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What glue to use?

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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 468 days ago 629 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2938 posts in 887 days


468 days ago

I’ve been doing inlays in some of my work.
I have a hedge slab that has lots of cracks and fissures and I’d like to inlay them.
Charles Neil said to use white glue, but I’m having trouble understanding what white glue is.

If he or some of you other LJ’s that do inlays with this glue would chime in and let me know the brand and where to get it. I’d appreciate it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


16 replies so far

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2693 days


#1 posted 468 days ago

Elmers (called glue all) and Titebond both make white glue. I’m sure there are others.

The glue line is translucent. If mixed with sawdust, I find this blends better then yellow glue. Has a fast tact time and clamping time.

see

http://www.titebond.com/product.aspx?id=c944de78-f0a8-4180-b75e-026994aba708

and

http://www.amazon.com/Elmers-Multipurpose-White-Glue-E372/dp/B00004YTP3

-- Nicky

View designeratheart's profile

designeratheart

8 posts in 468 days


#2 posted 468 days ago

I have never heard of mixing saw dust with the glue. Do you think this would work for picture frame corners to reduce dry time? Or do you think I am better off with just glue and waiting it out?

I am new to making picture frames (like I haven’t started yet) and want to have as much information about what I am getting into as I can.

Thanks.
Sandi

-- Smile! It makes the day so much better!

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Nicky

636 posts in 2693 days


#3 posted 468 days ago

Mixing saw dust with glue is a good alternative as a filler, one that would match the color of the wood. I like white glue for this because it blends better then using yellow glue. This works really well in fixing miters.

I should have said faster time then yellow, although I never used a stop watch. All glues need time to cure for full strength. A miter joint is a stressed joint in terms of glue up, and its end-grain. I leave these clamped overnight before I perform any other operations. An unstressed joint, like an inlay, usually long grain to long grain, I’ll start working in an hour.

When you start, try experimenting to develop your method. I’m not necessarily telling you the best way, just my way.

-- Nicky

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designeratheart

8 posts in 468 days


#4 posted 468 days ago

Thank you so very much Nicky. Your way is at least something that has been used and works! Once I get started, I am sure I will do my fair share of experimenting (my husband say that is a bad habit of mine). Your input is a great start to my new found hobby.

Thanks again.
Sandi

-- Smile! It makes the day so much better!

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1123 posts in 1364 days


#5 posted 468 days ago

Sandi:

When joining miters for picture frames, it’s best to use a miter clamp, specifically made to join the joints in a picture frame. The clamp is specifically made to clamp picture frames together – NOT those cheeeeeep aluminum thingees you find at ACE, HD, Lowe’s, etc. The real clamps are cast iron. They can be found at Highlandhardware, Rockler, Woodcraft, Woodworkers Supply, Amazon, or others who deal in picture framing supplies. They normally cost around $60-$70, and is worth all the pain an effort.

From an ex professional picture framer.

-- BELT SANDER: Used for making rectangular gouges in wood.

View reesbee's profile

reesbee

6 posts in 468 days


#6 posted 468 days ago

Sandi, you might find a local framer who will join your mitred wood for you—if you are just doing a couple of frames it would be the cheapest option.

You’d still have plenty of work to put into it with the finishing work!

-- "Trifles make perfection, and perfection is no trifle." ~ Michelangelo

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3348 posts in 2561 days


#7 posted 468 days ago

Most glues used in WWing today are PVA (poly vinyl acetate). White, yellow, tan, are pretty much the same except for applications. Unless you wanna get pretty exotic with moisture resistance, “grab” time, etc., the basic white and yellow glues will give ya pretty much all ya need.
Some folks have favs based on their experiences, but I tend to use the Titebond or Gorilla PVAs (not urethane unless I’m gonna glue a rock to a piece of wood).
Yellow, white, tan, blah, blah, blah. Whatever works for your specific needs.
Google PVA wood glues. Study the application need that you have.
Kinda like Ford or Chevy in my mind.
These are only my thoughts. Others may/will differ.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7253 posts in 2249 days


#8 posted 468 days ago

White glue is the old standby like Elmer’s (which is good
glue, except when spoiled, like all glues). It tends to
have longer open time than yellow glue so a lot of
furnituremakers prefer it (like me) because it allows
more time to work in complex assemblies.

I use Titebond 2 Extend now, which is white, but the
color of the glue these days does not indicate what sort
of properties it has. I use the Titebond because it
works with my thermal press. Otherwise I’d probably
use Elmer’s for interior work and indoor furniture.

I usually buy glue by the gallon so my brand preference
for Elmer’s has to do with its reasonable price and
broad availability. The Titebond stuff I like I have to
drive to a specialty store or mail order and pay shipping.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View designeratheart's profile

designeratheart

8 posts in 468 days


#9 posted 468 days ago

Wow! I am shocked at how many responses I’m getting!

AND VERY GRATEFUL!

I am so glad I found this site. I won’t go to far off course with so many helpful people!!

-- Smile! It makes the day so much better!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2178 days


#10 posted 468 days ago

Russ White glue dry’s clear that’s why Charles suggest it.
Sandi
Glue with saw dust is an old trick to fill cracks but not necessarily a good fix in my opinion. This is certainly not the way to start a glue up on miters,by mixing glue and saw dust. When gluing end grain (like miters) rub some glue in the end grain let it set a couple minutes then add some more glue and clamp. Here’s a few ways to clamp miters,

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/45150

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/45152

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3785 posts in 981 days


#11 posted 468 days ago

PVA glue and sawdust has never worked well for me because the glue shrinks and the sawdust won’t absorb finish so it sticks out like a sore thumb. I’ve had good luck with CA glue and sawdust. CA dries clear and sawdust looks fine under a finish. I’ve tried sawdust and epoxy but it looks muddy.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7253 posts in 2249 days


#12 posted 468 days ago

I don’t use PVA mixed with sawdust in fine work. In paint
grade work I guess it’s an okay, if unpleasantly sticky,
alternative to off-the-shelf fillers like Durham’s water
putty.

If you want a filler for nice work, you can stir aniline
dye powder or leather dyes into 2 part epoxy and it works
okay and has a fine texture.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2938 posts in 887 days


#13 posted 468 days ago

Jim, is he talking just plain old Elmers or something special?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2178 days


#14 posted 468 days ago

I’m sure it’s just good old Elmers Russ, Charles will always answer your questions if you just shoot him an e-mail or Pm .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13307 posts in 939 days


#15 posted 468 days ago

Russ, 1+ on what Jim said. Charles is one of the nicest people you will meet and a finishing expert. Shoot him an email. He will answer.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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