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board and batten questions

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Forum topic by Charlie posted 04-26-2013 01:11 PM 1151 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1017 posts in 939 days


04-26-2013 01:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Going to put up board and batten on my wife’s garden shed. The shed is 8×10.

Width of boards? I haven’t done this in ages and even back then it was on much larger structures. I’m thinking 1×10 boards with 2 inch battens. Does that sound like it will be ok for scale? That would end up with something like 8 inches of board showing between battens. Or should I go narrower on the boards?

I’m picking up rough sawn Hemlock for this. Not sure how dry it is so was going to put it up and leave it alone for most of the summer and give it a chance to dry up and do its shrinkage thing. Right now my wife says she wants to paint it. I don’t think she’ll complain about not doing it immediately because she hates painting :) And yes, I’m going to let her paint it. It’s her garden shed, after all.

The shed is going to be 2×4 studs on 16” centers on a concrete pad (another story). And I was going to run 2×4s horizontally on the outside as nailers for the board and batten. How far apart should those nailers be?

thanks


10 replies so far

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 541 days


#1 posted 04-26-2013 01:24 PM

Depends on the look you want.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 650 days


#2 posted 04-26-2013 02:41 PM

I have done board and batten with many widths sometimes people like a extremely wide batten, I call this board on board. For my personal taste 2” is a little on the narrow side. If the hemlock is green I would put it on stickers for a while even a couple of weeks if the weather is good and the pile is covered will help a lot. I think you will get a lot of splitting as it dries otherwise. Hemlock really likes to split around the nails as it dries if it is nailed green. I would stud it 24” centers and block between the studs with 2×4 about halfway you can snap a line dead center and alternate the blocking one over the line then next one under the line to make nailing easier. The blocking makes a handy shelf all the way around as a added benefit.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3990 posts in 981 days


#3 posted 04-26-2013 03:05 PM

I used 1×10 for the boards…. 1×6 ripped down the middle for the battens.

Nail the 1×10 at every purlin with two nails ~2” left and right of the CL.

Then nail the battens with one nail in the center at every purlin, so that the nail hits right on the seam of the two boards.

This way the batten pinches the board flat on the edges, but the board is still free to expand and contract a significant amount.

If you’re painting or using opaque stain, put up the boards, let them sit in the sun for a couple weeks. Then paint the ext. surfaces by rolling on the stain thick and brushing it into the grain. Let that get good and dry, and then then stain the battens on saw horses, prior to installing. This way you will avoid uncovering a line of unstained wood when the boards shrink.

I used Baer oil based primer, and then two coats of Baer water clean up, exterior stain (over pine) and four years later it looks as good as the day I painted it.

That’s how I’ve did it. YMMV

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Charlie

1017 posts in 939 days


#4 posted 04-26-2013 03:36 PM

So…. purlins…. you’re only nailing the boards at top, bottom and middle? I was thinking at least 2 kinda evenly spaced between the top and bottom.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 650 days


#5 posted 04-26-2013 03:56 PM

I think top bottom and middle is enough you can put in another one if you want to but I have seen many old barns with wall purlins spaced 4’ or more. You did not say how high your building is but because it is a small building it will be less than 8’ to the eves so if you use a double shoe and a double plate that makes the studs 7.5 feet or less.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1017 posts in 939 days


#6 posted 04-26-2013 04:37 PM

yeah, it’s going to be short of 8ft side walls. My wife is 5’2” :)
I have to leave myself enough height for a door in the gable end wall but she wants it off to one side, not centered. So the side walls have to be tall enough to accommodate a standard door opening.And she needs room to hang shovels and stuff on the walls so….. not too short on those side walls. I’m guess I need something over 7’-6” just to leave room for a door header and get a rough opening height for a standard door. Bottom plate won’t be doubled. It will be pressure treated and on a sill sealer, but not doubled. The top will be doubled as we still have to use a top plate and tie plate. I’m doing something different on top of the wall though….

She wants a 1 foot lookout at the back and 2 foot overhang on the gable end with the door. I’ll be doubling 2×6s to make a “beam” of sorts that will sit on top of the side wall and cantilever out so I can just frame the roof rafters from one end to the other. I’ll add decorative braces, to that large overhang, but can take my time and “make them pretty” like she wants.

I know I don’t HAVE to span the entire top of the wall, but whenever I cantilever, I was taught to go 2 feet IN for every foot OUT. I could ladder the lookout on the 1 foot end, but….. making the beams just seems like a simpler, cleaner solution. At 2 feet I think doubled 2×6s will be ok.

View redryder's profile

redryder

2158 posts in 1754 days


#7 posted 04-27-2013 04:27 AM

Then nail the battens with one nail in the center at every purlin, so that the nail hits right on the seam of the two boards.

When you all are talking about nailing, I’m sure your not really talking about using nails. Right.
What you really want to use are screws. I did my whole house with bat and board and quickly learned that stainless star head screws are the only way to go…...........................

-- mike...............

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 541 days


#8 posted 04-27-2013 11:52 AM

Ring Shank

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2831 posts in 1896 days


#9 posted 04-27-2013 04:05 PM

I haven’t heard anyone address expansion/contraction. You have to leave a gap between boards or they will buckle. I would go with the 1×10’s, but use 1×3’s for battens. Leave a 1/2 space between boards and drive a ring shank nail through the batten between the boards. Use 2 nails per board at the top, middle and bottom close to the edge. The batten will cover the nail heads.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 650 days


#10 posted 04-28-2013 11:31 PM

Ron I have put on a heap of vertical boarding over the years. Some of it dry some of it wringing wet I have never seen any of it swell enough to cause a problem as a rule it will shrink. Air dried 10” pine will usually shrink a good 1/4”. I say put em on as tight as you can and don’t nail too close to the edge or the nails will split out when the board shrinks. I vertical boarded a small barn 2 years ago with air dried spruce, my customer did not want to use batten strips. You can throw a cat through the cracks we are going to batten it later this summer.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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