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Advice before painting changing table? light distressing/antiquing

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Forum topic by Eddie posted 06-11-2013 05:25 PM 1528 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eddie

212 posts in 671 days


06-11-2013 05:25 PM

Hi guys,

I am nearly done with the changing table/dresser I am building for our baby boy (due in less that 5 weeks!) Here is a picture

Per my wife’s request, I will be painting it antique white and then plan on roughing it up a little to add to the rustic farmhouse style. It was built knowing that she wanted it painted, hence the mismatched wood used. The nursery is designed around a rustic theme (see wall shelf unit here – http://lumberjocks.com/projects/85028 ).
I will also be adding a hanging wall clock made from weathered pallet wood.

I am planning to paint, then use sandpaper to scuff the corners, creases and edges a bit. I may add a little stain to the uncovered wood to help it contrast more.
I wanted to ask if anyone has done something similar and had advice/cautionary tales.

Does this sound like the right way to get the look?
If you have other techniques please let me know.

Thanks in advance.


9 replies so far

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

15408 posts in 1288 days


#1 posted 06-11-2013 05:30 PM

My wife likes the same style. When I made the plate rack she had me paint a coat of gold under the top coat so its not bare fresh wood showing. Just another approach I guess.

The changing table looks great.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Brandon

4145 posts in 1672 days


#2 posted 06-11-2013 05:52 PM

I’ve done a couple of things like this, but usually with a darker color, rather than with white paint. It worked for me to just paint it directly, then sand off the corners and distressed areas, but with white paint, I’d try it first on a scrap piece to make sure you’re getting the look you want. Also, you might want to look into using milk paint and even adding a crackling texture to it.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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crank49

3481 posts in 1691 days


#3 posted 06-11-2013 06:23 PM

Paint first with a darker shade of your finish coat and let dry. Then rub areas where you will want the top coat to look “worn” with a block of paraffin before painting with the top coat. After the top coat is dry you can rub it off of the “worn” areas with fine steel wool or a Scotch Brite Pad, letting the darker under coat show.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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Eddie

212 posts in 671 days


#4 posted 06-11-2013 06:27 PM

Brandon-
She specifically mentioned she would prefer to not have the crackling texture, so I am nervous to use milk paint. I may experiement with it later, when I dont have as much of a timeline.

Crank-
That sounds like a great idea, I would prefer not to purchase two colors of paint though…maybe I can tint some of the white I purchase…

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Brandon

4145 posts in 1672 days


#5 posted 06-11-2013 06:37 PM

Eddie, regular milk paint won’t crackle unless you use a certain additive, as far as I understand it. That said, latex is so much cheaper than milk paint that I usually go that route.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Don W

15408 posts in 1288 days


#6 posted 06-11-2013 07:27 PM

My wife doesn’t like the cracked look either, but she usually wants milk paint. Its got an old time flat look. I agree with Brandon, if you’re going to try to scuff up white paint, test it, the white on bare wood may be hard to distinguish.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Eddie

212 posts in 671 days


#7 posted 06-11-2013 07:34 PM

Okay, I may look into the milk paint option, thanks!

I think I have seen a few use a gray or yellowish stain on a very small paint brush (i think miniwax even has stain pens) to apply it to the bare wood and help with the contrast.
Does that sound like it would work?

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

15408 posts in 1288 days


#8 posted 06-11-2013 07:45 PM

the problem with spot painting you need to remember where you painted it. Paint a coat of solid color (or stain may work, I’ve never tried it) then paint over it with a final coat. Then hit the edges (and other spots if desired) with some medium grit sand paper, being careful to not go through the base coat.

the idea is to make it look worn, so you want to hit spots that would wear naturally, like edges, around knobs or pulls, were feet will scuff, etc.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Devin's profile

Devin

10 posts in 276 days


#9 posted 02-21-2014 12:39 AM

Do you happen to have any plans for this project? dimensions and such… I know this is an really old post, but this table is really nice looking!

-- A hobby turned passion...

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