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Question about pattern router bits and procedure for cutting router table hole.

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Forum topic by Whiskers posted 05-05-2013 11:38 PM 634 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Whiskers

389 posts in 723 days


05-05-2013 11:38 PM

Well I’ve just received a Incra mast-r-II and their template for cutting a hole in a table and I have also been studying the process of creating the proper hole in the table. First snag of course is even though I bought a nice set of bits from MLCS, not a single one of them is a pattern bit. They gave me a nice selection of flush trim bits, but no pattern bits. OK, no biggie. Shopping around the best thing I’ve found so far is the Whiteside bits from Hartville tools. Very price competitive with MLCS and Freud offerings. A buck or two more, but the rep may be worth it as these are not large expensive bits. I was thinking of getting the 1/2×1/2 on a quarter shank (can’t find such a small critter on 1/2” shank) for the final shallow hole the plate fits on top of. I can also use it mount the new Kreg clamp plate thingy I got. I also thought I would get a 1 1/8 diam. x 1 with 1/2” shank bit for any future template work as I mostly work with 3/4” materials. Whiteside recommends against buying their smaller products with 1/2” shaft as the bearings are apparently too delicate. That 2nd bit has no bearing on the router table though, just looking down the road.

Now on to the real question. What is the best Method for attacking this job. What I was thinking was Layout the hole and drill 4 holes in very rough position a bit inside on one of the table surfaces. Than cut that out using a common jig saw just to get a ugly hole in it. Than attach the template somehow to the table so it won’t be moving and using a straight bit with my PC type template guides (Rockler) to cut a pretty smooth hole that is 1/4” or whatever (odd this is not in the instructions, need to call or email them) smaller than the template. Than use the 1/2×1/2 pattern bit to cut the recess for the plate to drop into to match the template. Glue the two pieces of top together, repeat the jigsaw cutting operation and than use a bit to trim the bottom piece to match the top.

Does this sound right or am I totally reading this wrong?


3 replies so far

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Dallas

3063 posts in 1184 days


#1 posted 05-05-2013 11:48 PM

I have cut out nice circles using a forstner bit and a flush cut bit.
First, cut out the largest hole you can with the Forstner.
Select the largest flush cut bit and remove the bearing.
Replace bearing with the smallest bearing you have.
Use resulting bit to enlarge one side of the forstner bit hole.
Turn workpiece over and repeat.
On the last cut, put the original bearing back on to even up all the sides.

It took more to type it than it does to do it.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Whiskers

389 posts in 723 days


#2 posted 05-05-2013 11:51 PM

Interesting idea but I’m cutting a rectangle, not a circle. I’ll keep that technique in mind if I need to cut a circle.

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Dallas

3063 posts in 1184 days


#3 posted 05-05-2013 11:53 PM

It works for a rectangle also. Cut out the shape with a sabre saw square it up as needed and use the flush cut in the same manner.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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