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The joys of planing

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Forum topic by Mark posted 342 days ago 545 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

313 posts in 473 days


342 days ago

I’ve never tried to flatten a board with a hand plane, never mind a table top. I’m making a Cherry console table for the Mrs. The top is 15 X 54”. The glue up went fairly well (I thought), so all that remained was to flatten it. I was going to hit it with the belt sander and an 80 g belt but I figured what the H… I have an older #5 Stanley I inherited from my dad. All I have for sharpening is a 1000/4000 wet stone and a honing board, but they clean up the chisels quit nicely. I clamped the table top to the bench and after a couple a misfires I was making shavings. To start I went across the grain at about 45°. Is that about right? Now I’m trying to flatten it going with the grain. Definitely need a whack of practice. But damn…What a cool feeling!!


Pardon the mess.

-- Mark


6 replies so far

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Tim

909 posts in 460 days


#1 posted 341 days ago

Welcome to hand planing, I agree it’s a lot of fun. You’ve got guts practicing your planing on a final piece for sure. You don’t need to go at 45 degrees, and there are those that would argue it’s incorrect, but it does seem to work well for some issues with a board. If you want to get the board really flat you’ll want a longer jointer plane and a smoother probably, but if you just want to have some fun and get it basically flat, your jack will do a good job. If you get another iron for it and sharpen it straight across with softened corners or with a very light camber to it, you can use your jack kind of like a smoother.

Another small tip if you don’t have bench dogs and such is to clamp thinner boards to your bench then use those to stop your board. That gets your clamps farther out of the way.

I can definitely recommend The Essential Woodworker by Wearing. It’s designed to get people started with hand tools, and the ebook versions are $10.

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Loren

6738 posts in 2147 days


#2 posted 341 days ago

I usually just use a stop at one end of the bench for
a big board like that. For cross-grain I clamp a narrower
board to the back of the tool tray to act as a second stop.

My bench is against a wall like yours.

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Mark

313 posts in 473 days


#3 posted 340 days ago

Thanks for the tips gents. Tim by longer I assume you mean a #7? A smoother plane. Would that be a #4?

-- Mark

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Tim

909 posts in 460 days


#4 posted 340 days ago

Yes, a jointer is longer and by the Stanley numbers it’s a number 7 or 8, and the most common smoothing plane is the #4 size. Other companies often followed Stanley’s size numbering but some went with completely different numbering. I have a Sargent 409 jack plane that is #5 size for example.

But if it turns out good enough for you without more planes then that’s fine. If you need an excuse to get more toys, then buy all means have fun shopping.

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Mark

313 posts in 473 days


#5 posted 339 days ago

Thanks Tim. By the way don’t confuse guts with inexperienced stupidity. :)

-- Mark

View Don W's profile

Don W

13923 posts in 1066 days


#6 posted 339 days ago

What a cool feeling for sure!!

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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