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Pnuematic nailers and other tools and oiling

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Forum topic by Whiskers posted 476 days ago 764 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


476 days ago

I’ve never owned any Pneumatic tools until recently and have a good quality oil for them but I have a question that is probably really stupid. Can they be over oiled? For instance Rockler a few months ago had the PC brad naiiler on sale for a good price, and it was well reviewed and I am thoroughly enjoying it. But usually when I use it I only drive a dozen or maybe 2 dozen brads at a time. I know conventional wisdom is put a couple drops in each time you use it, but I don’t run a production shop. Should I spread the oiliings out?


14 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7425 posts in 2280 days


#1 posted 476 days ago

You have to use detergent-free oil. Oil with detergents
swells the seals in nailers and that makes them wear out.

I put a drop or two in the nailer every day I use it.

If a nailer is over-oiled it tends to get oil on the wood. I
haven’t had this as a problem since I’ve been drop-oiling
but when I used an in-line oiler it sometimes happened.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1964 posts in 908 days


#2 posted 476 days ago

+ 1 Loren…

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Whiskers's profile

Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


#3 posted 476 days ago

lol, have no idea of it’s detergent qualities but I bought a big bottle of Paslode oil made for pneumatic tools at the Big Blue (Are we allowed to mention store names here? Or is it like that Amaz place) and I can’t imagine having anything else to consider. If there a problem with it let me know so I can take it back. While it wasn’t cheap compared to some alternatives, and I know shops don’t use a special oil for pneumatic tools, I figured at a drop or two at a time the bottle would last forever, and it wasn’t that expensive.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


#4 posted 476 days ago

okay, so yall are saying if I’m using too much oil, I am going to find out real quick and have to burn some brads in scrap.

hmm, okay, that brings up another question, with a new tool, would it be worthwhile to maybe flood it a bit, burn some fasteners in scrap til it stopped spitting just to make sure it initially oiled well?

I know that may seem dumb but I got a refurrb Hitachi Finish nail gun and Framing gun cheap, and a couple HF tools I still haven’t used yet but know I will, So would like to know how best to deal with them.

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1964 posts in 908 days


#5 posted 476 days ago

No expert in brands of pneumatic oil, but you bought oil specific for air tools…so you are good to go

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Loren's profile

Loren

7425 posts in 2280 days


#6 posted 476 days ago

If it’s rated for nailers it should be alright. Paslode makes
nailers so I expect you’re good.

There is oil for sanders, impact wrenches and other
pneumatic tools too. It is different stuff I think.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3891 posts in 960 days


#7 posted 476 days ago

a few drops every work session…. maybe more if you’re framing or roofing all day…. does the trick…

as noted… too much and it just sprays out the exhaust or trails the nails.

having a dedicated branch or air line set up with a mister and regulator (to adjust fastener depth) is a nice way to set up.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


#8 posted 476 days ago

Thanks ssnvet. Well my super high tech HF compressor has a regulator on the end of it that seems to work well. Nice thing about the PC brad nailer is it has a little thumb wheel to adjust the depth. It likes heavy pressure, 95 lbs or so but the depth is easily adjusted in scrap depending on the length of the brads. I like to set them in just below the surface so i can give the holes a little filler. It’s great for tacking 1/4” ply into cabinet frames.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1253 posts in 580 days


#9 posted 474 days ago

most of my nailers are over 10 YO. I have PC, HF, Paslode, Bostich, and duofast. My framers get oiled at least 1 every job. My staplers and trim nailers are lucky if they get oiled twice a year. All of my nailers run like the day they were new. with the exception of the framer and roofer, due to the conditions under witch they are used. Dirt, sand, rain, snow and and extreme hot and cold. once a year I open them up and inspect the seals and replace as needed. there is no such thing as over oiling if you want to clean up the mess. I bought an old 3/4” IR impact that was locked up for $5 at a sale. I flipped it so the fitting was up and pulled the trigger and filled it with oil till it came back out of the fitting. I left it sit a few days, then I hooked up the air @ 145 PSI I put a cresent wrench on the mandrill and pulled the trigger first it just blew air. I worked the wrench back and forth and it started to break free. I added more oil and just let it blow through slowly spinning. slowly as it turned it the oil cleaned up the insides and the impack worked like new. the only problem was it blew oil every time I used it for like a month.

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Tedstor

1369 posts in 1265 days


#10 posted 474 days ago

I think Loren pretty much said it best. Use the oil specified by the manufacturer. A small bottle is cheap, and when used sporadically, will last for years. Really no reason for deviation. I have bottle of Bostich brand oil that I use.

But just to be a jerk, I’ll add that I’ve used pretty much every oil-based lube under the sun on my impact wrenches, nailers, die grinders, etc, etc. I’ve never had a problem. Engine oil was commonly used when I worked in an auto shop (imagine that). Some of the old timers had also been using 30W oil and/or ATF on their pneumatics for years without issue. SO with that said, I personally wouldn’t hesitate to use engine oil, compressor oil, mineral oil, or whatever else I had on-hand. I certainly wouldn’t make a special trip to the store for nailer-specific oil if I happened to be out (or couldn’t find my bottle). But I would make it a point to grab a bottle the next time it was convenient.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1008 posts in 918 days


#11 posted 474 days ago

I put about 5 drops in the framing nailer every time I use it. And I’ll very often put some oil in it and fire one last nail into scrap or whatever if I know I’m going to put it away for a while with no framing work to do for a few months. My smaller nailers get pretty much the same treatment but with a little less oil. When they’re not in use, they’re in their case to keep them as clean as I can. They aren’t great nail guns. They’re ok. All I want is that when I pull the trigger, a nail comes out. :)

Clearing jams sucks so I try to make sure I don’t get any jambs. I’ve had exactly 1 jamb in all the time I’ve had the nailers. I’ve used some crappy nailers (not mine) and when the nailer is so bad to just use a hammer instead….. well… that’s not how I want mine to work. hehehe

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Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


#12 posted 467 days ago

Oddly, in my PC brad nailer I’m getting a lot of jams, but not thru the firing mech. The spring loading mech is either a bit sloppy or too strong and is breaking the strip and jamming the feed. Works great once the pieces are finally removed and reloaded in small pieces. I like the tool otherwise though, so think I’ll just make a point of breaking the strips up as I load them into thirds. Unless anyone has a better suggestion.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7425 posts in 2280 days


#13 posted 467 days ago

Try a different brand of brads.

While the spring is usually strong enough to break
stacks of brads, there should be something that
holds them flat in the magazine. How this works
varies from nailer brand to brand. It may need
some fiddling in your nailer.

Make sure the brads are positioned as far forward
as possible in the magazine. There are little grooves
for the heads of the different sizes. Set the brads
too far back and the nailer won’t work as well.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Whiskers

389 posts in 659 days


#14 posted 467 days ago

The brads I have are Bostitch. I’ve been trying to buy “good” quality stuff for my tools. Isn’t Bostitch considered one of the top brands? Like I say, only time I have problem is if I give the tool a whole stick. It breaks the stick, than it doesn’t feed forward no more. Can be a real bear to open the magazine back up and extract the pieces. lol, guess that better than having it jam thru the firing mech.

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