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Makita 2030N restore

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Forum topic by mantwi posted 372 days ago 1596 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


372 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: makita combination planer jointer refurb

A few months back I picked up a Makita 2030N combination planer/jointer and I’m finally getting around to refurbishing it. The machine is in good condition overall but being 30 plus years old has some issues that I need to correct. The first thing I found was that the knives were as dull as marbles and the previous owner had them set way too low. After removing, cleaning and sharpening the knives I re-installed them at the proper height. There is a thin hold down that has two springs that keep the knives snug enough to set them without tightening the gibs too much, very helpful device. I also like the way the knives are made with a mild steel back and the tool steel cutting edge inset to it. The soft back makes honing easier.
The second issue is not so easily resolved. The urethane feed rollers are glazed and as head as plastic, no grip whatsoever. To compound the problem they are also so worn that by the time you get them to make good contact with the workpiece the chipbreaker is pinning it to the bed like Hulk Hogan. As you can imagine it will not feed more than a few inches before the board stops. Now I must say if I push the board through the sharpened knives this planer produces the finest surface I have seen straight from the knives of any planer. Very Nice. I’m really needing to get those feed rollers recovered and that’s where the problem comes in. I can’t figure out how to remove the drive sprocket from the feed roller assembly. It has a retaining ring, I took that off but the sprocket will not budge. Having learned the foolishness of getting all gorilla with things I don’t really understand and trashing them in the process I am turning you my fellow Lumberjocks. Any information on this procedure (which Makita left completely out of the manual) would be greatly appreciated.
As time goes on I will post links where you can view the progress just don’t look for pretty. I don’t want it to look like new, I want it to work like new. After all the work it produces is the real measure of a machines worth and being a little long in tooth myself I kinda like ‘em looking broke in. Look forward to hearing from you all and thanks in advance. Tony Wilson


10 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

387 posts in 698 days


#1 posted 372 days ago

Based on the parts diagram, it looks basically the same as my 2030.. After you take off the retaining clip, the gear should pull straight off along with the woodruff key. If it won’t come off with a gentle pry from behind with a large flat blade screwdriver, you might need to get a puller.

As for recovering the rollers.. I highly recommend Western Roller.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

453 posts in 1638 days


#2 posted 371 days ago

I have a 2040 that I disassembled a while back.
From what I remember once you remove the e-clip you should be able to pull the sprocket off. Is it a keyed shaft? If it is, it should pull straight off. You may need to use a gear puller.

This is the only pic I have of the roller & sprocket

http://lumberjocks.com/Sarit/blog/22275

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


#3 posted 371 days ago

Brad: That’s what I thought but I wanted to make sure before i start prying on this thing. I stopped at a local pawn shop and picked up a nice pair of gear pullers (large and a small) for next to nothing and will get after it tomorrow. Thanks for the reply.

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mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


#4 posted 371 days ago

Sarit: It does have a small key and as you and Brad recommended I have picked up a gear puller for the job.
Your rollers make mine look like new. Actually they may be, whereas all the pictures I’ve seen show yellow rollers and they are described as soft mine are white and slick and hard, really hard like UHMW plastic. I’m beginning to think the previous owner had them recovered by someone who wasn’t familiar with planer rollers. Appreciate the input. I’ll get some pics up soon as I figure out how this crazy thing works. (computer that is)

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

387 posts in 698 days


#5 posted 371 days ago

The rollers on these machines are the only negative I’ve been able to determine, with pretty much everyone needing to get them recovered at one point or another. On the first 2030 I purchased, the rubber had completely disintegrated and all that was left was the steel shafts:

A second 2030 I obtained had what I believe are the original rollers, and they were in surprisingly outstanding shape. Here is a picture of the original (black rubber) rollers, along side the pair of rollers that I had recovered (yellow):

I have the recovered ones in my working machine currently, and they have performed flawlessly so far.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1028 posts in 447 days


#6 posted 371 days ago

if you are still fighting it you may need a little heat. I mean a little, like a heat gun or halogen light. It will let the plastic expand enough it will slid right off. When I am putting on snug bearings I freeze the shaft (over night)and gently warm up the race of the bearing. Usually with a light. when every thing is ready they just slide right in.

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


#7 posted 371 days ago

Brad. I’m assuming the yellow ones are urethane rubber and are soft. Like I said the white ones on my feed rollers are hard and slick. I’ll look for a local outfit that knows the proper diameter and if I can’t find one Western Rollers here I came. Thanks again.

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


#8 posted 371 days ago

Shawn Masterson. I was wondering if freezing would be beneficial. Looks like it will. I’ll try your trick on the arbor bearings for an ancient Grizzly G1023 I’m also restoring as well as the feed roller sprockets on the planer. Now if I can just find the right start capacitor for the 3 HP motor on that table saw I’ll be on my way. I can’t thank you all enough for the input, I love working on old cast iron but researching it can be difficult. Fortunately what the manufacturers neglect to tell the experience of others can supply. Thanks and God bless.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1028 posts in 447 days


#9 posted 370 days ago

just go to eBay for the capacitor. those are universal just match the MF rating and the shape. I would make sure it is ok to freeze the new roller material.

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

262 posts in 395 days


#10 posted 271 days ago

I just got the feed rollers back from Western Roller and installed them, they work great. The people at Western Roller are very helpful, it did take almost a month to get them back but it was well worth the wait. This old Makita
2030N is an awesome little machine. I”ll post some photos of it when my son shows me how.
To Shawn Masterson, I bought a couple of bearing pullers at a pawn shop and it was a breeze to replace the bearings and the capacitor wasn’t the problem. Upon closer examination I saw that the previous owner of the G1023 had used 14/2 cord for an extension, 50’ of it!! No wonder the saw wouldn’t run. I replaced it with 8’ of 10/3.

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