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Voids in oak

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Forum topic by AandCstyle posted 05-02-2013 06:31 PM 871 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AandCstyle

1474 posts in 1004 days


05-02-2013 06:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: oak

I have a piece of white oak that I want to use. Unfortunately, it has some voids in it. They are only on one face of the piece meaning that they don’t go all the way through. I seem to recall that the piece can be stabilized by filling the voids with glue or glue and sanding dust. Any particular type of glue? Is anyone aware of this and able to fill in the voids in my memory? :) Also, to satisfy my curiosity, is there a proper term used in woodworking to describe this?

Thanks for any assistance.

-- Art


20 replies so far

View madts's profile

madts

1298 posts in 1087 days


#1 posted 05-02-2013 06:52 PM

I would add some oak flour to some 5 minute epoxy and cram it into the checks, and never look back.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

435 posts in 1440 days


#2 posted 05-02-2013 07:02 PM

Art

That would be called a “Check” in the wood.

Here is an article that I bookmarked some time ago about these and other “problem areas” in wood floors but it can be used to help here.

http://hardwoodfloorsmag.com/articles/article.aspx?articleid=1552&zoneid=1

Madts is right spot on about the solution

-- Measure twice and cut once.....Steve Lien

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

337 posts in 999 days


#3 posted 05-02-2013 08:02 PM

What I’ve done with similar cracks is to first apply masking tape around the perimeter of the crack or check. This is to limit how far the epoxy spreads and to reduce the amount of sanding that you will have to do later. Next mix up the oak flour and 5 minute epoxy and apply it over the voids. Now cover the epoxy with a piece of waxpaper. Put a caul over the waxpaper and clamp the caul to your good piece of wood. The clamping pressure will force the epoxy/saw dust mixture into the voids.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3582 posts in 2708 days


#4 posted 05-02-2013 08:34 PM

Yep. Epoxy, and color/fill as ya wish.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1474 posts in 1004 days


#5 posted 05-03-2013 12:39 AM

Thanks for the replies. It appears that my memory was sorta, kinda close. :) I was thinking cyanoacrylate glue for some reason. Steve, that is an interesting article; previously, I had only thought of checking in end grain. MisterBill, that is a good suggestion. I would probably have tried to apply it with a putty knife.

When I finish this project, I will post pix.

-- Art

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11504 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 05-03-2013 01:37 AM

Art, Thanks for posting this. The railroad dunnage I worked with recently had a lot of these ‘checks’. I just filled them with Timbermate grain filler but was concerned with the permanence of that fix. It’s a LOT quicker and easier than epoxy but probably doesn’t work as well.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1474 posts in 1004 days


#7 posted 05-03-2013 02:34 AM

Andy, sharing info and knowledge is what it is all about. I hope your project holds up well.

-- Art

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11504 posts in 1437 days


#8 posted 05-03-2013 02:36 AM

That’s why this is such a great site: sharing info and knowledge with like minded people.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

337 posts in 999 days


#9 posted 05-03-2013 11:08 AM

One other good trick is to mix your epoxy in the inside corner of a sandwich bag. When you are ready to apply it, make a small cut in the corner off of the bag and use it similar to a cake icer.

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4145 posts in 1699 days


#10 posted 05-03-2013 12:29 PM

MisterBill, does that actually work with epoxy? I use that method all the time with other stuff, but epoxy will melt thin plastics—I mixed it once in a dixie cup and that was almost an epic failure.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6968 posts in 1661 days


#11 posted 05-03-2013 12:45 PM

The only thing I would add is to use a 1in paint spatula/scraper to help force the epoxy/glue into the void. I have even used a paperclip tip on occasion to get the glue/epoxy down into the groove before it sets up (and use clamps of course). My 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

337 posts in 999 days


#12 posted 05-03-2013 06:17 PM

Brandon,

The method that I described works fine with a plastic sandwich bag. I have never had a problem with it. It is is a neat (clean) way to apply epoxy and there is practically no mess involved.

MisterBill

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1168 days


#13 posted 05-03-2013 06:26 PM

If this board is already to your finished dimensions then all of the above advice is good.

If it is still oversized, or rough cut, you can rip the board at the area of the check, joint it and then reglue it back together. The grain will match nicely with no fillers and no more check.

You would need to be careful to use a splitter, or riving knife when you rip this board since the check indicates internal stresses during the drying of this board.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1474 posts in 1004 days


#14 posted 05-04-2013 12:48 AM

More good suggestions. My thanks to everyone!

-- Art

View NewEnglandsWoodWorks's profile

NewEnglandsWoodWorks

117 posts in 1349 days


#15 posted 05-04-2013 12:58 AM

Just put some normal wood glue in it and rub some sawdust in.

-- Brett

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