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Forum topic by BuckeyeNate posted 04-14-2013 08:06 AM 1208 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


04-14-2013 08:06 AM

Hello all,

I picked up this jet jointer off of CL this week

I just got around to cleaning and set up. The bed tops had some surface rust on them, but a little wet sanding with WD-40 ive arrived at this:

Im sure ill hit it again, but for an inital clean up, i think it looks good.

Now the issue…

i took a square and noticed that the fence wasnt 90 to the beds…no big deal. However, while i was sorting out the 90 degree stop, i noticed something odd. When the fence is locked in place, the distance from the fence to the edge of the beds werent the same. In other words, the fence is 90 degrees to the bed, but crooked.

on the infeed table to bed’s edge:

on the outfeed table to bed’s edge:

I am not really sure whats causing this, but i did notice the fence carriage didnt line up to the bottom casting perfectly

And the beds werent perfectly lined up either

Will this even matter? I mean, i would like them to be in line if possible, but if it wont effect the performance, i may just deal with it. I know there is a key the keeps the fence inline while sliding the fence in and out, could that be bad? Im at a loss, ive never seen this on a jointer before…anyone know how to get the fence coplanar?


15 replies so far

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1014 posts in 1389 days


#1 posted 04-14-2013 10:34 AM

I have that jointer. Can’t get to it right now, but I’ll look at it later and get back if I have any ideas. FWIW, I have had very good luck with that machine, bought it new about ten years ago.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#2 posted 04-14-2013 02:23 PM

You’re right, in use, that wouldnt be an issue.

But something is awry. I have a PM and those pix look like a clone. The cast piece on top rides on what we might call a cast shelf that attaches to the back side of the machine. I think that attachment is what you need to look at.

You’d loosen the locking device and remove it and that whole thing—top casting and the fence—should lift off.

I trust that some answers will reveal themselves at that point.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View habib's profile

habib

4 posts in 1388 days


#3 posted 04-14-2013 02:33 PM

I’m looking at a similiar jointer this week so will be following this. Thanks for asking the question.

View BuckeyeNate's profile

BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


#4 posted 04-14-2013 03:26 PM

Thanks all, i may wait a day or two for a few more responses before I tear into it. Maybe someone has had this exact issue, if not…ill document whats up.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1014 posts in 1389 days


#5 posted 04-14-2013 03:32 PM

Ok, got a chance to look at mine (which is a 6 inch jointer, looks like yours is 8?).
At first I thought your beds not lining up with each other was the problem, but my infeed bed is narrower than my outfeed table, so that isn’t it. I’m thinking Lee is right. See photo of mine below. The “cast shelf” is square to the infeed bed, and the cast piece that rides on that (and holds the fence) is also square to the shelf and the infeed bed. It looks like your misalignment is between the shelf and the piece that rides on it. Like Lee said that whole thing lifts off. Let us know what you find in there! Also, it looks like you could adjust the attachment of the fence to the cast slider by means of the threaded attachment points, one of which is highlighted in my photo by the red spring clamp (sadly, the limit of my “tech savvy”). I’m not sure how much +/- you could get out of those studs, but if all else fails it might be an option. They have locknuts on them, which should help. Worst case scenario, like you said, it doesn’t really matter except for losing a bit of width/capacity, but it aint right. Hope that helps.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View JM3's profile

JM3

9 posts in 1333 days


#6 posted 04-14-2013 05:19 PM

my two cents…..The infeed table is offset for two reasons..First…The cast iron table/extension that the fences rides on is attached to the out feed table and the offset/clearance you see is clearance for the infeed table to be raised/lowered/adjusted. second, the differance in width of the tables from the fence to the closest edge(where the operater stands) is for the jointers ability to cut rabbits. Check that the blades are installed even with the closet edge to where the operater would stand. this makes the rabitt able to pass the outfeed table (thats why some blades are angled on the ends). then move the fence to the edge of the blade at the rear….. This should give a 6inch table width on the outfeed and about 6 3/4 in on the infeed. also check to make surethe long key is in place on the cast fence platform….some people take that off to skew the fence to help reduce tearout (creates a shearing cut, but lessens the width of cut).

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BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


#7 posted 04-14-2013 07:01 PM

So i went to check out the shelve and mine was off quite a bit:

I didnt feel like adding all these up, but as you can see….there was quite a gap:

I took a look at the fence locating key, everything appears to be ok, i took the entire fence off and when i put it back it appeared to be the same.

I ended up loosening the two bolts that attached the shelve to the jointer “body” and fine tuned it a bit. I ended up cutting the gap above to about half of whats shown.

Is this how everyone’s jointer like this and i just never noticed? The point is to square a face or two on a board, so if the fence is out of whack a bit, i dont think its the end of the world as long as its close to 90 degrees as possible to the beds.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#8 posted 04-14-2013 07:30 PM

Having identified the problem, we can go a little further.

First of all, no mfr would want the fence to be that much out of line when the tool sat on a showroom floor.

I think we all agree that a “little out” is no big deal. So the question is why.

My theory is that the parts of the shelf that mate to the body of the tool were never machined correctly. Maybe never machined! So, Dr. Nate, would you be willing to operate a little more and see what those mating surfaces look like?

Just curious….

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#9 posted 04-14-2013 08:56 PM

That locating key looks twisted—is that an optical delusion?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1014 posts in 1389 days


#10 posted 04-14-2013 09:51 PM

JM3 is right. I never measured my bed widths. Just went measured them. The beds are different widths, for the reasons he states, and therefore give different measurements from the fence. I’ve never cut a rabbet using my jointer, always used the router table or TS. I always knew it was capable, but never much considered it after that.

Buckeye, how much do the measurements differ from each end of ONE bed (infeed or outfeed), and over what distance? That would give a better indication of how much skew present.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View BuckeyeNate's profile

BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


#11 posted 04-15-2013 02:32 AM

Picklehead: I took a pic where i measured from:

From the right most part of the infeed i get about 6 1/2 and 5 7/8” on the outfeed as left most as possible, the fence is only 29”!!! Man the most i look into this the worse off it gets….

Also, weird thing…I measured with my calipers the two bolts you pointed to with the spring clamp and they both were with in a few thou. I think one was .669 (infeed) and .659 (outfeed). Would a difference in 10 thou affect the angle of the fence that drasticly? So thinking about this logically, the bolt that was “shorter” would be pushing the table out…which does support my situation….hmmm….

Lee,

The locating key is a little twisted, but the picture makes it look worse than it truly is. Tomorrow after work, i will tear into the fence shelve and mating surface. I’ll take some pictures to get everyone’s input…..stay tuned.

View BuckeyeNate's profile

BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


#12 posted 04-15-2013 02:36 AM

One more food for thought…pickle…look at the picture you took showing the square and spring clamp.

Notice there is a shelve or ledge you’re resting the square on?

Now look at my second jointer picture…i think the dude who assembled this thing may have put the beds on backwards?

Thanks all…

View JM3's profile

JM3

9 posts in 1333 days


#13 posted 04-15-2013 04:52 AM

The tables can not be put on backwards…..You have the bed extension for the guard and rabitt ledge on the infeed. I belive the early model Jet jointers had short bed lengths and short fence lenghts.

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Picklehead

1014 posts in 1389 days


#14 posted 04-15-2013 10:45 AM

Buckeye, there’s not a ledge there, it’s a photographical optical delusion. About your second set of measurements, I was asking about measurements from the fence on ONE bed, so you could remove the different bed widths from the equation. Probably the outfeed bed would be better because the fence runs longer over that bed.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

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BuckeyeNate

9 posts in 1476 days


#15 posted 04-16-2013 11:56 PM

Picklehead, i remeasured less than a 1/16” difference over a 15” span on the outfeed. I call that good for what i need to do.

Thank everyone for their input, im putting this one to bed!....now lets make some sawdust.

-Nate

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