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Any glue up tips??

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Forum topic by 1yeldud1 posted 460 days ago 1104 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1yeldud1

286 posts in 1643 days


460 days ago

Anybody care to share any glue up tips so a person doesn’t have to sand so much when finishing ?? How to keep glue off finish surfaces, what is the most user friendly glue how to apply with percision, etc.


36 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4749 posts in 1178 days


#1 posted 460 days ago

After a dry fit and all looks well, I shellac my projects first so the glue doesn’t
mess up my the finish. Sometimes I use Watco Danish oil and tape off the
areas of the glue joints when applicable.

Cauls work well to keep flat surfaces flat during glue ups.
http://www.bowclamp.com/

Home made cauls are effective also.
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/12302

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 888 days


#2 posted 460 days ago

Titebond 2, you really can’t keep it off the surface, but if you resist the urge to try and get it off while it’s wet and don’t smear it into the grain, it will simply pop off when its dry.

Use titebond 3 for outdoor or wet stuff.

I like to make jigs to glue up wood, keeps them flat if you clamp them flat as you are clamping them tight. Use some shrink wrap to line the jig. Ask if you need to know how to make a glue jig that will work without spending a lot. Its pretty easy to make and you can use it for all you glue ups.

Be prepared for more instruction you will ever need coming up.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

420 posts in 709 days


#3 posted 460 days ago

I put tape around the perimeter of anywhere I’m likely to get squeeze-out. For panel glue-ups, it’s fast and very efficienct – one long strip of tape on each edge, each side and you’re good to go.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View brtech's profile

brtech

664 posts in 1523 days


#4 posted 460 days ago

Wax the surface where you don’t want glue to stick. The wax cleans off easily with a solvent. You can peel the glue off the waxed surface cleanly.

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1087 posts in 556 days


#5 posted 460 days ago

Brtech, would Minwax finishing paste wax work for that?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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brtech

664 posts in 1523 days


#6 posted 460 days ago

Yeah, it should. Johnsons works. I think the original tip I read used Waxlit.

Easy enough to try it. Get a couple of scraps, make a butt joint, wax on the edges (where you would get squeeze out), glue, clamp and let dry. The squeeze line should just peel right off clean. Then wipe the wax off with mineral spirits, let it dry and make sure your finish isn’t affected. Should work great.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2178 days


#7 posted 460 days ago

I have not used wax it seems like the last thing someone would want on a piece before finishing. I would either pre-finish (making glue easy to wipe off)or use tape on joints like picture frames or or doors. If gluing up panels just let the glue get to a gummy texture and use a card scraper,paint scraper or chisel to skim the excess off,I prefer a card scraper.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1178 days


#8 posted 460 days ago

i like the K.I.S.S. approach.
My main glue is titebond I extend. It has good heat resistance, long open time and a very strong bond. Obviously for things that might come into contact with moisture, I’ll use a type II pva.

The key is to not use a lot of glue. You do want squeeze out, but not enough to the point where it’s running all over your project. Just a nice small bead where the parts meet is indication you have an adequate amount of glue.

For application I use acid brushes with the tips of the brushes trimmed back a bit. This makes them less flexible and easier to control.

For glue removal, what I’ve found works best is the edge of a steel ruler. It works like a mini scraper and you’re able to get into very small crevices.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 888 days


#9 posted 460 days ago

I agree with Jim. Anything you put on the wood save tape is going to affect the finish. Wax is horrible, unless you sand it afterward, so why wax, just sand and the glue will come right off. Like I said earlier, don’t attempt to get the glue off while it’s wet, just wait till it dries and it’s like knocking ice-sickles off your gutter. Plus it’s the easiest suggestion on this page.
I have a chisel that has a long long foot and a slightly angled handle. I dull the chisel with a precise 90 degree angle and use that with a small mallet to knock the glue off. Put that chisel right up against the glue and tap with the mallet and it pops right off. No scar, no stain.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View brtech's profile

brtech

664 posts in 1523 days


#10 posted 460 days ago

The wax is removed with mineral spirits. It doesn’t get into the pores, it just lies on top of the wood. Try it.
Put some paste wax on a scrap, let it dry, clean with mineral spirits, let that dry and try your finish. The glue DOES wick into the wood. You will have more finish trouble with letting the glue sit on raw wood and then trying to clean it then putting down a wax barrier.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 888 days


#11 posted 460 days ago

Brtech, titebond has never wicked far enough into even soft wood that it couldn’t easily be sanded out with 240g. Which I assume he will be doing after the glue up anyway. So why the extra step unless you just like to work.

I’ve found with TBII, that it dries faster than it can wick into dry wood. The surface tension holds it back too long and it dries before getting into the wood. Unless of course you try to wipe it off when it’s wet. Then you’re sanding for sure. But he’s got to sand this down anyway, and it’s hardwood, so I don’t think letting it dry will have any effect on it’s finish.

I will defer to Charles Neil on this though.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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brtech

664 posts in 1523 days


#12 posted 460 days ago

Everyone has their own idea of what is easy and what is not. For me, putting down the wax and cleaning it off is easy, fast, and more foolproof than being much more careful about how much glue I’m using, timing the glue-up to get to the “gummy stage”, scraping it off, and sanding into the corner of a joint. But, as the saying goes YMMV. I was using painters tape, and sometimes I still do, but the wax is easy, fast and cheap.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 888 days


#13 posted 460 days ago

Brtech, I’ve used the tape before too, it works on smaller glue ups better, the long ones always seem to have a couple of seep spots. But like I said, unless it’s some exotic wood, I just let it dry and knock it off then sand through my grits. Never had a problem and it’s far easier than some of the suggestions above.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View RodNGun's profile

RodNGun

118 posts in 904 days


#14 posted 460 days ago

I’d start with a domino

View teejk's profile

teejk

1207 posts in 1285 days


#15 posted 460 days ago

Doesn’t mention whether flat panels or legs. Legs I prefinish everything. Flat panels a REALLY wet wipe immediately after clamping works for me. If I can’t do that, then what Russell says…don’t touch it until it dries. Titebond II tends to form little beads on the surface. I have an old small Stanley plane that knocks the beads off in a hurry. Different with Elmer’s woodworking glue or Titebond I…they tend to absorb more into the wood (again…what Russell said).

showing 1 through 15 of 36 replies

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