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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 336 days ago 917 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

9529 posts in 1189 days


336 days ago

Most of my router bits are the purple Grizzly ones. If I replaced them with Whiteside or Freud bits, what differences would I notice immediately? I can buy a whole set of roundover bits from Grizz for what a single bit costs from Whiteside or Freud. Just trying to justify the upgrade.

Edit: I’m only talking about 1/4” shank bits, not large profile bits.

Thanks

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


24 replies so far

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#1 posted 336 days ago

big difference to me, more balanced smoother cut, but I like Grizzly router bits, but I love Whiteside

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 797 days


#2 posted 336 days ago

Whiteside bits are the smoothest cuttin bit Ive used but I would like to try some Infinity heard they cut smooth also

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View nomercadies's profile

nomercadies

495 posts in 838 days


#3 posted 336 days ago

If anyone knows how Diablo bits fit into the comparison, I’d like to know that too. Thanks for asking GF.

-- Chance Four "Not Just a Second Chance"

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3463 posts in 827 days


#4 posted 336 days ago

I don’t know Andy, but I can’t imagine that for hobby woodworking with simple fluted or round over bits that you will notice a huge difference.

I think the Grizzly bits are a pretty darn good value.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1692 posts in 776 days


#5 posted 336 days ago

Good question…I own a few of the purple bits. They are supposed to be the higher grade carbide. They are even cheaper when you buy 3 or more. I own American Eagle bits too, which are considered high quality. Both the Grizzly purple and American Eagle have performed great IMO..
Looking forward to seeing what others will post

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

458 posts in 864 days


#6 posted 336 days ago

stick with the cheapest ones, you will find no difference. i use mostly turn a knives, way cheaper than buying a whole new shank when the bit gets dull or chipped but these are mostly all pattern and morticing bits. also andy i bought a 300 600 grit dmt dia file to sharpen my small profile bits and they work great. the turn a knives run about 5 bucks each and i get 2 times the use out of them and just throw them away if they get chipped. tools today.com

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109219 posts in 2076 days


#7 posted 336 days ago

Maybe it’s psychological because of there cost, but I think they cut much better. I would follow up buy saying that I would not replace all of your router bits to start ,just get one that you use the most and see what you think.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

458 posts in 864 days


#8 posted 336 days ago

remember this andy that high speed tool steel cuts way smother than carbide but dulls faster. all the large profile moulder and shaper knives i make are high speed steel and i can throw the whole head in the grinder when they get dull and high speed steel is less prone to chipping. some carbides will chip by just touching any steel surface but cut like butter on poplar. as far as 1/4 inch shank bits go they are mostly a decent grade of carbide and made by cnc grinders and have to pass ul standards to get into the country i believe. lietz are the best bits imo but are only 1/2 inch drive and above. amana is good as well.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

458 posts in 864 days


#9 posted 336 days ago

i agree with a1 jim

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View gfadvm's profile (online now)

gfadvm

9529 posts in 1189 days


#10 posted 336 days ago

Thanks for the input. I think A1Jim wins the prize for best advice tonight:replace a frequently used bit and make my comparison. Thanks Jim.
That was just too common sense to occur to me!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2300 posts in 1076 days


#11 posted 336 days ago

Better quality bits stay sharper longer, are usually sharper to begin with (noticeable when cutting) and have more carbide for sharpenings.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View robert triplett's profile

robert triplett

1472 posts in 1604 days


#12 posted 336 days ago

Gee Andy, most of my router bits are Vermont American. Maybe that’s why I don’t use a router much! Not much help am I!! I do usually try to buy the better of 2 options if I can
Robert

-- Robert, so much inspiration here, and so little time!

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4735 posts in 1807 days


#13 posted 336 days ago

I have a mix of all sorts of bits…including whiteside, freud and others that I don’t even remember what brand they are. The frued quadra-cut bits do a great job on round overs and rarely ever burn especially since I always cut a bit shy of my desired results and then make a final light pass.
Whiteside are my favorites for the carbide spiral bits and the pattern bits.
I think it is best to try several brands and see what works best for what wood types you use.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work. http://www.FineArtBoxes.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4351 posts in 1341 days


#14 posted 336 days ago

Watched a Marc Adams training video today on routers. Pretty sharp guy. Has the biggest woodworking school in USA.

His advice was pretty logical but it requires comparison shopping. More carbide means more times you can sharpen them. The amount of metal backing the carbide is also a factor. His next comment was how refined is the edge? How well was it milled. Like a well honed chisel.

He mentioned that is how he compares high and low end bits at trade shows.

You would probably need to go to a Rockler or Woodcraft store to compare your favorite cutters.

I understand that Freud Bits are made in Italy if that moves you in any direction.

Report back on what you think?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

1302 posts in 766 days


#15 posted 336 days ago

According to Jim Heavy carbide scraps are remelted and then made into sheets that are in turn made into new bits. The cheaper bits are from the second, third, or fourth remelting. Carbide loses some quality with each re-melt.

The more expensive bits are cut from the first sheet. They last longer, and are better made if you look at them under a microscope.

I agree with A1 Jim. Buy a cheap big set and replace the ones you use most often with better quality bits. When they start to burn on cherry or maple it is probably time to replace them. 1/2 inch shanks will give you much better results.

-- Big Al in IN

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