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Is this a safe practice for dados?

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Forum topic by Bob #2 posted 10-16-2008 06:44 PM 2110 views 1 time favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bob #2

3810 posts in 4170 days


10-16-2008 06:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource tip safety

I was watching a video today and the craftsman was cutting a dado using the tablesaw fence as a guide for his
cut.

From misc pics

It sure looks like a kickback situation.
I have never, ever done this and always used a miter guide or router in a guide.
With so many newbies entering woodworking I though it appropriate to caution anyone trying to duplicate this method.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner


35 replies so far

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mot

4917 posts in 4185 days


#1 posted 10-16-2008 06:47 PM

It looks like a really bad idea. Not only will there be a kickback if his left hand pushes a smidge harder than his right, but when the kickback happens, the blade is going to eat his right hand. I just had a patient that did the very same thing in a cabinet maker apprentice program. Very ugly injury.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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SCOTSMAN

5849 posts in 3734 days


#2 posted 10-16-2008 06:58 PM

He shouldn’t do this or show it being done.He should use a mitre gauge ion the slot with a fence very poor standards to show especially newcomers.I have a book in my house where a famous American woodworker is seen putting little 2 ” pieces of wood through the bench saw using his hands and nothing else , so it just shows you.The book sellers // video organizers , ought to be more careful, and a warning that woodworking can be dangerous in the front of the book is not good enough .Thanks for briniging this to our aTTENTion Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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scottz

21 posts in 3659 days


#3 posted 10-16-2008 07:00 PM

That looks familar – what video is it?

I saw something very similar recently and I remembered not feeling great about it.

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CharlieM1958

16276 posts in 4367 days


#4 posted 10-16-2008 07:04 PM

How does stuff like this get out in public??? Looks like what-not-to-do video!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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NY_Rocking_Chairs

515 posts in 3746 days


#5 posted 10-16-2008 07:04 PM

If the intent is to cut the dado in the same place on all boards…what I have seen done is to clamp a piece of wood to the fence, but it ends before the piece being cut hits the dado. So you still use the mitre guage in the slot as Scotsman said and just push it against the temporary fence to get it aligned and then run it over the dado.

Or else use a sled where he could mount a block to simulate the fence position.

The idea of passing my hand over top of anything spinning at 1750+RPMs makes me very nervous.

-- Rich, anybody want a peanut?

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Bob #2

3810 posts in 4170 days


#6 posted 10-16-2008 07:13 PM

I kind of hate to tell you all this but if you want to see the entire video go here

These folks are generally pretty reliable so I am assuming this one must have just slipped by.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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Tony

986 posts in 4179 days


#7 posted 10-16-2008 07:19 PM

A very good demonstration on how not to do it and how to cause a major accident. Definitely would use a mitre gauge or sledge, as the cutting width is narrower than the length of the board.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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Tony

986 posts in 4179 days


#8 posted 10-16-2008 07:24 PM

Thanks for the link Bob – At least he used a push block on the final pieces, I guess he did not want to spoil the finish of the wood with bits of Blood, Bone and Flesh!!!!!!

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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Lee A. Jesberger

6864 posts in 4128 days


#9 posted 10-16-2008 07:33 PM

Hi Bob;

Good post.

I am surprised at both, Fine Woodworking and Mario Rodriguez for showing this. Mario is a tremendous craftsman, very well versed in the safety rules of all woodworking machines. In addition this to not being a safe practice, everyone here knows my position about not having a splitter on the table saw.

And I know the likely response from both, about both. “As a professional I’ve been doing this, using this method for x number of years, and nothing has every happened”.

That’s exactly what the guy that fell off a building said somewhere around the 17th floor. I’ve been doing this for 20 floors now, and have never had a problem.

A very bad display for beginning woodworkers, especially, but even those with experience might see this as an accepted method.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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sIKE

1271 posts in 3903 days


#10 posted 10-16-2008 07:39 PM

This looks like a bad idea, but if you are using a miter gage up against a fence like his you too are asking for kick back. If you are going to use a miter gage you need place a small spacer on the fence several inches before the blade so as the piece moves forward it is no longer up against anything.

My main issue with the cut above is that he has two fingers and his thumb in the path of the blade, if anything were to go wrong his fingers are exactly where they shouldn’t be. With a dado that close to the fence and dado stack, he should have a hold down clamped to the fence and some type of push stick for his right hand.

I have cut dadoes with both hands on the board up against the fence, mainly when the dado is in the center of a large panel. When I have a dado to do like this I prefer to use my Grr-Riper.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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CedarFreakCarl

594 posts in 4202 days


#11 posted 10-16-2008 07:56 PM

There you go stirring the pot again Bob…..lol! All kidding aside, I can’t believe this guy has all his fingers as he should at least be using some type of gripper/jointer push pad etc. Geez. Thanks for posting.

-- Carl Rast, Pelion, SC

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ChuckV

3171 posts in 3676 days


#12 posted 10-16-2008 08:14 PM

I only do this when I need to trim my fingernails – just kidding!

Being fairly new to woodworking, I have a related question. Suppose that instead of cutting a dado, he were cutting a groove parallel to the long dimension of the stock. If he also used a pusher of some sort to keep his hand out of harm’s way, would it then be safe to use the rip fence?

- Thanks.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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Bob #2

3810 posts in 4170 days


#13 posted 10-16-2008 08:26 PM

I bought a Dadowiz to avoid having to run tht risk of kickback on the tablesaw.
One advantage is that you can cut both sides at once eliminating error or asn mi my case duplicating same. <g>
This is a video of a similar device from shopnotes. I love shopnotes

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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Bob #2

3810 posts in 4170 days


#14 posted 10-16-2008 09:51 PM

Lee: “I am surprised at both”

Me too they have been very consistent over the years.

Sike: “This looks like a bad idea, but if you are using a miter guage up against a fence like this you too are asking for kick back
I personally don’t use the fence for this procedure. If I do more than one consectutive dado at the same setting I would place an offset on the fence below the blade line to get the position then run the board through using the miter. It’s an extra measurement doing it this way.
(I still prefer the router for safety reasons)

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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scottz

21 posts in 3659 days


#15 posted 10-16-2008 10:19 PM

That’s the video I thought it was.

Mario knows more about woodworking than I will ever know and maybe he’s done that a thousand times, but I would never be comfortable doing it.

ChuckV – Assuming there is absolutely no “pinch” in the fence’s allignment to the saw blade, what you described would be a much safer operation in my opinion. You would have more fence-to-stock contact and your hands would be away from the blade.

All that being said, I’m always extra cautious when the splitter and guard is off the saw which is a requirement when you’re not doing through cuts. I’ve only had a table saw kick a workpiece back at me once and I was unscathed, but I remember it very well.

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