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6" or 8" stacked dado set for Bosch 4100

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Forum topic by crazybrit posted 464 days ago 2714 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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crazybrit

5 posts in 598 days


464 days ago

I’ve read lots of posts recommending 6” dado for jobsite saws due to low power but these saws are always 1.5-2hp. I’ve also read posts recommending 6” for direct-drive saws, but I’m not sure if this is because then tend to be in this hp range?

I have a Bosch 4100. Supposedly it’s rated at 4hp but it is direct drive.

I’m looking to buy my first dado set to play around with and was thinking of getting the Oshlun http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012YILDQ

I can’t imagine that I’ll ever need to cut a dado deeper than 1-1/8” and the 6” will put less stress on the motor but if the 4100 has plenty of power to handle the 8”, I thought maybe I’d get the 8” Oshlun (or maybe the
DEWALT DW7670, I guess all the closeouts on the equiv Delta 35-7670 have ended).

Any advice?

From the customer images (for the 6”) it seems the Oshlun might now come with a decent case http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B0012YILDQ/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_3?ie=UTF8&index=3


15 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5371 posts in 1979 days


#1 posted 464 days ago

For that saw I’d be inclined to go with a 6” set. AFAIK the Bosch has a 15 amp motor, which is realistically just about 1.5 usable sustainable hp. If it was really 4hp, it’d be run on 220v.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2596 days


#2 posted 464 days ago

the only advise i ever give when it comes to blades is you get what you pay for. good cuts and dados have more to do with the blade then the saw. i have owned many dados over the years and wish i would have spent the money up front to buy a good one to start with. I happen to be a big fan fo the forest and frued brands when it comes to blades. you are also best off with a 6 inch set on a saw this size so you dont over work the motor.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1094 posts in 573 days


#3 posted 464 days ago

Bear in mind on many jobsite saws you can’t put the entire stack on there, some only go to a half inch at most. Depending on the arbor. I know that the Bosch is probably the best jobsite saw, but I would be inclined to go with the 6. I use a 6 on my jobsite saw and it does just fine, I can only cut a half inch at most, just take a couple more passes. 6 is much less weight on the smaller saws

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 493 days


#4 posted 464 days ago

I use a bosch 4100 table saw and 8” dado stack. More than enough power, cut dados like butter.

My thought was to turn this saw into a dedicated Dado saw when my Cabinet saw arrives.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View tsdahc's profile

tsdahc

75 posts in 955 days


#5 posted 464 days ago

I had a bosch 4100 with the 6” oshlun dado stack. It perfromed great. I went with the 6” because I didnt want to run the risk of bogging down the saw with an 8”. I also have the Oshlun box joint 8” and the Bosch ran that just fine. I think as long as you dont take deep wide cuts you could get away with the 8”, but the 6” will pretty much do everything you need and its less expensive. When I got my new saw I bought an 8” Oshlun only because I couldnt use my 6”. I think they are great blades for the price, nice cut leaves very small bat ears. I read a comparison of the Frued, Oshlun and the Dewalt and they took a picture showing the bat ears left by all three, the oshlun was the smallest. Either size will work, mostly just preference as to how big a diameter you want.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1204 posts in 973 days


#6 posted 464 days ago

I have the 4100 with the Diablo 8” dado set. I’ve had no issues with the saw bogging down. I’m not cutting full-capacity dados in hard maple, but I’ve put it to good use. I had to notch out the bottom of a red oak newel post a few weeks back, taking out a section about 4” wide by 2” deep. I made a couple passes at it and had no problems.

The 4100 can handle the 8” no problem. Don’t force the wood through, and listen to the saw.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2709 posts in 1181 days


#7 posted 463 days ago

I also have the 4100 and use an 8” dado stack. Two, in fact.
I use a cmt set from the lowe’s clearance a while back, and this delta/dewalt set. IMHO, the oshlun is ok, but not for the price. The delta/dewalt is probably the best deal on a good dado set.

One more thing is to look at the chipper design; chippers with full bodies, even at 6”, don’t really give much of a weight savings on an 8” set that uses the cross plate style.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5371 posts in 1979 days


#8 posted 463 days ago

”I read a comparison of the Frued, Oshlun and the Dewalt and they took a picture showing the bat ears left by all three, the oshlun was the smallest.”

Here are a couple of pics of cuts by the Oshlun and the DW done on the same TS by “Lumberyard” over at Woodnet. In my experience, the DW leaves a cleaner cut than the lower priced Freud set. Based on Lumberyards comments and pics, it appears that it’s cleaner cutting and leaves smaller bat ears than the Oshlun too.

DW/Delta:

Oshlun:

crazybrit – If you decide to go with an 8”, I’d swing for the 7670 set. If not, the Oshlun 6” is fine.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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crazybrit

5 posts in 598 days


#9 posted 462 days ago

I ended up picking up the last Delta 35-7670 that Cripe had.

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1168 days


#10 posted 461 days ago

I have the 6” Oshlun set from amazon. I’ve only used it a few times so far, but it seems pretty nice and well made.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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cde

1 post in 48 days


#11 posted 48 days ago

I”m going to follow crazybrit a bit here. I just picked up a 4109, and am doing a fence project that needs a 7/8 wide by 1/2 inch deep dado cut in a 4×4 cedar post, a bunch of them. Since it is soft wood, can I go 1/2 inch deep on one pass, or do a couple of them. I Know I”ll have to de a couple of passes because of the max width being 3/4 on the bosch. So, What stack would be advisable? Thanx folks.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1204 posts in 973 days


#12 posted 48 days ago

I just built a replacement mailbox post and had to cut half laps in a pressure treated 4×4. I used a 3/8” wide dado and made multiple passes at full height, which was around 1 3/4”. No problems. You can go 1/2” in one pass, I’ve done that in harder woods than cedar. If I was doing a 7/8” wide dado, I’d set my stack at 1/2” so I could do it in 2 passes, with a little overlap.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

188 posts in 1548 days


#13 posted 47 days ago

Keep in mind, when using jigs, the dado will be raised as much as 3/4”. For this reason, using a six inch dado to cut box joint in 1” material just isn’t going to happen. Said another way, I have to pick up an 8” to keep my six inch wobble and stacker dados company.

View English's profile

English

153 posts in 81 days


#14 posted 47 days ago

I have the Saw Stop 1.75 contractor saw. It only has a brake assembly for a 8” dado set. I have had no problems with full 3/4” dadoes in Oak and Hickory.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

188 posts in 1548 days


#15 posted 33 days ago

Also keep in mind, though the eight inch could be used to take off more material, I and most others would seldom or never use it to that capacity. Rather, it is used to get past the jig, as I noted above.

One exception might be mortise and tenons. However, even an eight inch may not be enough to handle two inch wide and thicker stock. I end up making three passes with my stock ten inch blade, instead.

I have a three horse, but I’d still be inclined to take a couple passes, whether I was using a dado or a standard blade.

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