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Forum topic by uMinded posted 05-01-2013 04:13 PM 1609 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


05-01-2013 04:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jointer

First off I live in Canada so immediately half my tool choices are cut out of the list. I am in the process of building a new garage and am working some overtime to outfit it with some new tools.

Currently I am using a home made 12” disc sander with a DIY jointer fence and it works surprisingly well. My only real problem is the speed of material removal and after a few boards the PSA adhesive starts to loosen up. The only two things I use my “jointer” for are squaring spruce stock for benches and yard stuff and the occasional oak/maple edge banding.

Grizzly G0725
This caught my eye because of its low price, I do not have a lot to spend and the only difference between it and a $500 6” jointer seems to be a stand and large table. With some care and a few layers of baltic birch I can easily extend the table. My only concern is its running the cutterhead at 10,000RPM while all the other 6” models are running at 4800RPM, is that too fast?

Does anybody own this jointer and are their any complaints?
Does anybody know of any better 6” jointers for under $400?


19 replies so far

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1443 posts in 1356 days


#1 posted 05-01-2013 04:26 PM

I think the higher RPMs is a result of using a universal motor, rather than a belt driven motor. And the high RPMs compensate for the two-knife cutterhead (most bigger machines use three knives).
The downsides to that machines are:
Small tables, which you already mention.
Universal motor, which will be louder and less powerful
Two knife cutter head.
Dinky dust port. I manage to clog my 4” dust port on occasion. I’d imagine a 2.5” to be worse.

All downsides can be worked around. Plenty of people do it.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6960 posts in 1637 days


#2 posted 05-01-2013 05:08 PM

Just my opinion here. You can find 6in jointers on CL all of the time. If you have alternate listings, newspapers, classifieds, etc. then use them as well. Many folks start with a 6in and then move up the food chain to 8in or larger jointers. That said, in most cases, buying “new” 6in jointers is not advised if at all possible. This is NOT about poor quality about any of the equipment, just the rather abundant supply of used 6in jointers on the market. Just a thought…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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jap

1237 posts in 777 days


#3 posted 05-01-2013 05:27 PM

try kijiji.ca for used equipment in canada.

-- Joel

View uMinded's profile

uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#4 posted 05-01-2013 05:48 PM

Thanks for the info. I took a look at the repair manual and it is a universal motor but has a timing belt drive so changing the RPM would be a simple pulley and belt modification.

My original plan was to mount a jointer to a standard size cabinet with a hole cut in the top for shavings to fall into a pull out bin. I do not have a 4” dust collector and doubt my dust deputy and 16gal Rigid shop vac could handle a jointers shavings.

Given the downsides do you think its worth $300 (after shipping and modifications)?

I live in Saskatchewan and the used tool market out here is awful, Been looking every week for 4 months and the only ones are usually 80’s craftsmen 4” models for $200.

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#5 posted 05-01-2013 06:14 PM

Another point is a jointer one of those tools that are better to have a cheap one than not one at all? I found this out with my crappy Ryobi band saw, its got horrible runout and wobbles but I use it almost every day…

I was reading on woodgeard.ca on his shop built 12” he built a jointer from a broken thickness plainer. I could never afford a 12” jointer and my favorite hobby is building tools…

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2011 posts in 1000 days


#6 posted 05-01-2013 09:47 PM

+1 HM....

”Just my opinion here. You can find 6in jointers on CL all of the time. If you have alternate listings, newspapers, classifieds, etc. then use them as well. Many folks start with a 6in and then move up the food chain to 8in or larger jointers. That said, in most cases, buying “new” 6in jointers is not advised if at all possible. This is NOT about poor quality about any of the equipment, just the rather abundant supply of used 6in jointers on the market. Just a thought”
v
v

uMinded....you should be able to find a good used 6” jointer under $400.00

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#7 posted 05-01-2013 10:37 PM

6” jointers in my area are quite rare. There is a Beaver/Rockwell 6” on Kijiji now for $400 but its 20+ years old and needs new blades and I can buy a new King 6” for $445 after tax.

Their is a 4” Craftmaster one for $175 but once again why not just get the Grizzly brand new for $250.

If I could get the 4” Craftmaster for $150 do you think it would be a better quality machine?? Its big enough I can true up the majority of my projects but if I need to put any money into it it better be worth more than the Grizzly.

View Cole Tallerman's profile

Cole Tallerman

392 posts in 908 days


#8 posted 05-02-2013 12:54 AM

just saying, most people wish they had at least 8 inches immediately after they buy a 6 inch. I had barley any budget so I built a 12 inch jointer for under $200. I got the plans off of woodgears.ca The jointer will grudgingly face joint a 12” board. Its truly great to have endless capacity.

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#9 posted 05-02-2013 04:25 AM

Cole: I plan on building the 12” woodgears jointer as well but a thickness plainer (even working still) comes up on CL and Kijiji even less often than jointers unfortunately. I have even been to auctions and it just seems my province only has ancient farm machinery or nothing at all…

If anybody has converted their jointer or plainer into a helical head and has the strait blade assembly still I would totally buy it.

View camps764's profile

camps764

802 posts in 1083 days


#10 posted 05-02-2013 12:10 PM

Didn’t read all of the replies sorry if I duplicate here, but…

I had the shop fox version of that six inch jointer….I had the same “a small tool is better than no tool ideology” I HATED the thing and sold it after it sat on my bench collecting dust.

I know there are guys out there that use the short bench top jointers very well, but I could not get it to work very well for anything longer than about 12”.

My advice – and I know it is hard because I struggle with it myself – would be to start setting aside the extra money to get a full size. If you can afford the $270 for the small jointer put that somewhere safe and start putting an extra 20-40 aside a week until you can afford a nice used jointer.

Another option – the route I went for the short term – was to get a used Stanely no. 7 jointer off ebay, and a set of sharpening stones – I’ve had a blast learning to joint by hand – although realistically I probably have spent about $250 on the setup.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#11 posted 05-02-2013 01:37 PM

camps764: Thanks for the input, what where your exact complaints about the 6” beckhop model?

I need a set of planes and was thinking jointer, jack, #5/#7, apron/block, chamfer and maybe a 3/4” shoulder and if I want to do exotic small detail work hand planes are a necessity I think.

I have read a few books on making your own planes and as I require a power jointer for the quantity of dimensional lumber I use I could easily use it to make my own fleet of hand planes while I’m at it.

I have found a Makita power planer for a very reasonable price, with the right technique could it be a better investment than the 6” bench model until a used one pops up?

View LakeLover's profile

LakeLover

275 posts in 663 days


#12 posted 05-02-2013 01:37 PM

uMinded Were are you at ?

I am just outside of Regina.

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#13 posted 05-02-2013 01:39 PM

LakeLover: 10km north of Saskatoon….

...I think I can see you house from here! lol

View mikema's profile

mikema

175 posts in 1309 days


#14 posted 05-02-2013 01:57 PM

Some areas decent jointers priced right on craigslist are a rarity. As for the bench top jointer, just don’t. I had one and struggled with it for years, its not worth the effort. If used jointers are not common in your area, save up for a decent floor model jointer.

-- Mike ---- Visit my woodworking blog: http://sawdustnewbie.com

View GregD's profile

GregD

634 posts in 1859 days


#15 posted 05-02-2013 02:46 PM

I have seen one thread from someone that really liked their benchtop jointer because they only use it for small-sized work pieces. The rule of thumb I’ve heard is that a jointer can handle stock about 2 times the total length of the jointer. From my experience, it takes some experience to manage that.

But what do you want to use the jointer for? The alternatives for edge jointing are, IMHO, more palatable than the alternatives for face jointing.

I don’t think I ever use my jointer without also using my thickness planer. While I much prefer face jointing on the jointer, because mine is only 6” I’ve had occasions to face joint on my planer and it works just fine. This does require long pieces of nominally 1/4” thick scrap with a straight edge. So if I only had the cash for one, I’d probably get a decent planer.

-- Greg D.

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