LumberJocks

Template routing for curves

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Millo posted 06-11-2013 03:51 PM 2040 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Millo's profile

Millo

543 posts in 2513 days


06-11-2013 03:51 PM

I am planning to add slightly-curved parts for a project.

I’m sure many here use this method or variations thereof.

Essentially, I got 1/2” MDF which I plan to trace the curves on—these curves are concave, by the way. Cut and fair template material, add blocking to limit movement when attaching to workpiece, attach this to workpiece using double-stick tape. Trace curve onto workpiece, close but outside of the line on the bandsaw, attach template again, route flush to template.

My main concern is the fairing of the concave curve on the MDF template—how do you do it? There’s the question of the fairing the curve, and then there’s the question of keeping that faired edge square to the MDF template’s faces.

I was thinking of using a bendy strip, attaching sandpaper to it and fairing all curves this way.

What’s your faovrite methods? How do you ensure that sqaureness? Pros and cons?

Thanks!


4 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8302 posts in 3111 days


#1 posted 06-11-2013 04:46 PM

I make a 1/4” template out of hardboard (or 1/4” ply but
I like hardboard better as it works more consistently).

If I want a thicker template, I make the thin one
first and make the thicker one from it.

I fair curves using rasps and files – using a “draw filing”
technique. I find it much easier to keep the edge
of the template square in 1/4”.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4854 posts in 2276 days


#2 posted 06-11-2013 04:55 PM

I like 3/4” mdf for templates. That way I can attach a pair of toggle clamps to hold the workpiece in place.
If I am only making a couple parts I use the carpet tape, however if I have many parts to shape I use the toggle clamps mounted to the jig.
As far as shaping the template, just cut it close to the line and sand it fair. I use an oscillating belt sander, but a sanding block would work fine.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Millo's profile

Millo

543 posts in 2513 days


#3 posted 06-11-2013 09:01 PM

That’s nice pinto, that’s what I had in mind but was talked out of simply because there are going to be a few of these curved pieces and my shop tim is very limited, at the local community college. This piece is also going to be a one-off. Thanks!

Loren, I haven’t finished a single one yet but bought a full 1/2” thick MDF sheet and started marking the largest templates. Dang, I should’ve thought it’d be easier to keep square at 1/4”. I’ll consult tomorrow with the expert. Thanks!

View Millo's profile

Millo

543 posts in 2513 days


#4 posted 06-29-2013 02:09 PM

ANOTHER QUESTION:

Do you use both a flush trim bit AND a pattern bit to deal with changes on grain direction?

Pinto, have you had that problem? all my curves at the moment are going to be concave, like the one on your rail in the picture. My pieces are cherry. Have you had much troouble with grain direction reversal and tear out?

I JUST REALIZED THAT YOU CAN FILP THE PIECE ON YOUR JIG IF THE CURVE BEING CUT IS A SYMMETRICAL ONE. This is the case on all my curved parts on this project EXCEPT ON THE LEGS.

Thanks!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com