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Forum topic by GlennsGrandson posted 05-14-2013 11:35 PM 700 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GlennsGrandson

433 posts in 1056 days


05-14-2013 11:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood id unknown wood unknown lumber black spalt black spalting lumber id

Can anyone help Monte and I ID these logs. We picked them up from a lady’s yard in Sioux Falls, SD yesterday. Unfortunately I don’t think that either myself or Monte actually took a picture of the tree that it cam from. It was a big tree and most of it was still standing for the time being. We milled a decent amount of wood yesterday (appx. 1100 BF) with Monte’s new bandsaw mill. I have a few videos but it’ll probably be a couple of days before I get around to uploading those. These logs were very heavy and seemed pretty hard. The pictures seem pretty true for color. It had some sort of spalting going on that was greyish/black and the nonspalted wood seemed very bright white to slightly yellow.





-- Grant - S/N Dakota


18 replies so far

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tefinn

1220 posts in 1184 days


#1 posted 05-15-2013 12:27 AM

I’m far from an expert, but based on the look of the bark I’ld say it was some type of beech.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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chrisstef

11457 posts in 1753 days


#2 posted 05-15-2013 12:54 AM

Id 2nd the beech call.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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Brandon

4145 posts in 1698 days


#3 posted 05-15-2013 12:59 AM

Take a hand plane to a section of it and give us a close up.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1611 days


#4 posted 05-15-2013 01:18 AM

I thought Beech also. Again, not an expert at all. The thin bark and dark center.

Here are some Beech logs.

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GlennsGrandson

433 posts in 1056 days


#5 posted 05-15-2013 01:37 AM

Some planed closer pics




-- Grant - S/N Dakota

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1220 posts in 1184 days


#6 posted 05-15-2013 01:48 AM

Seeing the wood planed and close up I’ll say definitely beech.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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GlennsGrandson

433 posts in 1056 days


#7 posted 05-15-2013 01:53 AM

hmm, thanks everyone. Now, what to do with it (in a couple of years)?

One last question, so the darkness in the middle, is that normal or is that spalting?

-- Grant - S/N Dakota

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 1045 days


#8 posted 05-15-2013 02:06 AM

hackberry but I dont know

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11502 posts in 1437 days


#9 posted 05-15-2013 02:11 AM

The bark looks exactly like our hackberry but unless spalted it is uniformly white throughout.

You guys be careful out there (with no covers).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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YanktonSD

190 posts in 1279 days


#10 posted 05-15-2013 02:14 AM

It is hackberry, you can tell by the bark on the tree. I have mountains of this. It is also known as poormans oak.

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GlennsGrandson

433 posts in 1056 days


#11 posted 05-15-2013 02:25 AM

I am now leaning more towards Hackberry, matches all of the pictures that I look up.

YanktonSD What do you use it for?

-- Grant - S/N Dakota

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tefinn

1220 posts in 1184 days


#12 posted 05-15-2013 03:22 AM

I don’t think what you have is Hackberry. The bark isn’t “knobby” enough.
I posted some links to help illustrate what I mean (tried to post the pics but they were huge).

http://www.ipfw.edu/native-trees/AmericanBeechIconGallery.htm
http://www.ipfw.edu/native-trees/HackberryIconGallery.htm

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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Straightbowed

717 posts in 1045 days


#13 posted 05-15-2013 03:29 AM

beech has horizontal growth on outside of bark, hackenberry has vertical nubbies but I still dont know could be chipperwart wood

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

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Grandpa

3204 posts in 1422 days


#14 posted 05-15-2013 04:32 AM

Looks like Hackberry to me. I am looking at the bark. Beech wood looks like maple. They sometimes call it the other maple. Hackberry is normally pretty white though. Might be whatchacallit.

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YanktonSD

190 posts in 1279 days


#15 posted 05-15-2013 01:51 PM

From what I am told by the old-times is the problem with hackberry is that it stays furry when you try to sand it and it is not good for load bearing because it has a lot of give. I am not sure what to do with it… I cut it out of my oak and walnut groves to have bigger better oak/walnut/elm/cedar/ash. Mostly use it for firewood. Even the pallet guys pass it up, for cottonwood. Cottonwood at least gets harder with age.

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