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Forum topic by geagleiam posted 04-10-2013 06:09 AM 963 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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geagleiam

1 post in 1340 days


04-10-2013 06:09 AM

My hobby is drawing and because I like carving too and want to make the ornaments on the frames to be in harmony with the paintings I want to make the frames by myself, but as a beginner I can not see the difference between lathe tools and carving tools and would like to ask you if the following tools are appropriate:

1. Number 3 from http://www.dleta.net/catalogue_bg.htm
2. Number 1 from http://www.dleta.net/catalogue_bg.htm
3. Number 41 from http://www.dleta.net/catalogue5_bg.htm

You can have a look at them here too:

http://www.dleta.net/catalogue_ready.htm

I will be very grateful, if someone help me with advice.


5 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22040 posts in 1804 days


#1 posted 04-10-2013 07:56 AM

I want to welcome you to LumberJocks. I don’t know squat about carving tools, but you’ll find plenty here that do.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1204 posts in 2356 days


#2 posted 04-10-2013 09:13 AM

Welcome!
Google Chris Pye, Chris is an accomplished British carver.
Chris occasionally posts instructive videos.
One of his books is all about tool selection.
The Fine Woodworking store handles Chris’ books and videos.

And yes some of the sites you posted have the right types of tools.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2591 days


#3 posted 04-10-2013 09:39 PM

The biggest difference between Turning Tools and Carving tool are the thickness and heaviness of the tool. Lathe tools are bulky to stand up against the constant turning and working pressure.. they have longer handles for better control. Basically turning tools are carving tools of a sort…. but are too unwieldy to carve with…. the material moves more than the worker.

You can carve with most any kind of tool as long as it is sharp. I do small intricate work, so my carving tools are easy to adjust and re-sharpen for each task I need to finish. There are carving tools which are bulky as well, but for use with a mallet. The shape, cutting angle, and metal hardness are all factors for each type of carving. The worker moves more than the material. I would say the tools you are looking at are great!

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2416 posts in 2388 days


#4 posted 04-10-2013 11:17 PM

I agree with EPJartisan that the ones you are looking at are fine. I find in my carving that the most used gouges are #2 a skew and a firmer.(straight tool). I also find a “V” tool useful. I have a “mastercarver ” power carver now and I like it for small detail work.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2526 posts in 1743 days


#5 posted 04-10-2013 11:36 PM

Here’s a little info that may help…Carving gouges not only come in different widths and but also numbered according to the sweep. A lower sweep number indicates a flatter curve. The higher the number the deeper the curve

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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