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Forum topic by ArtRafael posted 05-28-2013 11:32 PM 1173 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


05-28-2013 11:32 PM

I am starting a new thread to document a build process of a new model – new to me. I don’t have a real full scale tool but found some pictures and will work from that. Below is a pic of the goal. It is a little complex, but it caught my eye, and I’ve got to have one. Ralph


31 replies so far

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Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#1 posted 05-29-2013 01:08 AM

I’ll be watching…....

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#2 posted 05-29-2013 03:03 AM

Thanks Don. With every project I start by visualizing the component parts from every angle in three dimensions and how the components come together to form the complete item. That also helps me plan the sequence and order. I have to see the component parts and their relationship to each other in three dimensional space. Then I can just get down to fabrication. Ralph

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lwllms

548 posts in 2025 days


#3 posted 05-29-2013 03:15 AM

If you want to machine one, I have the cast parts from Paul Hamler. I think we have ten of them but you’ll need a milling machine to get one done.

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#4 posted 05-29-2013 01:38 PM

I would Love to have anything by Paul Hamler. Please tell me more. Ralph

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#5 posted 05-29-2013 04:13 PM

Got a good start today.

Glued paper pattern to brass stock 1/2” X 3/16”

Painstakenly cut out major components carefully (staying right on the line) to ensure proper fit along the way.

This is a very tedious job requiring patience and stamina. I do it in stages with frequent breaks when my hands cramp up and can’t grip.

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#6 posted 05-29-2013 04:16 PM

After a break— cut out other components.

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#7 posted 05-29-2013 04:20 PM

And performed other tasks – one step at a time.

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#8 posted 05-29-2013 05:23 PM

Tapping holes and cutting threads are basic operations in every build. Here it is important to follow drilling and tapping scales / schedules; the tiny taps employed can easily break and are difficult to correct. Sometimes a part has to be made anew and the procedure repeated. I just hate it when a tap breaks off and ruins a part – especially when the part was a long time in the making.

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Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#9 posted 05-29-2013 05:38 PM

I know all about the breaking taps.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#10 posted 05-29-2013 05:55 PM

Hi Don. I just checked out your gallery and am still trying to pick myself off the floor. I am blown away. You have done some incredible things – and so many. I must go back and view your gallery again. Ralph

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Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#11 posted 05-29-2013 05:57 PM

:-)

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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a1Jim

112806 posts in 2321 days


#12 posted 05-29-2013 06:49 PM

Thanks Art a very interesting process .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#13 posted 05-29-2013 10:40 PM

Major pieces cut out, deburred and thoroughly cleaned – especially in areas that need to accept solder.

Next it’s off to the foundry shop where the real magic happens. Ralph

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#14 posted 05-29-2013 11:39 PM

And here we are, parts laid out in proximity as they belong with soldering flux coating the areas that are to be silver soldered (this is really more like brazing than lead soldering). Often the pieces are pinned or tied (with thin wire) on a ceramic board. This is a very trickey procedure but it is magical because when done right the pieces aren’t just “glued” together; they really do become one piece as the parts melt into each other without distortion if the temperature applied is carefully regulated. I have used a butane torch to unite smaller pieces and sometimes need to use an oxy acetylene torch. Sounds simple? Well, maybe it is untill a third piece is to be united with the previously joined parts in a multiple piece part. Keeping in mind that brass melts at 1650 to 1720 degrees Fahrenheit when a particular part requires the joining of several pieces that cannot be laid out for a “one shot” soldering, the first union is soldered with a “hard” solder which melts at 1365 degrees; the next union is soldered with “medium” solder which melts at 1275 degrees, and the third union is soldered with “EZ” solder which melts at 1240. Therefore it is important to observe and carefully regulate the soldering temperature in each case so that the second soldering heat does not remelt the first soldered joint and the third heat does not melt the previous two joints causing everything to fall apart or shift rather than adhere in place (I hate it when that happens). This got wordy because it can be a complicated process and much care must be taken. Ralph

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ArtRafael

120 posts in 609 days


#15 posted 05-29-2013 11:47 PM

Now back to the finish shop. The pieces/parts have been joined and the result is one strong piece, but a scaley mess that needs to be thorougly cleaned up. First I soaked the piece in pickle (an acidic solution) to clean off some of the scale. The remaining char and scale is filed off smoothly in great detail and then sanded with progressively finer grit till a desired surface is achieved. Then it is off to the buffing wheel for buff and polish. These procedures will determine final appearance of the item. If it is carefully and finely done, the product will turn out smooth and shiney like jewelry.

Sometimes other procedures such as drilling or tapping are conducted at this stage.

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