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Breadboard ends, few questions.

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Forum topic by lateralus819 posted 04-16-2013 10:04 PM 1175 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lateralus819

1399 posts in 547 days


04-16-2013 10:04 PM

Been reading a lot in prep for my table, I see people do BB ends different everytime. I see one long tenon, multip shorter ones. Which is better?

Would a drawbore dowel be necessary for pinning?

Also, how tight should the M/T be?

Finally, how much roughly should i account for movement on my mortise?

I’m using 1-7/8” thick sapele the table will be roughly 46” wide by 62” long.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin


13 replies so far

View Willeh's profile

Willeh

228 posts in 996 days


#1 posted 04-16-2013 10:59 PM

I did a trunk with bedboard ends about a year ago and ended up just doing biscuits.. has held together perfectly so far anyways…
Click for details

-- Will, Ontario Canada. "I can do fast, cheap and good, but you can only pick two... "

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

266 posts in 1270 days


#2 posted 04-16-2013 11:14 PM

I met Mario Rodriguez at an event where he was showing a blanket chest he had made. It had breadboard ends on its top and he pinned the tenons in oversized holes in the tenosn to allow the differential movement, but still kept the breadboard attached. Also, I think he only used glue in the middle of the breadboard to allow for movement along the rest of its length.

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View TarHeelz's profile

TarHeelz

3 posts in 738 days


#3 posted 04-16-2013 11:26 PM

This webpage goes through the method I followed for a dining room table. The page has been recommended a number of times. (I had to read it through carefully a few times to feel good about it.)

http://www.beautifulwood.net/html/breadboard_ends.html

If the design will allow it, there’s a lot to be said for cutting the ends a little wider than the table planks.

-- Tar Heelz, Durham, NC USA

View DMC1903's profile

DMC1903

186 posts in 984 days


#4 posted 04-16-2013 11:27 PM

I use Norm’s method for building Bread board ends, never had an issue wth them.
Here is a link to his video on creating them
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFCU7Buftac
Enjoy

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1399 posts in 547 days


#5 posted 04-17-2013 12:17 AM

I planned on making the BBs extend a tad passed, i think it will look good.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

235 posts in 1074 days


#6 posted 04-17-2013 12:22 AM

Expect change in width to be 3/10 inch for each 15% change in relative humidity and 1/4 inch change in length for a 46 inch wide by 62 inch long tabletop of sabele.

The breadboard end will decrease/increase 1/5 inch in length with a 15% change in RH.

Note the change in dimension isn’t immediate when the relative humidity chages. The above is after the RH has been changed long enough for the wood’s moisture content to stabilize at the new RH.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1168 posts in 1516 days


#7 posted 04-17-2013 12:47 AM

MNgary,

I think you’ve misinterpreted the wood movement factors. Most authorities say that longitudinal (length) movement is typically less than 0.1%...

The change in length of the breadboard is not the significant factor (nor is the change in length of the main panel.

The significant factor is the change in width (cross-grain) of the main panel. As it changes relative to the length of the breadboard ends the design must provide for movement. Typically the breadboards will be either pinned or glued in either the center (allowing for movement of both the front and back edge or on the front, allowing movement to the back.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

235 posts in 1074 days


#8 posted 04-17-2013 01:10 AM

My dimension changes may be wrong, HerbC. I didn’t have the change coefficient for sabele in my dBase so used the wood movement calculator on woodworkerssource.com

I agree the change in length seems high.

Edit: my error was I used radial result for length calculation – dumb mistake!

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1399 posts in 547 days


#9 posted 04-17-2013 01:31 AM

So leaving 1/8” gap on each end in the mortise should suffice?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

235 posts in 1074 days


#10 posted 04-17-2013 02:20 PM

If it were my project, I’d determine length of the breadboard and its mortise based upon moisture content of the wood at time of assembly (relative humidity wood is stabilized at). I.e., if the tabletop is stabilized at a very high level of humidity vs. quite low RH or somewhere in between.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View Willeh's profile

Willeh

228 posts in 996 days


#11 posted 04-18-2013 10:31 PM

TarHeelz, thanks for posting that link! That was a great article about how to do breadboards properly. I was looking at doing a harvest table this year and now i think i know how i will go about it!

-- Will, Ontario Canada. "I can do fast, cheap and good, but you can only pick two... "

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1399 posts in 547 days


#12 posted 04-24-2013 01:00 AM

One other thing i want to ask. The table with be roughly 48” long WITHOUT the breadboard ends, the stock i have for the Bread boards is 8/4 maple. 7” wide. Would that be too wide for a bread board? Or should i cut that in half?

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View mbs's profile

mbs

1439 posts in 1597 days


#13 posted 04-24-2013 03:55 AM

I would cut it in half to make it look more appropriate for a bread board end.

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

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