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ebonizing advantages

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Forum topic by mbs posted 435 days ago 741 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mbs

1421 posts in 1539 days


435 days ago

I need to make some pegs for my G&G furniture. I’ve been using ebony stain because I’m too cheap to pay for real ebony. Is there an advantage to ebonizing wood rather than staining it?

thanks,

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.


9 replies so far

View Finisherman's profile

Finisherman

188 posts in 448 days


#1 posted 435 days ago

I’m not sure, but in reading what you wrote, I think that you may be a little bit confused regarding terminology. Ebonizing is the process by which another wood is made to look like ebony. Staining with a pigmented stain is just one way to ebonize wood. There are a number of other ways to ebonize wood that may work even better. You could use a waterborne dye to ebonize your pegs. Be aware, though, that black dyes often have a strong blue or green undertone. I think that your best bet would be to buy some india ink from a crafts store and use that like a stain. Finally, you could try adding the india ink directly to your stain or dye for a really rich, deep, ebony colour.

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kdc68

1942 posts in 876 days


#2 posted 435 days ago

A traditional method
v
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http://www.wwgoa.com/articles/projects/ebonizing-wood/

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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yellabret

43 posts in 801 days


#3 posted 435 days ago

if red oak is an option, i have had very good results “ebonizing” test pieces using the vinegar and steel wool trick. a bolt if steel wool in a pint jar overnight did very well, tho most directions i read called for 48 hours. i was too impatient, but it turned the red oak coal black in 5 minutes or less. try it, it costs next to nothing and is quick, and all you need is a 1” piece of dowel to test it.

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mbs

1421 posts in 1539 days


#4 posted 435 days ago

FInisherman – I was referring to ebonizing as the steel wool / vinegar trick.

Thanks,

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2691 days


#5 posted 435 days ago

Ebonizing the wood has the same effect as staining. It just another method of darkening the wood.

You should try the Ebonizing method and decide for yourself if its a better way.

Both methods only color the surface. The wood type you use for your plugs will make a difference in the results. Then it comes down to your personal taste in the finished product.

-- Nicky

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Don W

14636 posts in 1166 days


#6 posted 435 days ago

I tried ebonizing on my last infill planes. I think it as a different texture than stain. Its a chemical reaction in the wood. Plus it just sounds cool. I have an ebonized infill. Who want a stained anything?

I agree with Nicky, you should try it and decide for yourself.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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yellabret

43 posts in 801 days


#7 posted 435 days ago

needs to be a wood with high tannin content – hence red oak is best. tried it with other woods and got a puke gray. Don is right – it just sounds cool! ask anyone who has milled red oak for slabs like i have and they will tell you about the black areas around old nails. same iron-tannin reaction.

i made a “rocking labrador” out of maple, and tinted the eyes/nose to get the pigment of a yellow lab. later this year i plan on making another out of red oak and ebonizing it to be a black lab. i like this idea way better than stain and certainly not paint, as the grain will sill be evident.

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kdc68

1942 posts in 876 days


#8 posted 435 days ago

”i made a “rocking labrador” out of maple, and tinted the eyes/nose to get the pigment of a yellow lab”

Wow…excellent work yellabret

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View mbs's profile

mbs

1421 posts in 1539 days


#9 posted 435 days ago

Based on the comments it sounds like personal preference without any distinct advantage depending on the type of wood.

Thanks,

MBS

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

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