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outdoors window ledge what wood?

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Forum topic by Charlie posted 352 days ago 556 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1001 posts in 786 days


352 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Making a “cute” garden shed for the wife. I am insetting the window a bit so there will be a window ledge exposed outside. I can put a bevel on it so it will shed water, and it will be under a 2 foot roof overhang, but I could envision snow blowing onto it or maybe wind driven rain getting on it.

What would be a good wood to use there? Not something exotic, please. I mean…. could I just take a doug fir 2x and put a good oil-based primer and paint on it? I’d love to use a stone ledge, but I don’t have one wide enough. :)


11 replies so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

11817 posts in 1834 days


#1 posted 351 days ago

We use mostly fir here in Norway, but it’s nice if you can find a straight grained piece that comes from the center of the tree or is quarter sawn so it won’t warp.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Don W's profile

Don W

13926 posts in 1067 days


#2 posted 351 days ago

white oak would be good.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

628 posts in 936 days


#3 posted 351 days ago

Cedar is a good choice.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1079 posts in 1263 days


#4 posted 351 days ago

Redwood.

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

398 posts in 1694 days


#5 posted 351 days ago

Here in the south my house was trimmed in southern yellow pine. You have to keep priming and painting every 5 years or so. And make sure the joints are caulked. Recently I’ve started replacing some rotted frames and sills with plastic versions. That’ll never rot out. Lowe’s and HD have versions of most trim in plastic.

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

605 posts in 1810 days


#6 posted 351 days ago

Redwood. If you cannot get redwood, then insist upon Redwood. If all else fails, demand Redwood

-- Rustfever, Central California

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

1496 posts in 356 days


#7 posted 351 days ago

I would say more important than what you use is how you install it. Paint it like you said and make sure water can’t get behind it. Caulk to the window.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

2982 posts in 1175 days


#8 posted 351 days ago

I have never seen anything but pine or maybe fir. Paint it will with good paint and primer. Oil base isn’t any better. Might get some arguments there but today there are some good paints out there that are not oil based. Not always been true.

View TheRoux90318's profile

TheRoux90318

19 posts in 672 days


#9 posted 351 days ago

I used Cypress for some window planters coated with outdoor poly…going on 8 years now and still solid.

-- SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9114 posts in 1118 days


#10 posted 351 days ago

Redwood or cypress.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View shelly_b's profile

shelly_b

823 posts in 618 days


#11 posted 351 days ago

i say cedar or redwood

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