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Question regarding riveting

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 05-18-2013 10:15 PM 823 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1031 days


05-18-2013 10:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rivet rivet gun

I bought a rivet gun from Harbor Freight and overall it seems to work well (it got good reviews on their site: http://www.harborfreight.com/heavy-duty-17-1-2-half-inch-hand-riveter-with-collection-bottle-66422.html). I riveted some plastic from a pop bottle today to my separator trash can and the rivets came out well on the front but the back they’re a bit “mushroomy”. I was under the impression that both front and back would be nice and flat against the trash can. Am I doing something wrong or is this how rivets look on the back side? This is my first time riveting anything, ever, so please be gentle in calling me a newb :)

Front:

Back:

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


20 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7550 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 05-18-2013 10:18 PM

No. That’s what they do. You can hammer them flat after
though. You have to back up the other side with a
sandbag or hunk of metal to do it well.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1031 days


#2 posted 05-18-2013 11:30 PM

Gotcha, makes sense. Glad it’s not the tools fault cuz I quite like it actually. I’ll hammer the next ones I do if they need to be flattened, these really don’t plus I already put hvac tape on the joints to seal them. Thanks for letting me know.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2905 posts in 1140 days


#3 posted 05-18-2013 11:40 PM

If they need to be flat on the inside, rivet from that side.
Smacking them with a hammer to flatten them is going to loosen them up.

If you want flat rivets on both sides use real, solid rivets with the proper tool and bucking bar.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3627 posts in 2387 days


#4 posted 05-18-2013 11:43 PM

Loren’s right! You can minimize the amount of schmooshed-over backside by selecting POP rivets that closely match the thickness of the two materials you’re joining together. What I see in your photo looks like it would require only a POP rivet with a 1/8” depth, and it looks like you’ve used 1/4” Good work, though!

I’m more uncomfortable with a Harbour Freight review on one of their own tools. That’s gotta be word play and semantics at its finest.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View taoist's profile

taoist

110 posts in 1144 days


#5 posted 05-18-2013 11:58 PM

Maybe one of the reasons they mushroomed was because those are what’s called blind rivets, pop rivets, or Cherry Max rivets. The only rivets, that I know of, that use use a rivet gun for installing are solid rivets and are different than the ones in the pictures.
You also need a rivet set of the proper type for the rivets and air hammer/rivet gun you’re using and finally you will need a bucking bar for the opposite end from the head.
The ones in the pics use a manually operated gun or a hydraulic pneumatic pulling device to pull a stem through the rivet sleeve to spread it and then break off at the proper torque. The ones (pom) rivets don’t get installed with an air hammer.

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poopiekat

3627 posts in 2387 days


#6 posted 05-19-2013 12:04 AM

I wouldn’t use any type of percussion force. It’s only a trash can, not a steel beam. Matt P. made the right choices, right tool, and did the right thing.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1031 days


#7 posted 05-19-2013 12:07 AM

Quite honestly I’m not going to go crazy riveting things all the time, just the occasional task like this, so I didn’t want to go crazy spending money on something that will be seldom used. Appreciate all the feedback though, always good to learn new things like what a bucking bar is and the fact that such a thing even exists :) can never have too much knowledge.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#8 posted 05-19-2013 12:18 AM

rivets

why ?

I prefer duct tape and dap

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1254 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 05-19-2013 12:19 AM

you can also use backer washers. they will hold the plastic better.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#10 posted 05-19-2013 12:26 AM

rivets might as well be forever

duct tape

easy breezy cover girl and a screw do magic

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1030 days


#11 posted 05-19-2013 12:29 AM

I second the use of backer washers with riveting plastic. Some plastics will start cracking around the rivet due to the point load in such a concentrated area. the washer would spread it out more reducing the chances of cracking. Don’t think you will have a problem with the pop bottle plastic. just some info for future use. :)

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1567 days


#12 posted 05-19-2013 12:34 AM

Why not just use a tube of E6000 adhesive? Great stuff and sticks to just about everything. You can also get it in clear. This stuff is amazing. I have bought it in electronics stores, HD and others.

http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail.htm

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

448 posts in 1031 days


#13 posted 05-19-2013 12:38 AM

I thought about using construction adhesive but the pop bottle made the plastic just roll right up and I couldn’t get it straightened out. I used rivets because 1) i wanted to try rivets out and why not on this? if it failed no biggie, no harm done and 2) i thought the rivets would hold the plastic in place while I was able to put hvac tape around it, which is exactly what they did :)

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#14 posted 05-19-2013 12:44 AM

dap

I’ve seen a thousand rivets drilled/popped/sunk and drilled a thousand out, from 10 cents a rivet to 300 dollars a rivet

jus sayn

easy breezy uncomplicated tape is often less expensive then commitment.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#15 posted 05-19-2013 12:46 AM

construction adhesive is even worse then a rivet

2 cents

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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