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Forum topic by hiswillus posted 04-30-2013 07:11 PM 561 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hiswillus

70 posts in 695 days


04-30-2013 07:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Really need you guys help on this one. I’m a noob making my first dining room table. Bought a slice of tree and am cutting it up and wondering how to handle the cracks. I’ve been advised that even if the cracks don’t enter into my cut piece I should be concerned with the area where the crack would extend to if it were to advance. I’m wondering if there is a safe distance to stay away from a crack (I’m sure there must be) or if something needs to be done regardless. Butterflies have been suggested, but would rather not have them show on the top of the table.

Going to post a couple pics here to see what people suggest. These two slabs are the entire slice of tree cut in half and each is being split to create a four board table top with breadboards added for support. Neither of the pieces have to be long enough to enter the cracked area so I thought I was good, until I learned better. The “if the crack were to continue” can not be avoided on the first piece. The second one I can manage to squeese the 8 inch wide board between the sapwood and the crack.

Please let me know what you think. I look forward to your comments,

Jeff


9 replies so far

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hiswillus

70 posts in 695 days


#1 posted 04-30-2013 07:13 PM

The marked area is far longer than what I need. I simply marked out as long as I could without entering the cracked area. I believe I can get away with staying 5 to 6 inches away form the crack itself.

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RussellAP

2966 posts in 1033 days


#2 posted 04-30-2013 07:23 PM

If the wood is dry and by that I mean properly, you should be able to just cut off the cracked end and be good. 5/4 won’t hold a lot of stress so I’m sure it wont crack.

Nice looking bunch of cherry????

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2966 posts in 1033 days


#3 posted 04-30-2013 07:25 PM

If the wood is still not dry, you need to get some parafin wax and seal it up and sticker it in a dry place at least a foot off the concrete floor for about 6 mos to a year.
Don’t cut the ends off wet.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Monte Pittman

15450 posts in 1085 days


#4 posted 04-30-2013 07:34 PM

It’s wood slabs, unless dried properly it’s going to crack. If you don’t want butterflies on the top, then you put steel straps on the bottom. I don’t mind the butterflies, I just don’t want them to be to high of contrast with the featured wood.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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hiswillus

70 posts in 695 days


#5 posted 04-30-2013 07:42 PM

Why do you assume there were not dried properly. Where I purchase from the wood is usually at about 11 to 12% when I buy it. Should be well into the 8,9 range within a few days of that. The wood has been sitting now for months.

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hiswillus

70 posts in 695 days


#6 posted 04-30-2013 08:00 PM

Ah, it just hit me. So if it’s cracked at all it wasn’t dried properly, got it.

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RussellAP

2966 posts in 1033 days


#7 posted 04-30-2013 09:04 PM

They check either way, just more if not dried properly. Some wood checks no matter what you do.
I had no way of knowing where you got the wood.
So then just cut off the checks and proceed.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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SnowyRiver

51450 posts in 2227 days


#8 posted 04-30-2013 10:24 PM

I tend to stay as far away from the cracks as possible. But if you are able to salvage the piece and havent seen any cracks in it where you have cross cut it, you should be OK. If the piece does crack, you can easily inject epoxy into the crack and clamp it for a good fix. You could also use a butterfly to keep it from cracking further.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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Moron

4724 posts in 2640 days


#9 posted 05-01-2013 02:05 AM

the wider the timber, the more apt/prone it is to cracking/splitting

its normal in many species of wood and for those who think its possible to avoid cracks in 4/4 that are as wide as yours………think again ?

you dont state the purpose of what it will become ?

cut the “crack” out, or cut the “crack” off ……..look for hairline fractures

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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