profile

Burgels

116 posts in 498 days


#5 posted 06-12-2013 12:49 PM

Thanks guys. My shop has it’s own dedicated panel and I don’t think the 110 is overloaded in my case. I don’t have a 220 circuit right now so it sounds like it wouldn’t be worth the effort/money to install one.

Thanks for the info

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1930 posts in 556 days


#6 posted 06-12-2013 12:55 PM

Thanks indeed. Lots of useful information in this thread. Things I had not previously considered.

In the field, I can attest that using a heavier gauge cord, and as short a cord possible, will in fact increase power and decrease strain on a given motor. My guys seemingly refuse to acknowledge this as evidenced by their reluctance to roll out the heavier cords when needed.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

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TopamaxSurvivor

14863 posts in 2363 days


#7 posted 06-12-2013 07:42 PM

knotscott hit the nail on the head! ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Charlie's profile (online now)

Charlie

1048 posts in 974 days


#8 posted 06-12-2013 07:53 PM

Trying to wrap my head around the amp draw part of this. If you have a 60amp panel in the shop and you run stuff on 220 where you can, does it draw less amps giving you room to run more stuff? Or does it just draw the same amount of amps, just split between the 2 110 legs of the 220 line?

If the amp draw is lower, that would be an advantage I think.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2336 days


#9 posted 06-12-2013 07:56 PM

more efficient – yes as in terms of better recovery/startup times – so the saw will feel like it is responding better.

but horsepower stays the same – so you will not be gaining any more power.

that said, the motor will be happier on a 220v -so if possible, it is a good thing to do for it long term, but nothing that will miraculously bring you new cutting powers to the shop by any means :)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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knotscott

5514 posts in 2063 days


#10 posted 06-12-2013 08:20 PM

”...Or does it just draw the same amount of amps, just split between the 2 110 legs of the 220 line?...”

Charlie – I’m in way over my head here, so if I’m wrong I hope someone who understands it better (like Topamax) will chime in. I think you got it…the total amperage is split between two legs with 220v, which allows each leg to handle peak current demand better than a single leg carrying twice the load, which reduces voltage loss during those peak demands and the excess heat heat associated with it, which makes the motor last longer, and makes it feel like it’s got more power, etc, etc.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14863 posts in 2363 days


#11 posted 06-12-2013 08:21 PM

Charlie, twice the voltage = 1/2 the amps; conversely, 1/2 the voltage = twice the amps

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Charlie

1048 posts in 974 days


#12 posted 06-12-2013 08:31 PM

OK, forgive me, I’m still not clear.
If a saw draws 20 amps on 110V, my assumption has always been that it draws 10amps TOTAL (5amps each leg) if you run it on 220.

Why? Because in the end you’re using wattage. And paying for Kilowatt hours.
Volts x Amps = watts
So on 110 it uses 2200 watts

If that same saw on 220 used the same 20 amps, just split between the 2 legs, it would be using 4400 watts and would cost twice as much to run (because you’re paying for kilowatt hours)

If that same saw on 220 used 5 amps per leg (for a total of 10 amps or HALF the amperage of when it was on 110) then it would use the same 2200 watts as before. So it’s not more or less expensive to operate, but now my 60 amp panel still has 50 amps available instead of 40.

I used to deal with this stuff as a millwright in a plant, but maybe I found another memory hole from my accident. :) Any electricians that can shed some light on this?

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2336 days


#13 posted 06-12-2013 08:43 PM

the saw uses the same wattage whether run on 110, or 220 – that is how the HP is determined, and a 1.5HP motor is a 1.5HP motor independent of what voltage is used to drive it.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5514 posts in 2063 days


#14 posted 06-12-2013 09:16 PM

The power consumed is the same regardless (measured and billed in kilowatt hours). The motor coils either run in parallel or in series depending on the voltage configuration. Either way, each coil sees the same amperage…that amperage is either supplied by one hot lead with twice the amperage, or by two hot leads with half the amperage. (I think!?)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14863 posts in 2363 days


#15 posted 06-12-2013 10:07 PM

No power in the neutral Charlie, so disregard it. Power in the hots only. 2 hots = 240 v at 5 amps. Same power with one hot = 120 v at 10 amps.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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