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Sinker Heart Pine and Some Hardwoods

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Forum topic by richardwootton posted 06-03-2013 04:18 PM 1095 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardwootton

1417 posts in 680 days


06-03-2013 04:18 PM

There’s a guy near me listing sinker heart pine from the 1800s and he also has some sinkers that he believes to be either hickory and/or walnut. He’s willing to mill it for 1.50 a board foot. What I’m trying to fugue out is if there are some things that I need to look out for before buying. Anyone have experience with sinker hardwoods like hickory or walnut?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training


12 replies so far

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WDHLT15

1189 posts in 1201 days


#1 posted 06-03-2013 08:38 PM

Never heard of sinker walnut and hickory. Where are you located?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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mja979

255 posts in 758 days


#2 posted 06-03-2013 08:39 PM

Would “sinker” refer to salvaged wood from the bottom of a lake or river?

-- https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/787761497/the-hybrid-3d-lunatic-and-other-maze-puzzles

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richardwootton

1417 posts in 680 days


#3 posted 06-04-2013 09:00 PM

WD I’m in Central Arkansas, Hot Springs to be exact and the guy who has these logs is in Malvern which is about 20 minutes away. I’d never heard of sinker Walnut or Hickory before either that’s why I was curious about it, as well as curious as to how well it would hold up over time submerged under water.

mja979 – Yes, sinker does refer to salvaged wood from the bottom of a river in this case.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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mja979

255 posts in 758 days


#4 posted 06-04-2013 09:02 PM

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CrazeeTxn

150 posts in 675 days


#5 posted 06-04-2013 10:26 PM

Watching TV does payoff sometimes :) I watch ax men on occassion and there’s “swamp man” and some other fellas in FL that go for the “sinker” logs. The used to float them to the mills on the river or lake and sometimes they would either bust apart or a storm would throw them everywhere and eventually they sink to the bottom. They say the cold water and lack of light perserve the wood.

They usually get a premium for the logs they find so $1.50 sounds really good. Wish I was closer.

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mja979

255 posts in 758 days


#6 posted 06-04-2013 11:00 PM

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richardwootton

1417 posts in 680 days


#7 posted 06-04-2013 11:33 PM

CrazeeTxn, I have seen that also. I think what they are primarily dealing with are sinker Cypress trees, which I know have a good rot resistance. I sure am curious to see how these hardwoods have held up. I know there is a big market for sinker mahogany. It would certainly be great if the fact that they have been under water for 80+ years has created some interesting attributes to the wood itself.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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Monte Pittman

15184 posts in 1063 days


#8 posted 06-04-2013 11:35 PM

If I were there, I would probably take a chance on it. Wouldn’t want to pass on possible really cool wood.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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richardwootton

1417 posts in 680 days


#9 posted 06-04-2013 11:43 PM

Monte, I am definitely planning on picking some up. He actually has to wait to for river levels to go down some in order to pull out some of the hardwood logs. I’m really excited to see what kind of stuff he finds in there. I have always been curious what species of log was underneath me when paddling my kayak on the Arkansas rivers.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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hotbyte

192 posts in 1700 days


#10 posted 06-04-2013 11:51 PM

Pulling up sinker logs was on This Old House or some other type show many years ago. Very cool to be rescuing those resources lost so long ago. I think they said lack of air/oxygen has a lot to do with wood not rotting.

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WDHLT15

1189 posts in 1201 days


#11 posted 06-05-2013 02:41 AM

Wonder why he is selling it so cheap? You can’t buy regular walnut around here for anywhere near $1.50/BF.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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richardwootton

1417 posts in 680 days


#12 posted 06-05-2013 04:04 AM

WD, I actually bought a bunch of green Walnut at $1.50 a bd/ft regardless of thickness or width, I now have a carport overtaken with air drying walnut. My assumpitions as to why this guy is selling for so cheap are: 1) It’s free, the river he’s pulling these logs from runs directly by the town he lives in and possibly even his property. 2) he explicitly told me that he was trying to get his boat fixed and willing to make a deal. 3) He has no idea what he has. There was a very old sawmill that operated on this same river, and very near this particular town a very long time ago. And he is probably totally unaware of the price that old growth heart pine / long leaf pine currently fetches, and it’s particular rarity.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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