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Prevent raised grain of wood utensils?

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Forum topic by flwoodie posted 06-05-2013 06:09 PM 758 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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flwoodie

26 posts in 489 days


06-05-2013 06:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: utensil spoon spatula muddler raised grain food safe finish sanding finishing turning arts and crafts rustic traditional

I am looking to sell and give away some wooden utensils in the near future. But, I have some I bought at a craft fair that are getting “fuzzy” with raised grain. It’s not really a problem for me, but is there a process anybody knows of to cure this before it leaves my shop? It would make it easier on friends and customers. I plan to use mineral oil/beeswax as a finish, but also considering “Salad Bowl Finish.”


10 replies so far

View jap's profile

jap

1229 posts in 712 days


#1 posted 06-05-2013 06:16 PM

One idea is to wet the utensil once it is fully sanded, then lightly sand off the raised grain.

-- Joel

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crank49

3434 posts in 1629 days


#2 posted 06-05-2013 08:22 PM

Put a few coats of Min Wax Polycyclic on there and the problem goes away.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

537 posts in 693 days


#3 posted 06-05-2013 08:25 PM

When I make wok stirrers, I have taken to wetting them down when I’m all done, then fine sanding. I will then apply mineral oil. There may be better oils to apply, but mineral oil is inexpensive and it works.

Shouldn’t really have a problem with it after that.

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flwoodie

26 posts in 489 days


#4 posted 06-05-2013 09:47 PM

That was along the same lines as I was thinking, wetting them then a final sanding.

One question on the polycyclic, there seems to be a lot of debate about different finishes being food safe or not. A hard finish seems like an ideal solution, to reduce aftercare. But so few call themselves food safe. But then I read recently that just about all finishes are food safe once fully cured. Any opinions on this?

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crank49

3434 posts in 1629 days


#5 posted 06-05-2013 10:48 PM

I been ignoring the “hazards” of non-food-safe-rated finishes for about 60 years. Not dead yet.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

235 posts in 1075 days


#6 posted 06-06-2013 12:18 AM

I think wood selection has a lot to do with the fuzziness developing on some wooden cooking utensils. My kitchen experience has led me to only use olive wood.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

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flwoodie

26 posts in 489 days


#7 posted 06-06-2013 01:17 AM

Well, the only problem with that is that not all people like the look of olive wood, and it is just human nature to want a selection

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MNgary

235 posts in 1075 days


#8 posted 06-06-2013 01:30 AM

Very true, flwoodie. But sometimes you can’t have a cake leftover after it’s been eaten.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1854 posts in 2219 days


#9 posted 06-06-2013 01:54 AM

A film coating will wear off non-uniformly, so in my opinion mineral oil is better if the utensil will actually be used for cooking.

-- Joe

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

733 posts in 1553 days


#10 posted 06-06-2013 09:38 PM

I usually wet it several times and lightly sand the raised grain each time until it is very smooth and then finish with mineral oil. Hand wash and dry only. You can occasionally rub in a bit of mineral oil after use, but I never have felt the need to.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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