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cutting board book?

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Forum topic by mart posted 10-21-2008 05:08 AM 4092 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mart

190 posts in 3437 days


10-21-2008 05:08 AM

I have been seeing all these great cutting boards in the projects and was wondering if anyone knows of a good book that details the construction of these interesting cutting boards? I have boxes of scraps that I would love to use up making cutting boards for family and friends. I did a search on Amazon and didn’t find anything. Thanks.

Mart


23 replies so far

View lazyfiremaninTN's profile

lazyfiremaninTN

528 posts in 3765 days


#1 posted 10-21-2008 05:14 AM

As silly as this sounds, I just start ripping wood into strips or dig thru the scrap bin and let the wood tell me how it wants to go together, and then I get approval from she who must be obeyed.

There is no real science to it, just go with the flow.

-- Adrian ..... The 11th Commandment...."Thou Shalt Not Buy A Wobble Dado"

View jerryw's profile

jerryw

158 posts in 3728 days


#2 posted 10-21-2008 05:27 AM

there are some very good ideas for cutting boards here on LJ. i design some of my boards on graph paper and some are made by just gluing up whatever is leftover. scrap in my shop is sawdust and planner shavings.

-- jerryw-wva.

View DonJ's profile

DonJ

250 posts in 3339 days


#3 posted 10-23-2008 11:33 PM

Mart,

I have been visiting several wood forums over the past couple of years. When I see something I like, I cut and paste various articles and pictures of fellow woodworkers projects. I’ve got a folder with about 6 different Word docs that I’ve collected. Some have the proceedures people used, where some are just pictures of their final products. If you would like me to email you what I’ve saved, give me your address. In addition, “The Wood Whisperer” has a video of how he makes his end grain cutting boards.

Don

-- Don, San Antonio, TX

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 3704 days


#4 posted 10-24-2008 02:00 AM

I do the same thing as DonJ. I have a folder full of pictures I capture when I run across a board using a nice combination of woods or patterns that I like. When I get an idea for a unique pattern I use graph paper and fill in the squares until I get the look I want before cutting the strips. I’ve also come up with some interesting patterns by accident when I got the strips out of the correct order as the plan.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3370 days


#5 posted 10-24-2008 02:08 AM

Dido all the remarks above. I’ll guarantee you that if you use the scraps in your shop for cutting boards, you’ll never make two of the same. They will all come out different. I even mad my wife a dining table from scraps and it turned out great. She has to show it to everyone who comes to the house. I will post a picture of it on my projects tomorrow.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

View mart's profile

mart

190 posts in 3437 days


#6 posted 10-24-2008 09:09 AM

Thanks guys. I have seen the Wood Whisperer video since I posted this and that opened my eyes. I have found a couple of plans and looked at most of the posts here on cutting boards. Lots of great info. I should be able to turn out a few with the ever increasing pile of scraps I have.

Mart

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1164 posts in 3795 days


#7 posted 10-24-2008 03:23 PM

lazyfiremaninTN, that is just to funny to let it go by “I get approval from she who must be obeyed.”

Mine “Task Master” keeps a todo list on a shared network drive just in case I forget what is next on the masters list of todo’s

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1426 posts in 3308 days


#8 posted 11-04-2008 02:32 AM

I, like Mark, would like to use some of my “exoti wood scraps” for some cutting boards but need to seek some information or advise….......... I want to design a cutting board using either “side grain” or “face grain” up, but most of what I see referred to on this site is “end grain”. Is there a problem in trying to do what i want to? What are the pros and cons of either way.

Any advise / suggestions welcomed and needed….......... tks

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3763 days


#9 posted 11-04-2008 03:12 AM

majeagle1, it really depends on what you will be using the board for. End grain cutting boards tend to hold up better to chopping and high volume cutting. That is why you see traditional butcher blocks are end grain. The best way to explain this is as follows:

End grain is just like you holding a bundle of toothpicks or small dowel (the wood fibers). When the knife blade contacts the surface it spreads the fibers. After the knife leaves the surface the fibers spring back into their normal positions.

When you make a board using edge grain you are actually cutting across the fibers. The fibers cannot mend themselves, so over time the board surface will break down.

A majority of the boards I sell are edge or face grains. Bread boards, cheese boards, or just plain serving boards. You must be very careful because these types of boards tend to warp if you don’t mill them properly. People who enjoy cooking tend to purchase a traditional end grain board.

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

382 posts in 3322 days


#10 posted 11-05-2008 04:05 PM

Tearen, I’m going to pick up on your comment about properly milling wood for an edge grain board to prevent warping. I am about to rip into some wood for my first cutting boards…what considerations should be given to prevent warping?

Thanks!

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3763 days


#11 posted 11-05-2008 06:01 PM

ghazard, treat your cutting board just like a small table top. You should allow the stock that you have ripped to size normalize to the shop conditions. You may find that the stresses released by cutting the board will change the shape of the cut pieces. If you have a jointer you can now resurface your pieces flat.

As for the glue-up, alternate your grain direction. This allows the board to naturally balance during normal shifts due to moisture, temp, etc. If you are forced to use boards with a bow (which a lot of us small time hobbists do), be very careful trying to press the board flat. This will put added stresses into the cutting board. If you have a planer or surface planer and extra thickness you can allow the bow(s) in the glue-up and remove the required material to flatten the part. Lots of extra work, but sometimes an necessary evil when you have some interesting woods.

Last but not least, you can use breadboard ends to help control warp.

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

382 posts in 3322 days


#12 posted 11-05-2008 08:53 PM

Thanks, Tearen! Instead of starting a new thread…I’ll tack a few more novice cuttingboard making questions on here. Mart, I hope you don’t mind.

1. If unused (ie, left out for show), how long will it take for a 100% mineral oil finished board to dry out and need reoiling? 1 month? 1 year? 5years?

2) Do you treat both sides of the board with whatever finish you choose?

Thanks!

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3763 days


#13 posted 11-05-2008 11:39 PM

ghazard,

1) This is what I tell my customers. It is not a perfect rule, but I have never had a board dry out when using these directions. Each wood act differently and may retain the oil for longer or a shorter time. : – once a week for the 1st month – Once a Month for the 1st year – Any time the surface looks ‘dry’ – You can buy mineral oil at almost any Riteaid or walgreen’s for a low cost option. If your board is going to see little use, then maybe you should look into a Beeswax/minerial oil finish or a salad bowl finish. Be careful with other type of oil because they may contain nut products. Remember, some people who may get/use your board could have a nut allergy and this can cause issues with their health.

2) You should always treat both sides of a project. Remember, you are changing the characteristics of the wood surface with oil. If you do not do both side, you may cause warp… Also, the oil helps protect the wood. An unprotected surface may discolor, mold, or something else. Once again, treat the board like you would any wood table top.

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

382 posts in 3322 days


#14 posted 11-06-2008 03:57 PM

...That answers it, Thanks. I ripped my boards last night, but they are still in long strips as I ran out of time. Some of them warped significantly after being cut, in both axises (...when set on the bench edge grain up, some bowed front to back in a concave shape and some the centers of the strip raised off the bench.) If I added this pic right, you can see the warping, it is apparent in the walnut and cherry and you can see that one of the center maple boards is raised up from the rest. I suspect this increases the tendency of a finished cutting board to warp…but how much? Am I screwed with this material or is this an “acceptable” amount of warping that the glue will hold it OK?

Thanks for taking the time to answer all my questions….

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View mart's profile

mart

190 posts in 3437 days


#15 posted 11-06-2008 08:41 PM

ghazard,

By all means jump in any time on one of my posts. We are here to share information and become better at woodworking and find more enjoyment in it through our associations here.

Mart

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