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Burr Oak??

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Forum topic by restowood posted 2103 days ago 875 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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restowood

22 posts in 2298 days


2103 days ago

My wife’s uncle has offered me access to his woodpile. Her family lives on alot of acreage and every few years they go through and mill out a bunch of logs. 4 years ago he milled a bunch of Burr Oak and Walnut. All of this wood is 1 3/4” thick 12’ long and varying widths. I am getting ready to do a basic mission style dining table and I am wondering what the Burr Oak will look like finished and the challenges in working with Burr Oak. I am planning on using both species for some contrast. It has been sitting in a barn stickered for 4 years. I am not familiar with the milling process enough to know if this wood is ready to work with or not. Any info is greatly appreciated. Thanks

-- "Nature provides us with the most beautiful things in this world"


10 replies so far

View trifern's profile

trifern

8132 posts in 2350 days


#1 posted 2103 days ago

Burr oak is in the white oak family and is a high quality wood for furniture. I have always heard wood needs to dry 1 year per inch, so it should be fine. You may want to take a moisture reading to be certain.

-- My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one.

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sharad

1063 posts in 2388 days


#2 posted 2103 days ago

Hope for the best results after you gather all information from experienced buddies.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

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restowood

22 posts in 2298 days


#3 posted 2102 days ago

Can I expect the same look as standard white oak when I quarter saw this wood. Thanks

-- "Nature provides us with the most beautiful things in this world"

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trifern

8132 posts in 2350 days


#4 posted 2101 days ago

I would expect similar results.

-- My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one.

View Joey's profile

Joey

275 posts in 2398 days


#5 posted 2101 days ago

if it’s already milled to thickness, you’ll may have difficulty getting quatersawn pieces. you usually pick how the wood is saw, either plain, rift, or quater, when the initial milling is done. you’ll have to go through the lumber and find the quatersawn pieces. but you should get the same rays and flecks that white oak has.

-- Joey, Magee, Ms http://woodnwaresms.com

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restowood

22 posts in 2298 days


#6 posted 2101 days ago

thanks for the info. I don’t know if there is plain, rift, or quartered. I will find out when I get there. I am hoping to get as much character as possible.

-- "Nature provides us with the most beautiful things in this world"

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restowood

22 posts in 2298 days


#7 posted 2100 days ago

I have everythign drawn up and want to confirm my thinking on the table top. I am wanting to us 6- 6 1/2×1 1/2×64 pieces to make the top. I am thinking I want to groove both sides of the planks and then use a walnut spline (tongue) in between the oak. This would show the walnut splines on the ends as rectangles. Do you guys think that gluing it up with the tongues will be sturdy enough? will the differences of movement between the oak and walnut give me seasonal gapping? I’m open too suggestions. Any advice is knowledge. Thanks

-- "Nature provides us with the most beautiful things in this world"

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Les Hastings

1274 posts in 2356 days


#8 posted 2096 days ago

I really don’t think you will have much problem with movement between the two. The walnut will be so small that it shoudn’t really matter. I would use epoxy for the glue up though. And having a full lenth spline will do nothing but make stronger. If your worried about making the walnut splines full lenth then you could just mortise the walnut in the ends about an inch or so. But again I don’t really see this as being a problem, but others might.

-- Les, Wichita, Ks. (I'd rather be covered in saw dust!)

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restowood

22 posts in 2298 days


#9 posted 2095 days ago

Les, Thanks for the input. I have never used epoxy in a wood application before. Is there anything I should look out for on it. I looked in Woodworkers supply and the epoxy adhesives seem fairly self explanatory.

-- "Nature provides us with the most beautiful things in this world"

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Les Hastings

1274 posts in 2356 days


#10 posted 2094 days ago

I use west systems epoxy all the time,it works well for just about anything. You can get it at the sailboat place in Andover, just east of there on the north side of the highway. Get the 206 hardener, it has a longer open time.

-- Les, Wichita, Ks. (I'd rather be covered in saw dust!)

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