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Assembling a Cyclone

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Forum topic by DavidNJ posted 06-09-2013 10:58 PM 517 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavidNJ

384 posts in 651 days


06-09-2013 10:58 PM

I have the Penn State Cyclone…half in boxes, half out. It looks quite rugged. The motor/blower weighs a ton! (Actually 85lbs according to the box). The instructions call for the cyclone (maybe 50lbs) to be assembled inverted on top of the motor/blower, the the whole assembly inverted and lifted into place. That complete assembly would appear to be both heavy and awkward to handle.

Has anyone here tackled this before? If so, how did you do it? Did you build a jig?

I’m thinking of building a jig that connects the mounts to a piece of plywood, the plywood by 2×6s or 2×8s to a pivot at the right height. Then after it is assembled just rotate it on the jig. The jig could end up just being a stand. One advantage would be disassembly if needed for a repair.

This is what the unit looks like:


7 replies so far

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FirehouseWoodworking

624 posts in 1931 days


#1 posted 06-10-2013 02:21 AM

David,

IMHO, if you put the cyclone on any sort of moving/rotating jig, you stand to induce a lot of unnecessary vibration and additional noise. The cyclone needs to be mounted very solid.

Rather, get a few buddies to help you raise it into place. Good luck!

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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DavidNJ

384 posts in 651 days


#2 posted 06-10-2013 03:50 AM

Once in final position all the parts would be rigid. The jig would allow it to be assembled so that a simple rotation placed it at the correct height and orientation. The unit is only supported by two metal L-brackets 20” apart with no triangulation for support and two smaller L-brackets 7 1/2” apart for stability. No one has reported a problem with the brackets and or any problems with the units. That seems pretty common for the better dust collectors.

I’m beginning to think I’ll mount the whole thing on wheels with a 3/4” plywood base about 1/2”-3/4” above the floor. The 12” between the bin and cyclone can be shortened for clearance. That isn’t to make it a moveable item, but to allow it to be easily moved into position and maybe change the position as I continue to clear out areas in the basement. It is pretty crowded down there now with three 4 big pieces of equipment (table saw, band saw, planer, drill press) in addition to what was there already (storage, bicycles, gym, golf club assembly area, computer assembly area).

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FirehouseWoodworking

624 posts in 1931 days


#3 posted 06-10-2013 04:35 AM

David,

Sounds reasonable. If you’re going that route, why not build the frame/jig and then lay it down on the floor. Assemble the cyclone on the floor and attach it to the frame/jig on the while it is still on the floor. Then push it over to generally where you want it and just stand the whole thing up? The frame/jig will act somewhat as a lever and assist you in lifting the awkwardly shaped cyclone into final position.

If you want to move it later, just lower the whole thing back to the ground and repeat the process.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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DavidNJ

384 posts in 651 days


#4 posted 06-10-2013 04:47 AM

The cyclone isn’t stable on its side. Inverted the weight of the motor relative to the cyclone lets it work ok.

I’m still working on the design. I’m guessing that after rotating to position the plywood the brackets are bolted to will in turn be bolted to a frame made with 2×4s. I’m thinking of using 1/4” plywood on the sides to give the structure rigidity rather than rely on frame alone.

It will probably take me more time sourcing the pieces and building the frame than some people spend assembling the cyclone. However, it will let me do it without finding help. In my 20s, there were lots of friends to help move, lift, etc. Now, they are all on the golf course. :(

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1794 posts in 1151 days


#5 posted 06-10-2013 11:47 AM

My Oneida was much the same. I assembled it upright, but I had an engine hoist to lift the motor/blower onto the top of the body. The first time I mounted it to the wall brackets, I used the engine hoist for that….it wasn’t that easy, I needed clearance above the cyclone for the boom/chains I was using to lift it and only had an inch to spare (9’ceilings). Besides, when lifted with the hoist the cyclone tipped slightly making sitting it on the wall bracket a struggle. So over time I had to take it down for a change, and then bought a platform lift ($160, HF). I used it to lift the thing up and roll it on to the bracket….much, much better. You can rent these things as well, if you’re doing it by your self I highly recommend it.” Here’s a pic of how that looked”: [IMG]http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii280/Fredhargis/Lift.jpg[/IMG][/URL].

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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kizerpea

746 posts in 1025 days


#6 posted 06-10-2013 12:01 PM

Make sure u leave extra space for a taller catch can, so if want to change it later..

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1743 days


#7 posted 06-10-2013 02:28 PM

I second Fred, a friend has an old Delta cyclone mounted the same way when the bearings went out. He
used his platform lift to lower and raise it with a minimum of trouble.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

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