LumberJocks

How do i magnetize a 3' piece of 2" Angle Iron ????

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by C_PLUS_Woodworker posted 04-12-2013 06:25 PM 1681 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


04-12-2013 06:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Ok you mechanical engineers out there.

I have a new 3’ piece of 2” Angle Iron (1/8” thick……..no rust) that I want to magnetize and then place it in the upright side of a window in my shop. I will wrap it around the corner and will hopefully will end up with two long sides that are magnetized.

I want to hang:

Tape measures

Those little magnetized bowls for screws, etc that I get from Harbor Freight…......... (Obviously I know they will stick)

Marking Knife

Cheapo Combo-square (I keep my 2 good ones boxed and in a drawer)

Little stuff like that that I want handy…......a place for everything and everything in its place kind of thing

Here is what I found when surfing: (and it ain’t working).......... so I really did try to learn something before I bothered you guys.

A permanent magnet can be made by stroking a magnetic substance with either the N or the S pole of a magnet. Stroking lines up the domains in the material.

A piece of iron can be magnetized by holding it parallel to a compass needle (along the lines of force in the earth’s field) and hitting the piece of iron with a hammer. The blow will overcome the resistance of the domains to movement, and they will line up parallel to the earth’s field.

Can this even be done by a dummy?

Thanks………..Bruce

-- We must all walk our own green mile


32 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

5939 posts in 2152 days


#1 posted 04-12-2013 06:33 PM

Another dummy, here. Great idea. I’ll be watching to see if it can be done.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 613 days


#2 posted 04-12-2013 06:48 PM

LOL, the hammer strike method does work, albeit you are left with a relatively weak magnet. However, if you do the hammer strike method and then introduce your metal into a electromagnetic field(VDC), you will get a powerful magnet since you have already begun to align the domains.

There is so much info on magnets and magnetization online, you could be an expert in a week.

If you do try the hammer strike, don’t forget to orient the north side of your metal slightly downward once aligned with the poles.

Good Luck

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1772 days


#3 posted 04-12-2013 06:58 PM

Not all steel can be magnetize or at least some steel take magnetization better than other.

I would try to make a coil of wire around and then to run a current through the coil.

You can buy already made magnets at Harbor Freight for next to nothing, why bother?

-- Bert

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1857 posts in 2285 days


#4 posted 04-12-2013 07:00 PM

Either of those methods will magnetize the bar, but it will be so weak that nothing (other than another magnet) will stick to it with any force.

Another method that theoretically would result in a stronger magnet would be to wrap it (from one end to the other) with pretty heavy copper wire and apply 12 volts to it from a car battery. Somebody else can figure out the details of how many turns, how long, etc. etc.

-- Joe

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2933 posts in 1967 days


#5 posted 04-12-2013 07:02 PM

An ordinary steel angle may be magnetized, but I’m not sure how strong a magnetic field you would get. I think it depends on the composition of the steel. A steel with a high Silicon content would make a good magnet.

View AUBrian's profile

AUBrian

85 posts in 1395 days


#6 posted 04-12-2013 07:03 PM

Both of the methods you suggested would probably end up with pretty weak magnets, quite possibly not able to hold the things you want to. Bert’s got a better idea, but the best is to attach some neodynium magnets to the angle iron and let those hold the tools. Or better yet, build yourself a nice looking wood shelf with the magnets embedded, like some of the knife strips out there.

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 613 days


#7 posted 04-12-2013 07:05 PM

This might help.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


#8 posted 04-12-2013 07:13 PM

OK, several questions in response to your (I appreciate them) posts

Bert…...... are you thinking just add a couple of (???) brick sized magnets and that will do the entire thing? I was kinda hoping just sticking my magnetic HF screw bowls (3 small, I double) would “spread” the magnetism….......(I am really dumb about this stuff….......

Scotsman…......what is VDC?

Joe…...... I will do a little more on-line reading….........

Lastly, ......... Ribs and Chicken and a full cooler are on me…..........when are you guys coming over?

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


#9 posted 04-12-2013 07:17 PM

Duplicate post

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 613 days


#10 posted 04-12-2013 07:20 PM

It just means you have to magnetize something with VDC or Direct Current. VAC is what comes out of our outlets, DC is like your car battery.

Not trying to stifle your enthusiasm at all, but basic electrical knowledge would be best if you plan on introducing electrical fields to metal.

Be careful.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1144 days


#11 posted 04-12-2013 07:21 PM

VDC = Voltage of Direct Current.
(Like that from a battery, though, judging from the setup, it’s likely just rectified AC current.)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


#12 posted 04-12-2013 07:21 PM

Scotsman…......as was suggested above,.................... any idea from anyone as to how much wrapped wire, wire gauge….................. and is my truck battery the way to go…...????

(Or should I run a magnet over my Pacemaker-Defibrillator and see if that works…...... probably be the last thing I EVER did) LOL

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


#13 posted 04-12-2013 07:23 PM

One more thought…........... are their places that could do this for me ?

-- We must all walk our own green mile

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 613 days


#14 posted 04-12-2013 07:30 PM

There is a safer alternative using the touch method or double touch method. Look them up online, but this is an awful lot of effort, I do not suggest using a truck battery. Your winding would be cost prohibitive in copper to generate enough field.

If you want to go that route, borrow or buy a DC power supply and build yourself a winding tunnel.

The equipment alone to build a proper magnet (one that does not revert back to its original state) will cost a lot more than just buying a magnet.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View C_PLUS_Woodworker's profile

C_PLUS_Woodworker

499 posts in 1631 days


#15 posted 04-12-2013 07:37 PM

Just found this….....(sure do appreciate the posts)

Magnetize Steel Using a Steel Bar and a Battery
1. Obtain a steel bar from a hobby or home repair store
2. Strip an inch (2.5cm) or so of insulation from each end of an insulated wire.
3. Arrange the insulated wire in an undulating pattern on top of the steel bar. The wire should go from one side of the bar to the other several times in a wavy pattern.
4. Place something heavy—like books, a board, or bricks—on top of the bar and wire so that the wire makes good contact with the steel bar.
5. Attach one end of the wire to the negative terminal of a 12-volt battery.
6. Grab the insulated part of the other end of the wire with insulated pliers and tap on the positive end of the terminal several times. Since you’re completing the circuit, there will be sparks.

-- We must all walk our own green mile

showing 1 through 15 of 32 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase