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Set up for Porter Cable 4213 template when cutting box joints

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Forum topic by Ton80 posted 453 days ago 1344 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ton80

7 posts in 530 days


453 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: jig 4210 4213 box joints

Hello,

I searched G for info on this but came up with nothing so I figure it’s time to ask the experts. I broke out my PC 4210 last night to cut some box joints. Using the included manual as a guide all went smoothly on my test cuts. I then set the jig up for the Cherry pieces I wanted to join. I used corner ‘A’ to set up the jig and then went through and cut all 4 corners worth of joints. I did test the first corner and it was good but each corner cut after that are not aligning properly. All outside faces were placed either against the jig or away from it in the proper orientation, everything butted up to the stop plates and aluminum plates properly.

The manual doesn’t state the need to precisely center or line up the wood relating to the side to side placement in the jig except on the right side cut for the second piece. On this set up you center the fingers between the aluminum template and slide the stop plate over. Note, nowhere does it say this has to be exact so I am assuming as close as your eye can determine center is fine. For the first piece, I also tried to center the piece the best I could by eye since no comments are made in the manual about lining up this piece except to line up the marks on the template where the good piece and scrap piece meet.

Obviously something is wrong with the way I did this because the other 3 joints I cut are all out of alignment so that the edges of what would be my cabinet box don’t line up. The fit of the fingers are fine. Is it necessary to set up each joint ( the 2 cuts ) independent of each other or can you set one and just cut the remaining 3 for a 4 sided box?

thx,
John

-- struggling to make a living at what I love doing... thanks for making it so difficult Vampire State.


6 replies so far

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 880 days


#1 posted 452 days ago

Maybe this will help
http://www.rockler.com/tech/RTD10000211AA.pdf

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1840 posts in 2164 days


#2 posted 452 days ago

I’ve found that centering is very critical and I use feeler gauges to center the stops.

But – even more important in my opinion is to use only one stop for all the cuts, my preference being the left stop. This way if you are off a little on the centering it will not keep the corners of your box from lining up.

The way I do this is:
1. Cut the joints on one of of the stock with the “inside” surface of the stock against the body of the jig.
2. Flip the stock end for end and cut the opposite end of the stock with the “outside” surface of the stock away from the body of the jig.
3. Repeat steps 1&2 for the rest of the sides.

-- Joe

View Farrout's profile

Farrout

156 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 452 days ago

I just bought a 4216 last week.
I’ve been doing some experimental cuts, and I’m going to try to recreate what you have this weekend.
I’ll let you know the results.

-- If we learn from our mistakes, I should be a genius!

View Ton80's profile

Ton80

7 posts in 530 days


#4 posted 452 days ago

Joe, that is interesting.. Maybe I will retry cutting some samples tomorrow using your method of all cutson the left side of the jig. I figure its because my center was probably a slight bit off which compounded the error..

Bottom line is its possible to set and forget if I am running pieces that are all the same width…

-- struggling to make a living at what I love doing... thanks for making it so difficult Vampire State.

View Farrout's profile

Farrout

156 posts in 1757 days


#5 posted 451 days ago

I came up with an idea for alignment that may work.
I took a piece of scrap (this process seems to take a lot of ‘scrap’) the same width as the finish piece.
As a ‘first board’ cut, rather than use the 1/2” bit, I used a 1/4” bit.
The teeth on the jig are 1/4” wide, so when you move the piece to the right and slide it up, there
is a tight fit on the jig. Now you can set the right index. Perfect alignment.
I’m going to test this some more also using Joe’s method.
(Note: the pictures are for a test and do not use measured width pieces.)

UPDATE:
You can use a piece of the final assembly to do the 1/4” cuts. Save a piece of scrap.
I used the method plus flipping the boards per Joe,
Here is my result. I’m satisfied.

-- If we learn from our mistakes, I should be a genius!

View Ton80's profile

Ton80

7 posts in 530 days


#6 posted 450 days ago

Nice! So after you set up the right side using the 1/4” cuts did you run all the pieces of the test box on that one setup? I didn’t have time to retry my box again but I think between your info and Joe’s idea I should be able to set up and run it again. Still haven’t figure out why my first joint fit and the other 3 were off but hoping to solve it with this info

-- struggling to make a living at what I love doing... thanks for making it so difficult Vampire State.

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